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Vision 2020

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Wildcat Connections at FSMS Mentoring targeted at-risk students making connections. ... tutoring programs through the African-American Heritage House and ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Vision 2020


1
Vision 2020 Clear Focus on Student Learning
Teamwork, Positive Community Relations, and No
Excuses
  • SUCCESS FOR ALL!
  • Simpson County Schools is a top-ranked learning
    community that graduates thoughtful, productive,
    and caring citizens who are prepared to succeed
    in a global and ever-changing society.

2
Our CORE BUSINESS
  • Our CORE BUSINESS is to ensure that every
    student, every day of the school year is provided
    challenging, interesting, and satisfying work and
    leading them to success in that work with a
    consistent focus on RELATIONSHIPS, RELEVANCE,
    RIGOR, RESPONSIBILITY
  • We must spend time getting to know build
    rapport with our students, because positive
    professional relationships are the foundation for
    learning in schools - RELATIONSHIPS.
  • Designing work that is interesting and produces a
    sense of satisfaction for our students -
    RELEVANCE
  • Designing work that is challenging and with which
    students persist even when they experience
    difficulty - RIGOR
  • For this to occur, all district activity must be
    organized around students, their success and the
    work they do OUR RESPONSIBILITY.

3
Questions for our work
  • How can we help each child reach his or her true
    potential?
  • How can we inspire each child and adolescent to
    discover his or her inner passion to learn?
  • How can we honor the unique journey of each
    individual through life?
  • How can we inspire our students to develop into
    mature adults?

4
Questions for our work
  • Do we have a clear plan for building positive,
    professional relationships with students and
    their parents?
  • Do we have clear procedures for making sure we
    are teaching the standards?
  • Do we have clear procedures for making sure our
    students have learned the standards?
  • Do we have clear procedures for making sure we
    fix it when students do not learn the
    standards?
  • Do we have clear procedures for providing
    enrichment strategies for students who are
    already meeting our learning goals?

5
  • We already know
  • what we need to
  • do. Whether or not
  • we do it must finally
  • depend on how we feel about
  • the fact that we havent so far.
  • Ron Edmonds, 1982

6
In 1903 the U.S. Congress passed a special bill
forbidding the Army to spend any more money on
trying out flying machines.
7
Everything that can be invented has been
invented.Charles H. Duell, Director of the U.S.
Patent Office 1939
8
Sensible and responsible women do not want to
vote.Grover Cleveland, 1905
9
A Story.
  • Not a bad idea, but to earn a grade more than a
    C the idea has to be viable! (Yale Professor)
  • Fredrick Smith
  • The idea FedEx

10
Why is this work so important?
  • 75 OF NEW JOB GROWTH REQUIRES SOME LEVEL OF
    POST-SECONDARY TRAINING

11
Thats Good, Because Education Pays 2000 U.S.
Median Earnings
Source U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Public Use
Microdata Samples (based on the 2000 Decennial
Census)
12
Study High school dropouts face steeper costs in
U.S.POSTED 1118 a.m. EDT, September 12, 2006
  • Dropping out of high school has its costs around
    the globe, but nowhere steeper than in the United
    States.
  • Adults who don't finish high school in the U.S.
    earn 65 percent of what people who have high
    school degrees make, according to a new report
    comparing industrialized nations.
  • An adult with a university degree in the U.S.
    earns, on average, 72 percent more than someone
    with a high school degree.

13
Growing Need for Higher Levels of Education
Projections of Education Shortages and Surpluses
in 2012
Shortage
Surplus
Bachelors Degree
Associates Degree
Some College
Source Analysis by Anthony Carnevale, 2006 of
Current Population Survey (1992-2004) and Census
Population Projection Estimates
14
Even if you have your doubts about college, new
ACT study says
  • Prepared for college and prepared for workforce
    training are the SAME THING.

15
  • District Scholastic Review Report 2007
  • The Kentucky Department of Education conducted a
    District Scholastic Review in March 2007. The
    report outlined four recommendations/next steps

16
  • District leadership should immediately establish
    a process, including a monitoring system, to
    align and continuously renew the district
    curriculum. Data, including classroom assessment
    results, should be used to identify gaps in the
    curriculum as it is implemented.
  • We have completed phase 1 of developing our
    updated district curriculum. We will continue
    our work through on-going planned sessions to
    further develop our curriculum to include
    resources, sample units and assessments around
    each content standard.
  • We will be implementing next year district-wide
    learning checks or scrimmages to monitor student
    progress on our district curriculum. We are
    planning these learning checks at a minimum
    standard quarterly.
  • Pre/Post testing in Reading and Math in Grades
    K-10 for all students. K-3 students will take
    the GRADE and GMADE Tests Grades 4-10 will take
    the MAP Test. These assessments will provide
    diagnostic information that will help teachers
    deliver targeted instruction to meet individual
    learner needs.
  • Our Professional Learning Community (PLC) Work
    will bring teachers together in collegial work
    groups to analyze student work and results on
    classroom assessments and use the data to inform
    instruction, share and celebrate successful
    strategies, as well as identify students who need
    remediation or enrichment in an area.

17
  • District leadership should use a variety of
    methods to gauge the status of the existing
    district and school cultures. Results of the
    methods should be used to determine strategies to
    implement that foster a culture conducive to
    performance excellence. All staff should be held
    responsible for the success of all students.
  • We will continue monitoring student attendance,
    discipline reports, grade distributions, drop-out
    rates.
  • We will more closely monitor staff attendance as
    an indicator as well.
  • We will implement surveys of staff, students and
    parents to gauge our culture and performance
    perceptions among stakeholders. We will use this
    information to monitor our culture and develop
    strategies for improving it on behalf of our
    students.

18
  • District leadership should hold school
    leadership accountable for staffs effective use
    of planning time using the most current
    curriculum standards to develop lesson plans and
    units of study.
  • We will continue our work with Thoughtful
    Education, refining our efforts to design effect
    lessons and units of study around the district
    curriculum. We will use time during the work-day
    for job embedded staff development to work on
    this and other important initiatives for raising
    student achievement.

19
  • District leadership should collaborate with
    school leadership to ensure all schools have the
    required school council policies defined in KRS
    160.345. District leadership should provide
    support to ensure that policies are focused on
    student achievement, are fully implemented, and
    fully monitored for impact on student
    achievement.
  • We will continue to partner with SBDM Councils as
    we pursue excellence in student learning for each
    child we serve through our joint meetings between
    the Board of Education and SBDM Councils.

20
PLC Work Initiative
  • Building Professional Learning Communities in
    and among our schools Educators working
    together to accomplish our mission of success for
    all students we serve.

21
PLC Work Initiative
  • What are we going to require from our teachers in
    our PLC meetings?
  • Classroom Assessments (with Scoring Guides)
    aligned to the Simpson County Curriculum
  • Analyze Student Work with teacher feedback
    hi/med/low work samples
  • Documentation of effective planning tied to
    Simpson County Curriculum Document Unit Plans
  • Teacher Reflection
  • What did I learn? How will I use these results
    to inform instruction to improve student success
    and learning?
  • What interventions are needed for individual
    students not meeting our learning goals?
  • What enrichment strategies are needed for
    students who already are meeting our learning
    goals?

22
PLC Work Initiative
  • When will this work take place?
  • We will use time during the school day and at
    faculty meetings for this important work. Most
    schools are already conducting team meetings and
    grade-level meetings during the day or right
    after school.
  • A well planned and intentional program must be
    designed at each school in order to do this work
    at a minimum standard of once per month.

23
Vision 2020 Clear Focus on Student Learning
Teamwork, Positive Community Relations, and No
Excuses
  • We have a plan for building positive,
    professional relationships with students and
    their parents.
  • We have procedures for making sure we are
    teaching the standards The Simpson County
    Curriculum.
  • We have procedures for making sure our students
    have learned the standards Learning Checks and
    PLC Work.
  • We have procedures for making sure we fix it
    when students do not learn the standards
    Multiple Interventions.

24
Minimum Classroom Expectations for Teachers
Simpson County Schools
  • All teachers will use effective planning
    strategies to ensure all students are taught the
    Simpson County Schools Curriculum.
  • Evidence unit/lesson plans, PLC Work sessions,
    classroom observations
  • All teachers will use effective classroom
    assessment strategies aligned to the curriculum
    to include
  • At least one quality open-response item and
    scoring guide as part of every unit.
  • Quality multiple-choice items as part of every
    unit.
  • Writing assessment that is imbedded in the
    classroom instructional program to include
    authentic writing opportunities for on-demand and
    writing portfolio assessments in every class
    except math unless required by the school.
  • Performance assessments with associated scoring
    guides/rubrics, when applicable, so students can
    demonstrate their learning in authentic ways.
  • Evidence assessment reviews, PLC Work
    sessions, classroom observations

25
Minimum Classroom Expectations for Teachers
Simpson County Schools
  • All teachers will use effective, varied,
    research-based instructional strategies such as
    Thoughtful Classroom Strategies on a regular
    basis that are aligned to the curriculum and
    classroom assessment strategies.
  • Evidence classroom observations, unit/lesson
    plans
  • All teachers will regularly use
    higher-order/critical thinking learning tasks
    based on Blooms taxonomy and critical thinking
    concepts.
  • Evidence assessment reviews, PLC Work
    sessions, classroom observations, unit/lesson
    plans
  • All teachers will teach reading and writing
    across the curriculum.
  • Evidence assessment reviews, PLC Work
    sessions, classroom observations, unit/lesson
    plans

26
Minimum Classroom Expectations for Teachers
Simpson County Schools
  • All teachers will ensure their students know the
    following everyday (Clear Expectations)
  • What they are learning
  • Why it is important
  • How to judge their work for quality
  • Evidence classroom observations/walk-throughs,
    unit/lesson plans
  • All teachers will utilize technology as part of
    their instructional program to enhance student
    learning.
  • Evidence classroom observations, unit/lesson
    plans

27
Minimum Classroom Expectations for Teachers
Simpson County Schools
  • All teachers will implement a plan for building
    positive, professional relationships with
    students and their parents, as well as a positive
    classroom learning environment.
  • Behavioral Academic Expectations are very clear
    and shared with students and parents.
  • Get to know your students names and their
    interests ASAP. Show them you genuinely care for
    them and their well-being.
  • Parent engagement and communication on a
    planned/regular basis to enhance student learning
    - 100 Parent communications at Open House and
    Parent-Teacher Conferences face-to-face, phone,
    email, home visits
  • Evidence Parent Contact Logs, Course/Class
    Syllabi, survey data, discipline data, attendance
    data, grade distribution data, classroom
    observations

28
What are we doing to IMPROVE and provide
resources for INTERVENTIONS?
  • Thoughtful Classroom Initiative
  • Research-based Instructional Strategies
  • Hidden Skills of Academic Literacy
  • Diversity of Learning Meeting Students
    Individual Learning Styles
  • Focus on Literacy Reading Achievement
  • Title 1 Program is focused on students exiting
    primary reading on grade level or above.
  • All students K-10 tested in reading at the
    beginning and end of year to measure growth and
    inform instruction.

29
What are we doing to IMPROVE and provide
resources for INTERVENTIONS?
  • Focus on Literacy Reading Achievement
  • Accelerated Reading Programs to supplement
    reading instruction
  • Rock Rule Program at SES to Raise Reading
    Achievement
  • FSMS using SRA Reading Program to help students
    read better and implementing Achieve 3000 this
    school year
  • Family Literacy Cooperative through our Adult
    Education Program working with families to help
    children with reading
  • Instructional Coaches, ESS Daytime Coaches and
    Reading Specialists help students learn to read.

30
What are we doing to IMPROVE and provide
resources for INTERVENTIONS?
  • Use of ESS Funds to Provide More Help to
    Students
  • Instructional Coaches to provide targeted
    assistance for students who need extra help
    meeting our learning goals
  • Before and After School Programs for Tutoring and
    Extra Assistance Homework Help Programs
  • Support for Math Education
  • Teachers participating in professional
    development initiatives in Math Math Alliance,
    Algebra 1 Initiative

31
What are we doing to IMPROVE and provide
resources for INTERVENTIONS?
  • Support for Math Education
  • All students K-10 tested in math at the beginning
    and end of year to measure growth and inform
    instruction.
  • FSMS and FSHS offer remediation programs in math
  • Curriculum, Instruction, And Assessment
    Specialists in every school to support teaching
    and learning

32
What are we doing to IMPROVE and provide
resources for INTERVENTIONS?
  • Special Education Programs to provide students
    with disabilities with the supports they need to
    meet high learning goals.
  • Family Resource Center for the Elementary Schools
    to support families for student learning success
    and break down barriers to learning.
  • Youth Service Centers at FSMS and FSHS to help
    ALL students achieve success and reduce barriers
    to learning.
  • School Social Worker/Student Assistance
    Coordinator at FSMS/FSHS to reduce barriers to
    learning.

33
What are we doing to IMPROVE and provide
resources for INTERVENTIONS?
  • Intensive Mentoring Program at FSMS/FSHS to make
    connections and support at-risk students.
  • Wildcat Connections at FSMS Mentoring targeted
    at-risk students making connections.
  • Clubs and Organizations at schools, particularly
    FSHS FSMS making connections with students
  • Technology to enhance learning infusion of new
    computers throughout our schools, SMART Classroom
    Technologies in many classrooms

34
What are we doing to IMPROVE and provide
resources for INTERVENTIONS?
  • Community Partnerships
  • Franklin-Simpson Educational Excellence
    Foundation
  • Junior Achievement
  • Character Education
  • Boys Girls Club
  • After school tutoring programs through the
    African-American Heritage House and Harvestors
    Warehouse Pentecostal Church and hopefully
    more.
  • And many others

35
What are we doing to IMPROVE and provide
resources for INTERVENTIONS?
  • Parent Involvement Programs
  • Lil Cats Programs
  • Open Houses
  • PTOs
  • Parent-Teacher Conference Days
  • Internet Access to Student Grades and other Data
  • Web Sites www.simpson.k12.ky.us
  • Channel 9 educational cable access channel
  • New Volunteer Programs through Community Education

36
In almost every field people begin to learn
something quickly and with energy, then more
slowly and then they stop.
37
The best people in any field are those who devote
the most hours to what researchers call
deliberate practice. Its activity thats
explicitly intended to improve performance by
reaching for objectives just beyond ones level
of competence.
38
Senge suggests that those unpredictable,
unplanned-for factors that seem to get in the
way, are in fact not merely things that get in
the way, THEY ARE NORMAL!!!! And everyone in the
system needs to know this.
39
  • We already know
  • what we need to
  • do. Whether or not
  • we do it must finally
  • depend on how we feel about
  • the fact that we havent so far.
  • Ron Edmonds, 1982

40
WORKING TOGETHER,WE Will Make It Happen!
  • Vision 2020 Clear Focus on Student Learning
    Teamwork, Positive Community Relations, and No
    Excuses
  • KIDS Matter Most!
  • KM²
  • Have a terrific school year!
  • OUR STUDENTS ARE WORTH OUR BEST EFFORT!
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