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PSD Green Slide FPR May 21, 2007

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Title: PSD Green Slide FPR May 21, 2007


1
NASA Heliophysics DivisionsStatus Overview
for ILWS WG
Madhulika Guhathakurta ILWS, Chair, LWS Program
Scientist June 11-12, 2008
2
Overarching Principles
At the center of the solar system there is a
magnetic variable star, the Sun, that drives the
Earth and other Planets, and structures in
interplanetary Space. All of NASAs activities,
all human endeavor, are subjected to forces in
this neighborhood.
3
Heliophysics (aka Science of Space
Weather) Understanding the Sun and its effects
on the Earth and the solar system. 1. This is a
complex system with many different temporal and
spatial scales 2. The study of heliophysics
involves three forces, and their interactions
pressure, gravity, and magnetic fields. 3. The
Sun is coupled to the planetary system and space
by radiation, charged particles, and magnetic
fields.
4
Major Activities Cutting edge scientific
research investigations in heliophysics with the
formulation, implementation and operation of
space flight missions. Operation of Directorate
level programs including the Explorer and
Sounding Rocket Programs. Establishment and
operation of space flight data bases and national
infrastructure and archives. Verification and
validation of system level predictive models of
physical systems. Operation of national-class
research and technology programs in the areas of
spaceflight and space instrumentation for
heliophysics investigations. Management and
operation of extended flight missions for the
discovery and communication of new scientific
knowledge. Education and Public Outreach
5
The Strategic Triad of Heliophysics
6
Heliospheric Division Flight Missions
7
Flight Mission Development
8
HP SR 2008 12 Projects under Review
Note 1 the THEMIS proposal bifurcates the
project into 3-ball THEMIS -LOW to continue
observing sub-storms in the inner magnetosphere
and the ARTEMIS-phase which carries 2 spacecraft
into Lunar orbit to study large-scale structures
in the solar wind and magnetotail. Note 2 the
Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program was
evaluated as the 13th project in the review.
9
HP SR 2008 The Grades
lt Overall scientific merit on a per dollar basis
Contribution to HP goals as outlined in the HP
2006 Roadmap gt
Shown are the average scores of 11 panelists.
Average of the standard deviations 1.5
10
HP SR 2008 Programmatic Actions
11
Heliophysics Division Achievements I Flight
Missions
  • ST-5 (Technology)
  • Hinode (International Collaboration - JAXA
    Mission)
  • STEREO
  • THEMIS
  • AIM
  • C/NOFS - CINDI (USAF Mission)
  • TWINS - MoO (US Govt. Missions)
  • Sounding Rocket Program/ LCAS (6 Decadal Survey
    2003) Reinvigorated
  • IBEX
  • SDO 3 Astrophysics Decadal Survey
  • RBSP 2 Decadal Survey (2003)
  • MMS 1 Decadal Survey (2003)
  • SO 4 (Small mission) (2015) International
    Collaboration- ESSA Mission)
  • SP 1 (Large mission) (2015)

12
Heliophysics Division Achievements II
  • Explorer Program Reorganized, SMEX Selection
    In Progress.
  • SRT program augmented 10 in FY09
  • NASA participating member of the CSW -
    SWEF/SWW/AMS
  • LWS Targeted Research and Technology Supports
    Modeling of Coupled Systems
  • Heliophysics Data Policy developed and ROSES
    used to develop the VxO systems
  • GI program increased in FY09 by 50
  • LWS/SRT/and Heliophysics Division Supports
    Theory Development
  • NASA establishes VxO internet access to data
    sets taken in Space - Virtual Sun
  • International Living with a Star program
    organized and established 2004
  • IHY concluding this year (2007-2008)
  • LWS Heliophysics Summer School (2007-2009)
    NASA-NCAR
  • LWS Workshops - Climate, Radiation
  • Planetarium show The Stars with NY Hayden
    Smithsonian (Spring, 2009)
  • Beacon mode transition from ACE to other assets
    (STEREO)

13
Heliophysics Mission Events
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
CY
Mission Launches etc.
Early 2010 ST7 Lisa Pathfinder
Oct 09 SET
Dec 08 SDO
Apr 07 AIM
Sep 08 IBEX
1st Quarter TWINS-B
Feb 07 THEMIS
Apr 16 CINDI
Suborbital
June Celestial ACS
Oct/Nov STORMS EUNIS
April TIMED U/F
(Hassler Korendyke, Harris) MOSES-2 EUV OFS
Jun FORTIS
Rocket/ Research Range Program
Jun, Aug (Davis, HERSCHEL)
Nov VERIS
Poker
Poker
Norway
Helio Missions
JOULE-2 (4) HEX-2 (4) ROPA CHARM
ACES (4) Turbopause (4) (Lynch)
TRICE (2) SCIFER-2
MASS (2)
Other missions
Jan LIDOS2
Jun-Jul CIBER1 ATK/HYBOLT
Aug LIDOS 1
Nov FUSP 1
Oct FUSP 2
Nov HRF 1
May CIBER 2
TBD HRF 2
Apr XQC3
Jul Student Scramjet
STS-122, 123
IRVE
STS-120
UAV Flight Tests
UAV Flight Tests
Opportunities
Sep 7
Oct 22 FOSO SMEX AO Amendmt
Fall 2008 SP
SMEX AO
Status as of 5/19/08
14
NASA SELECTS SMALL EXPLORER INVESTIGATIONS FOR
CONCEPT STUDIES
  • -- Coronal Physics Explorer (CPEX), Principal
    Investigator Dennis G. Socker, Naval Research
    Laboratory, Washington, D.C. CPEX will use a
    solar coronograph to study the processes
    responsible for accelerating the solar wind and
    generating the coronal mass ejections that can
    impact the Earth.
  • -- Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS),
    Principal Investigator Jean H. Swank, Goddard
    Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. GEMS will
    use an X-ray telescope to track the flow of
    highly magnetized matter into supermassive black
    holes.
  • -- Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS),
    Principal Investigator Alan M. Title, Lockheed
    Martin Space Systems Co., Palo Alto, Calif.
    IRIS will use a solar telescope and spectrograph
    to reveal the dynamics of the solar chromosphere
    and transition region.
  • -- Joint Astrophysics Nascent Universe Satellite
    (JANUS), Principal Investigator Peter W.A.
    Roming, Pennsylvania State University, University
    Park, Penn. JANUS will use a gamma-ray burst
    monitor to point its infrared telescope at the
    most distant galaxies to measure the
    star-formation history of the universe.
  • -- Neutral Ion Coupling Explorer (NICE),
    Principal Investigator Stephen B. Mende,
    University of California, Berkeley, Calif. NICE
    will use a suite of remote sensing and in situ
    instruments to discover how winds and the
    composition of the upper atmosphere drive the
    electrical fields and chemical reactions that
    control the Earth's ionosphere.
  • -- Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS),
    Principal Investigator George R. Ricker,
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge,
    Mass. TESS will use a bank of six telescopes to
    observe the brightest 2.5 million stars and
    discover more than 1,000 Earth-to-Jupiter-sized
    planets around them.

15
Heliophysics SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS (contd)
  • New Millennium Program
  • - ST7 All flight hardware is now at JPL 
  • Solar Terrestrial Probes Program
  • - MMS First Phase B Instrument Quarterly held
    at SwRI 4/9-11
  • Space Weather Workshop 4/28-5/2
  • HP 2008 Senior Review 4/8-11
  • Heliophysics Town Hall Meeting 5/19-20
  • HP Mission Planning Working Group 5/20-21
  • Space Weather Enterprise Forum 5/21

16
C/NOFS Mision
  • NASA contributions to the Communication and
    Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS)
  • Coupled Ion-Neutral Dynamics Investigation
    (CINDI)
  • Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI)
  • Data Analysis Preparation and Archive Support
  • Future C/NOFS Collaborative Research
    Opportunity

17
TWINS - Stereo imager of the Earths magnetosphere
18
IBEX - Mission to Image the Heliosphere
19
MMS Mission Summary
  • Science Objectives
  • Discover the fundamental plasma physics process
    of reconnection in the Earths magnetosphere
  • Temporal scales of milliseconds to seconds
  • Spatial scales of 10s to 100s of km
  • Mission Description
  • 4 identical satellites
  • Formation flying in a tetrahedron
  • 2 year operational mission
  • Orbits
  • Elliptical Earth orbits in 2 phases
  • Phase 1 day side of magnetic field 1.2 RE by
    12 RE
  • Phase 2 night side of magnetic field 1.2 RE
    by 25 RE
  • Significant orbit adjust and formation
    maintenance
  • Instruments
  • Identical in situ instruments on each
    satellite measure
  • Electric and magnetic fields
  • Fast plasma
  • Energetic particles
  • Hot plasma composition
  • Mission Team
  • NASA SMD
  • Southwest Research Institute
  • Science Leadership
  • Instrument Suite
  • Science Operations Center
  • Science Data Processing
  • NASA GSFC
  • Project Management
  • Mission System Engineering
  • Spacecraft
  • Mission Operations Center
  • NASA KSC
  • Launch services


20
SDO Observatory
  • SDO Investigations
  • Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) PI Phil
    Scherrer Stanford Images the Suns
    helioseismic and magnetic fields to understand
    the Suns interior and magnetic activity. LMSAL
    is prime for the instrument.
  • Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Guide
    Telescopes (GT) PI Alan Title LMSAL Multiple
    simultaneous, high-resolution images of the
    corona over a wide range of temperatures.
  • Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE)
    PI Tom Woods LASP, Univ. of CO measures the
    solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance to
    understand variations.
  • Approximate deployed characteristics (current
    best estimates)
  • Mass 3000 kg
  • Power 1000W
  • Width 6 m
  • Height 4.7 m

21
The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission
Radiation Belt Storm Probes twin spacecraft in
highly elliptical orbits to understand the basic
principals behind relativistic particle
acceleration, transport, and loss. Implemented
as the 2nd mission in the Living with a Star
Program
22
NASA SELECTS SMALL EXPLORER INVESTIGATIONS FOR
CONCEPT STUDIES
  • -- Coronal Physics Explorer (CPEX), Principal
    Investigator Dennis G. Socker, Naval Research
    Laboratory, Washington, D.C. CPEX will use a
    solar coronograph to study the processes
    responsible for accelerating the solar wind and
    generating the coronal mass ejections that can
    impact the Earth.
  • -- Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS),
    Principal Investigator Jean H. Swank, Goddard
    Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. GEMS will
    use an X-ray telescope to track the flow of
    highly magnetized matter into supermassive black
    holes.
  • -- Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS),
    Principal Investigator Alan M. Title, Lockheed
    Martin Space Systems Co., Palo Alto, Calif.
    IRIS will use a solar telescope and spectrograph
    to reveal the dynamics of the solar chromosphere
    and transition region.
  • -- Joint Astrophysics Nascent Universe Satellite
    (JANUS), Principal Investigator Peter W.A.
    Roming, Pennsylvania State University, University
    Park, Penn. JANUS will use a gamma-ray burst
    monitor to point its infrared telescope at the
    most distant galaxies to measure the
    star-formation history of the universe.
  • -- Neutral Ion Coupling Explorer (NICE),
    Principal Investigator Stephen B. Mende,
    University of California, Berkeley, Calif. NICE
    will use a suite of remote sensing and in situ
    instruments to discover how winds and the
    composition of the upper atmosphere drive the
    electrical fields and chemical reactions that
    control the Earth's ionosphere.
  • -- Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS),
    Principal Investigator George R. Ricker,
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge,
    Mass. TESS will use a bank of six telescopes to
    observe the brightest 2.5 million stars and
    discover more than 1,000 Earth-to-Jupiter-sized
    planets around them.

23
Heliophysics SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS (contd)
  • New Millennium Program
  • - ST7 All flight hardware is now at JPL 
  • Solar Terrestrial Probes Program
  • - MMS First Phase B Instrument Quarterly held
    at SwRI 4/9-11
  • Space Weather Workshop 4/28-5/2
  • HP 2008 Senior Review 4/8-11
  • Heliophysics Town Hall Meeting 5/19-20
  • HP Mission Planning Working Group 5/20-21
  • Space Weather Enterprise Forum 5/21

24
Sounding Rockets/Range Accomplishments
  • X-Ray Quantum Calorimeter (McCammon) Launch 4/30
  • The mission was successful
  • Utilized one of the few remaining standard Black
    Brant motors performance was nominal
  • Data obtained by all three detector arrays
  • Mesquito Launch
  • Being developed as a low-cost platform to conduct
    mesospheric soundings
  • Flight 1 Launched May 6, 2008
  • Booster motor was tracked, but Dart was not
  • Limited data indicates the dart separated as
    planned, but apogee performance is unknown
  • Flight 2 Launched May 7, 2008
  • Potential structural issue with the fins
  • US Navy Advanced Modular Gun
  • - Six firings on 30 April 2008 successfully
    completed
  • - Impact ranges over 70 nm exceeded previous
    German record

McCammon payload resting on a gypsum dune after
the flight.
Fin Load Test
First flight of Mesquito
25
Heliophysics Administrative
  • Eric Christian returning to GSFC to do science.
  • Chuck Holmes retiring at end of June.

26
Heliophysics UPCOMING EVENTS
  • SDO/LRO deconflict decision requested by KSC by
    May 31
  • SDO Acoustics Test 6/4
  • HP Subcommittee Meeting 6/11-12
  • MMS SDR 6/16-20
  • ST-7 Delivery to ESA 6/20
  • SDO GSE into thermal vac chamber 6/25   Start TV
    7/7, with planned chamber break on 7/23 for
    reconfiguration Complete TV test 8/13
  • Turn off Ulysses not later than 7/1
  • IBEX LRD 9/13
  • Sounding Rocket Missions
  • - Sub-TEC II (Suborbital Technology Experiment
    II), Wallops, June
  • CIBER (Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment),
    WSMR, June
  • RockOn, Wallops, June

27
Other
28
NASA OCE SWx Study
  • Problem Requirements for space weather
    infrastructure are not understood at Agency-level
  • Human explorers (ESMD)
  • Robotic explorers (SMD SOMDTDRSS)
  • Launch activities (SOMD)
  • High-altitude aircraft (ARMD)
  • Solution Ron Turner (ANSER) and O.C. St. Cyr
    (NASA-GSFC) are tasked for one year to
  • Catalogue Agency SWx requirements
  • Comment on three scenarios for a 10-20 year SWx
    architecture
  • Status quo
  • Improved using todays knowledge
  • Ideal within budget realism

29
Operational Space Weather Support to NASA
Missions
30
Demand
Heliosphere
NASA (Human, Robotic, Launch, Aeronautics)
Requirements
Magnetosphere
DoD
Understanding
Commercial and Civil Space
Data
Models
Terrestrial (Power, Navigation, Communications)
NASA SRAG
Operations
NOAA SWPC
DoDAFWA
31
Solar Probe Science June 2008
32
Solar Probe History (1958 - present)
  • Solar Probe studies reports NAS 1962, 1985,
    1995, 2003

33
Science of Solar Probe 2008
  • It is ironic that voyaging spacecraft have
    roughed out the general picture of the solar wind
    region -the heliosphere- with its spiral magnetic
    field and the fast and slow stream interaction
    regions all the way out to the termination shock
    at 100 AU, while the heat sources that create the
    wind are still poorly understood. Eugene Parker,
    2008
  • Two major themes of Solar Probe science
    objectives
  • Coronal heating and solar wind acceleration
  • Production, evolution and transport of Solar
    Energetic Particles
  • Solar Probe will define the inner boundary
    conditions of the solar wind and the heliosphere
    during optimal phases of the solar cycle

34
Science Objectives Solar Probe Plus(ref. 2008
Solar Probe STDT report)
  • Determine the structure and dynamics of the
    magnetic fields at the sources of the fast and
    slow solar wind
  • Trace the flow of energy that heats the corona
    and accelerates the solar wind
  • Determine what mechanisms accelerate and
    transport energetic particles
  • Explore dusty plasma phenomena in the near-Sun
    environment and their influence on the solar wind
    and energetic particle formation

35
Synergy of Heliospheric Mission Assets Solar
Cycle 24 and 25 covered by contemporaneous
missions
Solar Probe perihelia 10Rs at steep upward
slope of Solar Cycle 25
MMS
RBSP
Solar Probe
SDO
Solar Orbiter
36
Solar Probe Plus
First data within 3 months
37
Solar Orbiter History
  • The International Living with a Star (ILWS)
    working group was formed in 2001 to promote
    interagency cooperation/collaboration in
    Heliophysics) missions
  • ESA Solar Orbiter Science Requirements Document
    was released in March 2005.
  • NASA LWS/Solar Sentinels Science and Technology
    Definition Team Report was released in August
    2006
  • Early in 2007, ESA and NASA combined Solar
    Sentinels and Solar Orbiter into a single joint
    collaboration because of the synergy of the two
    missions
  • A joint STDT (JSTDT) was formed and charged with
    prioritizing the science goals for the joint
    collaboration.
  • The JSTDT renamed the merged missions as the
    HELiophysical EXplorers (HELEX) missions.
  • The JSDT released its final report on October 5,
    2007
  • ESA released its Solar Orbiter AO on October 18,
    2007
  • NASA released FOSO as an addendum to the SMEX AO
    on October 22, 2007

38
Mission Design Summary
  • Launch May 21-June 9, 2015 (20 days)
  • Max launch C3 158 km2/s2
  • Flybys 7 Venus flybys
  • Final solar orbit
  • Perihelion 9.5 Rs
  • Aphelion 0.73 AU
  • Inclination 3.4 deg from ecliptic
  • Orbit period 88 days
  • Launch to 1st perihelion 3 months
  • Launch to min perihelion 6.39 years
  • Mission duration (3 passes lt 10 Rs) 6.88 years
  • Max aphelion 0.95 AU
  • No deep space maneuvers
  • Launch mass 610 kg (Atlas V 551 Star 48BV)
  • Delta-V budget 190 m/s (propellant 52.7 kg)

39
SP Orbit Increases Solar Encounter Time
  • Repeated passes give coverage over more than half
    the solar cycle
  • Perihelion walk-in controlled by Venus flybys -
    depth of final perihelion adjustable

10x time spent below 20 Rs over previous mission
designs
40
Solar Orbiter Programmatics
  • ESA's Science Programme Committee approved Solar
    Orbiter in October 2000, and formulation in 2007
    with 2015 notional launch
  • Take images of the Sun both in the visible and
    non-visible wavelengths with equipment similar to
    the SOHO
  • Coverage of the Sun would be out-of-the-
    ecliptic, similar to Ulysses
  • First near Sun observations from low to high
    latitudes
  • In situ measurements and high-resolution imaging
    close to the Sun will advance science of sources
    of coronal mass ejections (CME)
  • Follow-on to SoHo, Ulysses, and Cluster
  • Locate spacecraft above one particular point on
    the Sun for a relatively long period, thus
    enabling a more detailed look than ever before
  • Closest approach 45 solar radii due to heat
    limits on solar panels
  • Venus gravity assists could increase its
    inclination from equatorial to more polar (gt 30
    degrees)

41
Notional NASA/LWS Space Weather Research Network
Far Side Sentinel (2006 STDT Report) carried
magnetograph
Solar Dynamics Observatory
Ionosphere-Thermosphere Storm Probes
Radiation Belt Storm Probes
Near Earth Sentinel (2006 STDT Report)
Inner Heliospheric Sentinels (2006 STDT Report)
Sentinels Science is described in Solar
Sentinels Report of the Science and Technology
Definition Team, August 2006
42
Revised ILWS Space Weather Research Network
Solar Orbiter (2007 JSTDT Report)
Solar Dynamics Observatory
Ionosphere-Thermosphere Storm Probes
Radiation Belt Storm Probes
Inner Heliospheric Sentinels (2007 JSTDT Report)
Science is described in HELEX Heliophysical
Explorers Solar Orbiter and Sentinels Report of
the Joint Science and Technology Definition
Team, 2007
43
Science Importance of Solar Orbiter
  • Energetic particles may arise from multiple
    locations in a complex solar eruption.
  • Each location will have different properties
  • These properties mix together (or average-out)
    as distance from the eruption increases
  • Simultaneous in-situ observations of magnetic
    field lines connecting back to flare sites and to
    shock fronts driven by CMEs are required to
    determine the relative importance of the
    associated acceleration processes
  • Also need concurrent remote imaging of flares,
    wide field-of-view coronagraphy of CMEs
  • and spectroscopic identification of the
    CME-driven shocks

44
Solar Orbiter Mission Summary
  • Mission Profile
  • Launch on Atlas V (Delta IV and Soyuz-Fregat 2-1B
    as back-ups) in mid-2015
  • 3.4 years to reach its Sun-centered orbit,
    approaching as close as 48 solar radii, or 0.22
    AU in 150-day orbit
  • Gravity assists at the Moon, Earth and multiple
    times at Venus to increase inclination
  • Retention of Soyuz option will be addressed in
    technical challenges
  • Spacecraft
  • Single element, 3-axis stabilised, 2 adjustable
    solar arrays
  • Orientation Sun-pointing (heat shield)
  • TM band X/Ka
  • Data volume per orbit 380-430 Gbit
  • Nominal prime mission duration 7-years
  • Operations
  • Mission European Space Operations Centre
    (ESOC), Darmstadt, Germany, using ESAs New
    Norcia (Australia) ground-station
  • Science European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC),
    Madrid, Spain

45
Solar Orbiter Science Goal Objectives
  • Goal Explore the near-Sun environment to
    improve the understanding of
  • How the Sun determines the environment of the
    inner solar system
  • How the Sun generates the heliosphere
  • How fundamental plasma physical processes operate
    near the Sun
  • Science objectives
  • What are the origins of the solar wind streams
    and heliospheric magnetic field?
  • What are the sources, acceleration mechanisms,
    and transport processes of solar energetic
    particles?
  • How do coronal mass ejections evolve in the inner
    heliosphere?
  • To answer these questions, it is essential to
  • Make in situ measurements of the solar wind
    plasma, fields, waves, and energetic particles
  • Make imaging/spectroscopic observations
    close enough to the Sun that they are relatively
    unprocessed

46
Heliospheric Explorers (HELEX) JSTDT
ReportNotional Timeline for 2015 Solar Orbiter
2017 Inner Heliospheric Sentinels (3 S/C)
Launches
47
SMEX Focused Opportunity for Solar Orbiter2007
Proposal Evaluation Process
Preproposal Briefing _at_HQ
AO Released
Receipt of Notices of Intent
TMC Evaluation Kick Off
Receipt of Proposals
10/22/07
11/6/07
11/6/07
Compliance Check of Proposals
TMC Evaluation
TMC Eval Team Meeting
Coordination with ESA Solar Orbiter
Science Merit Technical Merit Evaluation
Science Eval Team Meeting
Categorization Committee _at_ HQ

Space Science Steering Committee _at_ HQ
Selection by SMD AA _at_ HQ
Program Scientist Briefing Package
Debriefings to Proposers

Summer 2008
48
MMS Mission Summary
  • Science Objectives
  • Discover the fundamental plasma physics process
    of reconnection in the Earths magnetosphere
  • Temporal scales of milliseconds to seconds
  • Spatial scales of 10s to 100s of km
  • Mission Description
  • 4 identical satellites
  • Formation flying in a tetrahedron
  • 2 year operational mission
  • Orbits
  • Elliptical Earth orbits in 2 phases
  • Phase 1 day side of magnetic field 1.2 RE by
    12 RE
  • Phase 2 night side of magnetic field 1.2 RE
    by 25 RE
  • Significant orbit adjust and formation
    maintenance
  • Instruments
  • Identical in situ instruments on each
    satellite measure
  • Electric and magnetic fields
  • Fast plasma
  • Energetic particles
  • Hot plasma composition
  • Mission Team
  • NASA SMD
  • Southwest Research Institute
  • Science Leadership
  • Instrument Suite
  • Science Operations Center
  • Science Data Processing
  • NASA GSFC
  • Project Management
  • Mission System Engineering
  • Spacecraft
  • Mission Operations Center
  • NASA KSC
  • Launch services


49
MMS Team
  • Sponsor
  • NASA Science Mission Directorate Heliophysics
    Division
  • MMS Team
  • Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Solving
    Magnetospheric Acceleration, Reconnection, and
    Turbulence (SMART)
  • James Burch from SwRI is the MMS Principal
    Investigator
  • Roy Torbert from UNH is the MMS Deputy PI
  • Instrument Lead Co-Is from UNH (Roy Torbert),
    GSFC (Tom Moore), APL (Barry Mauk), and SwRI
    (Dave Young)
  • Neutralizer from Austria (Klaus Torkar), Theory
    and Modeling from GSFC (Michael Hesse)
  • Science Operations Center from U of Colorado (Dan
    Baker)
  • Education and Public Outreach from Rice
    University (Pat Reiff)
  • International instrument hardware contributions
    from Austria, France, Sweden
  • GSFC
  • Project management (Karen Halterman)
  • Project science (Mel Goldstein)
  • Mission systems engineering (Pete Spidaliere)
  • Spacecraft development and observatory IT
    (Roberto Aleman)
  • Mission Operations Center (Gary Myers)
  • KSC
  • Launch services (Garrett Skrobot)

50
(No Transcript)
51
Instrument Suite Components
ADP - Axial Double Probe AFG - Analog Flux Gate
Magnetometer mounted on boom ASPOC - Active
Spacecraft Potential Control CEB - Central
Electronics Box (Fields) CIDP - Central
Instrument Data Processor DES - Dual Electron
Spectrometer DFG - Digital Flux Gate
Magnetometer mounted on boom DIS - Dual Ion
Spectrometer EDI/GDU - Electron Drift
Instrument/ Gun Detector Unit EIS - Energetic
Ion Spectrometer FEEPS - Flys Eye Energetic
Particle Sensors HPCA - Hot Plasma Composition
Analyzer IDPU - Instrument Data Processing Unit
(FPI) SCM - Search-Coil Magnetometer mounted
on boom SDP - Spin-Plane Double Probe
xx
52
Important Scale Sizes
From simulations
53
System Design
  • Need for 4 spacecraft
  • To identify reconnection events we need to have
    spacecraft in the two inflow regions and in the
    two outflow regions.
  • To determine processes driving reconnection we
    need to have spacecraft within the diffusion
    region.

54
System Design
  • Need for Tetrahedron
  • To determine gradients and vector curls of
    quantities such as magnetic field and plasma
    flows the spacecraft need to be separated in
    3-dimensional space.
  • To determine orientation and velocity of the
    reconnection layer, three spacecraft are needed
    to locate the plane of the layer and a fourth to
    measure its velocity.

55
Solving Magnetospheric Acceleration,
Reconnection, and Turbulence (SMART) Payload
  • The payload consists of the following proven
    instruments
  • Fields
  • Search Coil Magnetometer (heritage from Cluster)
  • Analog Flux Gate Magnetometer (heritage from
    Polar, ST-5)
  • Digital Flux Gate Magnetometer (heritage from
    Equator-S, Rosetta)
  • Electron Drift Instrument (heritage from Cluster)
  • Double-Probe Electric Field (heritage from
    Cluster)
  • Fast Plasma
  • Ion Sensor (heritage from Geotail)
  • Electron Sensor (heritage from Cluster)
  • Hot Plasma Composition (heritage from Cassini,
    DS-1)
  • Energetic Particles
  • Flys Eye Detector (heritage from Cluster, Polar)
  • Energetic Ion Spectrometer (heritage from
    Messenger and Juno)

56
Theory and Modeling
  • Key to the success of the SMART science plan is
    the coupling of theory and observation.
  • The SMART Theory and Modeling Team has developed
    the latest and most sophisticated numerical
    models of the reconnection process.
  • These models have been used to define the SMART
    measurement requirements and guide mission
    design.
  • During the development phase, the models will be
    refined further, and procedures for assimilating
    the SMART data into the models will be defined.
  • In the mission operations and data analysis
    phase, the Theory and Modeling team will work
    closely with the instrument scientists to ensure
    optimum science return.

57
Summary
  • MMS will provide the highest spatial and temporal
    resolution yet attained in any space physics
    mission.
  • The four payloads will sample reconnection
    regions with separations and data rates
    sufficient to determine the kinetic processes
    responsible for magnetic reconnection.
  • The most critical region to be probed is the
    electron diffusion region within which specific
    predictions about the electric fields, currents,
    and electron dynamics will be tested.
  • The measurement requirements are based on
    theoretical results from the latest reconnection
    models as well as on recent measurements from
    Cluster and Polar.

58
The Radiation Belt Storm Probes
MissionResolving fundamental physical
processes with practical consequences.
New View DYNAMIC
59
How are Earths Radiation Belts created?
  • RBSP answers long-standing and critically
    important space physics questions
  • Provides the in situ observations needed to
    understand particle acceleration processes that
    occur throughout the plasma universe

60
The processes studied affect engineering
environments throughout the solar system
  • RBSP defines the Earths radiation belts,
    environments within which we must engineer and
    even live.

61
A new approach is needed multipoint sampling is
critical to answering radiation belt questions
  • Simultaneous, multipoint sampling at various
    spatial scales reveals source and evolution of
    critical features.
  • High quality, integrated measurements.
  • The RBSP mission targets Earths radiation belts
    with multipoint (2 spacecraft), integrated, high
    resolution measurements
  • The scientific objective understand, ideally to
    the point of predictability, how populations of
    relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in
    space form or change in response to the variable
    inputs of energy from the Sun
  • Developing this level of science requires an
    integrated set of observations to resolve
    fundamental questions persisting since the dawn
    of the space age.

62
RBSP Investigations were selected to meet
science objectives
63
Recent Developments
  • 1. Cost saving exercise in Fall 2007.
  • Reduced management and reviews
  • Simplified s/c design, removed redundancy
  • Enhanced reserves
  • Accelerated Schedule (launch October 2011)
  • 2. Mission currently undergoing PDR reviews that
    will culminate in October 2008 and transition
    into Phase C in early 2009.

64
Backup
65
Heliophysics SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS
  • Explorers Program
  • Confirmed TWINS-B launch on March 13, 2008
  • SMEX AO concept study selections underway
  • CINDI/C/NOFS All instruments are operational 5/23
  • IBEX Completed Pre-ship Review 4/19
  • On range for NET 9/13/08 launch from Reagan Test
    Site, Kwajalein Atoll
  • Living With a Star Program
  • RBSP spacecraft subsystem peer reviews initiated
  • Solar Orbiter MoO proposals (13) evaluation
    continuing
  • BARREL SRR 5/8
  • Solar Probe - Finalized Solar Probe mission
    delegation letter and draft Formulation
    Authorization Document
  • SET EMI/EMC and vibration testing completed
  • Solar Dynamics Observatory
  • Completed Observatory EMI/EMC Testing- no EM
    related issues
  • Completed LPSC repair, re-integration and testing
  • Completed post-LPSC-repair Functional Test
  • Observatory vibe testing underway
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