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New Markets and distribution channels

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Title: New Markets and distribution channels


1
New Markets and distribution channels
  • Broadcast and Telecommunications Summit
  • ForgeAhead
  • 28-30th August 2006
  • John Joslin
  • 082-969-2497
  • johnjoslin_at_mweb.co.za

2
Contents
  • The last ten years-narrowband
  • The next ten years broadband
  • Why IP and Broadband?
  • Technology and Moores law
  • Why Digital TV?
  • Digital TV - DVB
  • Digital TV - IPTV
  • Network Components
  • Interacting networks
  • DVB deployments
  • IPTV deployments
  • DTV for e-Government

3
The last ten years
4
The last ten years -narrowband
  • Remarkable
  • Completely unexpected
  • The best expert forecasts were way too low.
  • The Internet
  • World has 800 million users
  • South Africa about 3-4 million
  • Mobile Cellular networks
  • World has 2 billion users
  • South Africa about 20 million

5
The last ten years- narrowband
  • Both the Internet and the mobile cellular
    networks in the first ten years were mainly
    narrowband networks
  • From 5kbps to 128kbps
  • This restricted the use to mainly text material,
    newspapers magazines, white papers and billions
    of pages of text.
  • The next ten years will be the era of broadband
    Internet.
  • 1Mbps to 10 mbps to 100mbps at the end of the ten
    years.
  • This will allow the distribution of video, TV,
    Movies, music, online grid computing or computing
    on demand, and millions of other applications.
  • Major challenge to traditional TV broadcasters

6
The last ten years-narrowband
  • The narrowband Internet and mobiles were
    dramatically disruptive technologies
  • Many traditional telcos went bankrupt- Worldcom
    and many others.
  • The Internet was a complete winner both the
    fixed and mobile networks are moving to IP
    protocols
  • The traditional telcos are writing off and
    replacing Rtrillions of plant worldwide.
  • BT closing down all old TDM/circuit switched and
    ATM networks and replacing it with all-IP
  • 80 of old telcos are doing the same.

7
The next ten years
8
The next ten years- broadband
  • Everybody gets next generation Internet access
  • Internet with improved quality and security
  • All the networks become the new Internet
  • Cellular phones become wireless Internet access
    providers ( WIAP)
  • Telcos become high quality and more expensive
    Internet access providers (IAPs)
  • The richness of the services improves and the
    coverage grows to 3 billion

9
The next ten years - broadband
  • New and upgraded infrastructure
  • DWDM on fiber
  • Broadband cellular- 3G and 3G evolved
  • Broadband Internet
  • Enterprise networks
  • Power-line communications broadband powerline
  • WiFi and WiMAX
  • Broadband digital terrestrial IPDatacast TV
  • Broadband two-way satellite

10
The next ten years - broadband
  • Converting narrowband to broadband depends on
    progress in solid state and quantum physics and
    chip technology.
  • Modems or boxes of highly complicated IC
    technology and memory manipulate frequencies,
    waves, time slices, compression, NLOS, encryption
    etc and convert narrowband twisted pair or air
    interface into MBPS broadband.
  • Similar IC technology is used with all the
    pipes and air-interfaces and all advance to
    higher bandwidths as ICs advance.

11
The next ten years - broadband
  • The world is moving to Ubiquitous communications
    based on
  • Internet protocol (IP) as a seamless transport.
  • SIP ( Session Initiation Protocol) for session
    setup and management.
  • These protocols will allow for seamless
    interoperation between
  • Mobile cellular networks
  • Fixed line operators
  • The Internet
  • Internal enterprise networks
  • This will enable converged, seamless, rich
    communications between mobiles, fixed, Internet
    and enterprises.

12
The next ten years- broadband
  • Richer, integrated and more valuable
    communications.
  • Voice, video and data on the same network
  • Much more value carried on lower cost networks
  • At a lower cost to the operator and price to the
    consumer.
  • New technology
  • Competition
  • Standardization
  • Open layered architecture
  • Globalization and mass production
  • PC type economics
  • It comes as a surprise that none of this applied
    to traditional telephone networks.

13
The next ten years-broadband
  • The world will have 3 billion with mobile
    wireless Internet access
  • 1 billion broadband mobile wireless Internet
    access
  • South Africa will have 30 million mobile wireless
    Internet access
  • South Africa 15 million broadband mobile wireless
    Internet access
  • The world will have 1.5 billion fixed line
    Internet access
  • South Africa will have 10 million fixed line
    internet access

14
The next ten years-broadband
  • The NGN Internet will carry real-time telephony
    and other rich applications as well as the world
    wide web.
  • The transport or connectivity (electronic pipes)
    suppliers will be separate businesses from the
    Service providers and content providers
  • Sentech is the wireless pipe vs SABC is the
    Service and Content provider.

15
The next ten years - broadband
  • The NGN Internet will transmit a variety of
    services and content from anywhere in the world.
  • Telephony
  • Instant messaging
  • IPTV
  • SMS
  • Email
  • Video on demand
  • Newspapers
  • Unicast, broadcast and multicast
  • Etc.etc.etc.

16
The next ten years-broadband
  • Customer has choice of what pipe to choose.
  • Choice of Telkom, SNO, TNO, mobiles like Vodacom,
    MTN, Sentech, etc and ISA ( Internet access
    providers)
  • Other sources of revenue for ex-telcos will have
    to be in fair competition to all other service
    and content providers.
  • Telkom SP and CP will need license ( class
    license) to feed SABC content using multicast to
    DSL users.
  • Sentech broadcast and Sentech ISP could also sell
    TV feed from SABC..

17
The next ten years-broadband
  • All the 3 billion users of the world will access
    the global NGN ( Internet) via their local
    pipes .Mostly ex-Telcos and Ex-cellular
    operators and ISPs. These are the access
    networks.
  • Many ex-telcos and now Network operators will own
    the global core network, which will be mainly
    fibre optic cable but also Satellite.
  • There must be interconnection between the Core
    networks.
  • Could be peering like the Internet. They swop
    traffic freely.
  • Or Interconnection monitoring and payments. Like
    Telcos now.
  • The core network will accept any type of access
    network.

18
The next ten years-broadband
  • Services and content from anywhere in the world.
  • Search and find
  • persons
  • newspapers
  • TV programs
  • Video
  • Movies
  • Business
  • Books
  • Software
  • Now on Google, search for videos on demand via
    the Internet.Content from Warner Brothers.
  • Find and see streaming TV, or download and pay
    0.50 per movie. ( streaming too slow now).

19
The next ten years-broadband
  • TV
  • SABC is a content provider
  • Moving to digital video origination
  • World Cup want HDTV
  • But most of the population will not be able to
    afford new TV sets
  • SABC could multicast digital IPTV to the country
    via Sentech, Telkom, SNO, Mweb, Internet
    solutions and Vodacom and MTN etc
  • Could multicast digital TV to Telkom, SNO and
    Internet.
  • Could multicast TV to 3G mobiles

20
The next ten years-broadband
  • The viewer will be able to receive TV, video and
    movies on
  • Home and office (?) PC
  • Notebook
  • TV with set top box
  • 3G mobile computer phone.
  • Wireless office phone
  • Sufficient should be in place by 2010 to have a
    real pilot or launch.

21
The next ten years-broadband
  • SABC could broadcast to the world with IPTV
  • BT, DT, FT and many of the South American
    Internet operators and those in Europe Asia will
    have IPTV.
  • SABC could provide Football feed, in realtime or
    delayed to all these Internet IPTV operators
  • This will be wonderful test. Who could want
    better than a World Cup.!!
  • Advertising revenue
  • Work with Google to get targetted advertising to
    soccer fans.

22
The next ten years-broadband
  • South Africa viewer will have access to the world
    TV. Videos and movies cheaply
  • Just as SABC could multicast TV to the world
    using IPTV so the world could sell TV and video
    to South Africans.
  • As we roll out the NGN ( Next generation Network)
    and broadband Telkom, SNO, ISPs, and mobile
    cellphone networks will be able to deliver any
    TV, or Video or Movie or Music from the world.
  • Google has a video search and stream and
    download.
  • Google charge 0.50 for most downloadable movies.
  • In future access any TV channel? Subscribe or pay
    per view.
  • My son tested it on his ADSL line and flatscreen
    TV set.

23
The next ten years-broadband
  • Main features of electronic communications over
    the next ten years
  • New pipes, such as PLC, broadband satellite, WiFi
    and WiMAX get deployed.
  • The last mile goes broadband
  • Packets (typically IP packets) allow many
    services to share the same pipes
  • The unit costs of such services declines
  • Convergence. TV , music and data share the same
    networks as voice and video communications.
  • All become more affordable.

24
The next ten years-broadband
  • The following networks support or are moving to
    broadband IP transport
  • Fixed line networks old telcos
  • Cellulars - mobiles
  • Internet Skype
  • Yahoo
  • MSN
  • Enterprise networks
  • Digital TV IPDC IP data casting.

25
The next ten years-broadband
  • The following networks support or are moving to
    IP transport
  • E-Government networks
  • Government incentives for its own universal
    services.
  • Digital cities
  • Powerline Communications
  • Satellite
  • DVB-S2 leap forward
  • Interaction between networks.

26
Why IP and Broadband?
27
Why IP and Broadband?
  • Why broadband?
  • Advance of chip technology allows more bandwidth
    over legacy connections.
  • Users always want more bandwidth for an
    affordable price
  • Competition between networks, such as cable vs
    telco and cellulars vs fixed line.
  • Packet switching with broadband enable multimedia
    and many services over the same connection. Eg
    triple play.

28
Broadband
  • The last mile determines what services can be
    offered
  • Broadband opens up many new possibilities
  • Broadband plus packet switching
  • Digital TV- IPTV

29
Why IP and Broadband?
  • Why affordable?
  • Open global standards
  • Mass markets and mass production
  • Globalisation and worldwide economic boom
  • China and India
  • Moores law. Double in power every 18 months for
    the same price
  • Competition
  • Packets allow many services to share one network.

30
Technology and Moores law
31
Technology forecasts
  • In sixties Moore said that every two years the
    power and capacity of chips will double for the
    same cost
  • Moores law continues
  • Advances in the area of silicon technology
    continue to follow Moores Law. The International
    Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS)
    reported that the silicon geometry of CPUs and
    ASICs entering into production in 1998 was 250nm
    in 2000, it had shrunk to 180nm 2000 in 2002,
    130nm in 2004, 90nm and the projected geometry
    in 2007 is 65nm.1 Ordinarily, the geometries of
    ultra-low-power processes appear in commercial
    phones one to two years after they have been
    perfected. 1
  • 1 . Ericsson. Ericsson Review. Multi-media in
    mobile phones. 2004.

32
Technology forecasts
  • Gilders law for communications
  • Electronic communications improve faster than
    chips
  • Moores law plus continues
  • It is widely believed that Moores law plus
    operates for electronic communications. Fibre
    optics with Dense Wave Division multiplexing
    (DWDM) is exapanding the existing fibre optics
    cable capacity by factors of ten or even one
    hundred without laying extra cables.
  • During the late nineties boom enormous amount of
    fibre was deployed much of it so-called unlit
    which means unused.
  • Much of this cable plant was bought at bargain
    prices when many network companies went bankrupt.
  • In most countries there is ample fibre capacity.

33
Technology forecasts
  • Moores law plus continues
  • Besides the fibre optic cables the other elements
    of a modern IP network are the router/switchers,
    , gateways, soft-switchers and servers.
  • These are all in effect computers and use memory
    and processors . These are subject to Moores
    law.
  • This massive improvement is expected to continue
    for a decade or two
  • So not only will the end-user devices get more
    powerful and cheaper so will the networks..

34
Technology forecasts
  • Memory capacity
  • Two main types of memory are found in mobile
    phones non-volatile program and data storage,
    and fast-access random access memory (RAM), for
    active software. Today, however, more and more
    manufacturers are replacing NOR flash memory with
    not-and NAND) flash memory, which is denser and
    yields substantially greater capacity from the
    same silicon area. In addition, NAND flash memory
    has a substantially lower cost per
    megabytetypically one-third to one sixth that of
    NOR flash memory 1
  • 1 . Ericsson. Ericsson Review. Multi-media in
    mobile phones. 2004.

35
Technology forecasts
  • Memory cards
  • Apart from built-in NAND flash memory, many
    phones also accommodate memory cards, which can
    substantially increase memory capacity. Today,
    many memory cards are based on NAND flash
    memory. 1
  • 1 . Ericsson. Ericsson Review. Multi-media in
    mobile phones. 2004.

36
Technology forecasts
  • Memory will not be a problem for future computer
    phones.
  • Memory cards with a capacity of 2GB are now
    available, and 512MB memory cards cost less than
    USD 100. By 2007, a 2GB memory card will probably
    cost less than USD 100. Furthermore, microdrive
    technologies will soon allow for even greater
    memory capacity. In summary, memory capacity in
    mobile phones will not pose a significant
    obstacle for the multimedia evolution. 1
  • 1 . Ericsson. Ericsson Review. Multi-media in
    mobile phones. 2004.

37
Technology forecasts
  • Processing performance
  • Advancements in silicon technology and processor
    architecture are opening the way for vastly
    improved CPU performance. Some algorithms are
    demanding in terms of performance but are well
    suited for hardware acceleration. Typical
    candidates for hardware acceleration include
    video coding, graphics, and cryptography. 1
  • 1 . Ericsson. Ericsson Review. Multi-media in
    mobile phones. 2004.

38
Technology forecasts
39
Technology forecasts
40
Technology forecasts
41
Technology forecasts
42
Technology forecasts
  • Meanwhile one chip is capable of processing
    billions of DSP operations and route millions of
    packets per second. As a side-effect prices of
    Ethernet switches are dropping already and might
    soon reach a level below 100 US- per port.
    McQuillan is even more optimistic he believes
    that soon Ethernet switching will cost only about
    15 US- per port.

43
Technology Forecasts
  • "Moore's Law is absolutely alive and well," says
    Paul Otellini, incoming CEO of Intel Corp.,
    referring to the 40-year-old premise that
    processing power doubles every 18 months.
    Otellini kicked off this year's FOSE trade show
    in Washington by addressing critics who have said
    Moore's Law has hit a wall. He said Intel's
    dual-core Itanium 2 server processor, due out
    this year, will have 1.7 billion transistors,
    making it the company's first billion-transistor
    part and proving Moore's Law still has legs.

44
Technology Forecasts
  • In fact, Otellini said in his keynote address,
    Intel has a road map for four generations of
    processor platforms, which will eventually take
    the company to a 15-nanometer manufacturing
    process. Nanometers describe the average size of
    features on a chip. Today's processors largely
    use 90-nanometer technology, while Intel plans to
    introduce 65-nanometer-based chips this year.

45
Technology forecasts
  • Intel also believes the wide-area wireless
    networking technology WiMax will help governments
    improve broadband access for citizens and enhance
    agencies' ability to work anywhere. Otellini said
    there are currently more than 100 cities
    worldwide piloting WiMax networks. In a Georgia
    city he declined to name, Otellini said the local
    government was able to cover 200 square miles
    with wireless connectivity for about 20,000.

46
Technology forecasts
  • 'M HERE AT THE NATIONAL Association of
    Broadcasters' NAB 2006 show in Las Vegas, with
    80,000 of my closest friends. On the tech side,
    it may look like business as usual--but if you
    know what you're looking at, you can clearly see
    that versions of Moore's Law and Metcalfe's Law
    are actually starting to change the way the
    broadcast business operates. In my first hour
    touring the show floor on Monday, I did not meet
    anyone who didn't use the word "broadband" in a

47
Technlogy forecasts
  • "Moore's Law made it possible for everyone to
    have a PC and put cell phones in pockets
    worldwide," said Dushyant Desai, vice president
    of marketing at Ishoni Networks, a chip-maker
    primarily focused on the digital-subscriber-line
    and Voice-over-DSL equipment sector.
  • "Our vision is to bring broadband to everyone,"
    Desai said. "We are relying on Moore's Law to
    lower costs and add functionality to the silicon."

48
Technology Forecasts
  • we're now in the Age of Mobility, governed by
    the Law of Mobility. Thanks to cost reductions of
    Moore's Law, scalability resulting from
    Metcalfe's Law, convergence and miniaturization
    of devices and increasing ubiquity of 3G wireless
    networks, the cost of making any product
    (especially one involving information) available
    all the time is plummeting. Therefore, McGuire
    concludes, just as computing power and the
    Internet have been built into virtually every
    product, mobility is beginning to be built into
    every product.

49
Technology Forecasts
  • The Law of Mobility states that the value of any
    product or service increases exponentially with
    mobility. McGuire points to the TV set. If one
    were to graph price vs. display size, with the
    3,500 42-inch plasmas at one end, all the way
    down to the 5-inch, black-and-white handheld
    AM/FM units that you can get for about 30, then
    you'd think that a 2-inch screen on your cell
    phone would be worth about 20. Yet users will
    pay far in excess of this - including monthly and
    even per-show fees - to be able to squeeze in
    their favorite sitcom while riding home on the
    subway.

50
Technology Forecasts
  • The key to the measure of mobility is the
    increase in the percent of time the product is
    available for use. A smartphone with Windows
    Mobile has a premium that approaches the cost of
    a desktop computer even though it has far less
    screen real estate, far less memory, virtually no
    disk space and poor excuses for Word, Excel and
    PowerPoint, but it's with you 100 of the time.
      Continued

51
Technology forecasts
  • The challenge for IT is to figure out how to help
    your firm build mobility into products to add
    exponential value. You deployed the PCs during
    the Age of the PC you networked everything you
    could during the Age of the Internet. Now, during
    the Age of Mobility, the strategic thinkers are
    asking, "What are you doing to mobilize your
    products on behalf of your company?" It's an IT
    manager's dream world.

52
Technology Forecasts
  • SAN FRANCISCO--Moore's Law will boost chip
    abilities for many years to come, Intel CEO Craig
    Barrett predicted on Tuesday.
  • The momentum will be kept up first through
    conventional manufacturing processes, then for
    many years after that by other technology, he
    said in a keynote speech at the Intel Developer
    Forum here.
  • Barrett predicted that traditional chipmaking
    technology will permit features as small as 5
    nanometers--about the width of 50 hydrogen
    atoms--to be used on processors.

53
Technology forecasts
  • Metcalfe's Law attributed to Robert Metcalfe,
    originator of Ethernet and founder of 3COM the
    value of a network is proportional to the square
    of the number of nodes so, as a network grows,
    the value of being connected to it grows
    exponentially, while the cost per user remains
    the same or even reduces.

54
Technology Forecasts
  • Moore's Law formulated by Gordon Moore of Intel
    in the early 70's - the processing power of a
    microchip doubles every 18 months corollary,
    computers become faster and the price of a given
    level of computing power halves every 18 months.
  • Gilder's Law proposed by George Gilder, prolific
    author and prophet of the new technology age -
    the total bandwidth of communication systems
    triples every twelve months. New developments
    seem to confirm that bandwidth availability will
    continue to expand at a rate that supports
    Gilder's Law.
  • Metcalfe's Law attributed to Robert Metcalfe,
    originator of Ethernet and founder of 3COM the
    value of a network is proportional to the square
    of the number of nodes so, as a network grows,
    the value of being connected to it grows
    exponentially, while the cost per user remains
    the same or even reduces.

55
Technology Forecasts
  • Gilder's Law proposed by George Gilder, prolific
    author and prophet of the new technology age -
    the total bandwidth of communication systems
    triples every twelve months. New developments
    seem to confirm that bandwidth availability will
    continue to expand at a rate that supports
    Gilder's Law.

56
Technology Forecasts
  • Moore's Law formulated by Gordon Moore of Intel
    in the early 70's - the processing power of a
    microchip doubles every 18 months corollary,
    computers become faster and the price of a given
    level of computing power halves every 18 months.

57
Technology Forecasts
58
Technology forecasts
  • Narrowband
  • In 1990s
  • Fixed line
  • Mobiles
  • 2kbps to 56kbps
  • Why now broadband?
  • Why broadband all over
  • Many last mile broadband networks?
  • Similar technology used by all

59
Technology forecasts
  • Why are all last mile technologies going
    broadband together?
  • PSTN-xDSL, ADSL2 (100Mbps)
  • Cell phones. CDMA, HSDPA, evolved 3G, 4G !00mbps)
  • PLC going to 100MBPS
  • WiFi, WiMAX going to 100mbps
  • UWB for PAN. 500Mbps.

60
Technology forecasts
  • Why are all last mile technologies going
    broadband together?
  • Both wireline
  • Copper- powerline
  • Twisted copper PSTN
  • Wireless
  • Cellphone- GSM, SDGE, CDMA, HSDPA
  • wiFi, WiMAX

61
Technology forecasts
  • Why are all last mile technologies going
    broadband together?
  • Similar modulation and logorithms
  • Cdma, ofdm, cofdm, MIMO
  • LOS/NLOS/QOS
  • Encryption and decryption
  • Compression and Gig and Meg bandwidth.
  • Multiple waves, frequencies
  • High density chips- semiconductors
  • All require massive cheap processing power

62
Technology forecasts
  • Broadband requires more and more power for all
    last mile technologies.
  • Thus all depend upon progress in semiconductor
    technologies.
  • Must be global standards to reap rewards of cheap
    power.
  • Thus all last mile technologies are expected to
    deliver 100-200mbps to the end user within ten
    years.
  • Standardization and mass production is crucial.

63
Technology forecasts
  • Moores law will still give increasing returns
    for 10 years plus
  • Then system integration law will take over.
  • See graph from IEEE Spectrum.

64
Technology forecasts
  • More power at the same price
  • Crucial to the penetration of broadband
    communication is the supply at the same price
  • 30 million cellphones ( mainly narrowband-
    8-56kbps) in South Africa now
  • In ten years 40 million broadband (
    10mbps-100mbps)devices ( STB, Smart phones, etc)
    available.

65
Technology forecasts
  • Wireline
  • Twisted pair
  • Electricity grid
  • Coaxial
  • Ethernet
  • Wireless
  • Cellphones
  • DTV
  • Satellite

66
Technology forecasts
  • Display
  • Large and bright color displays have become
    strong selling point for mobile phones, and
    magnitude of features and services make good use
    of themGUIs, imaging, browsing and gaming. The
    display is one of the most expensive components
    in a phone, but because it is one of the most
    tangible and eye-catching of all features, this
    cost is justified. Display technology is evolving
    rapidly . The QVGA displays (ca 77,000- pixel
    resolution) introduced in phones in 2003 will
    become commonplace in 2005 and 2006. In Japan and
    Korea, for instance, QVGA displays are already
    standard. 1
  • 1 . Ericsson. Ericsson Review. Multi-media in
    mobile phones. 2004.

67
Technology forecasts
68
My confidence in such forecasts
  • Moores Law and my first PC
  • Read about Moores law in middle 1960s
  • I estimated that if the law was correct I should
    be able to buy my own computer by early eighties
  • I bought one in Seattle in 1981.
  • Digital camera
  • Regular queries at camera shops. Looking for a
    digital camera for less than R1000.
  • Moores law worked again.
  • Now very little film cameras and film processing
    left

69
Why Digital TV?
70
Why Digital TV?
71
Why Digital TV?
72
Digital TV
  • Why digital TV?
  • Greater spectrum efficiency
  • Massive expansion of the need for spectrum
  • Cellphones
  • WiFi and WiMAX
  • Satellites
  • Digital will give 3 to 5 times increase in
    capacity
  • Interactivity
  • Enhanced applications

73
Digital TV
  • Moving to digital TV
  • For much better use of scarce spectrum
  • Can sell digitized product to the emerging
    broadband Next Generation Internet.
  • As discussed the new fixed line networks and
    mobile networks become in effect extensions of
    the Internet
  • DVB-T, and DVB-S, and DVB-C, DVB-H
  • Digital video broadcasting via Terrestrial,
    Satellite, cable and handheld mobile
  • Alternative delivery networks. The new Internet,
    fixed and mobile or terrestrial and satellite
    broadcast or both.

74
Digital TV
  • Analog TV
  • NTSC
  • North America
  • PAL system
  • Europe
  • South Africa adopted PAL in 1975.
  • Digital TV
  • New standards emerging
  • DVB, DVB-T, DVB-H, MHP, ISDB-T, MediaFLO etc.

75
Digital TV
  • Alternatives
  • Digital broadcast to (DVB-T or DVB-H)
  • Handheld device
  • STB
  • Laptop
  • IPTV unicast or multicast to
  • Handheld device or STB or PC
  • Interaction getting the best from both

76
Digital TV
  • Streaming TV on mobiles
  • Live TV on handhelds
  • A number of standards
  • ATSC
  • ISDB-T
  • DMT
  • DVB-T, S, C and H
  • EU-ETSI

77
Digital Broadcasting-standards
  • ATSC-Advanced Television Systems committee
  • North America and South Korea
  • HDTV with fixed antenna
  • Not mobile
  • ISDB-Integrated Services Digital Broadcasting
  • Japan
  • Multimedia
  • Mobile
  • HDTV

78
Digital Broadcasting -standards
  • DVB-T Digital Video Broadcasting terrestrial
  • European
  • Rooftop
  • Portable
  • Used in public transport
  • Singapore
  • Germany
  • DVB-T used for HDTV
  • Australia

79
Live TV to Handheld
  • There is video streaming and IPTV over Internet
  • To broadband mobile phones
  • Live TV to handhelds- via broadcasting
  • DMB Korea
  • ISDB-T Japan
  • MediaFLO
  • DVB-H

80
Live TV to Handheld
  • DMB-Digital multimedia Broadcasting
  • To mobile handhelds
  • T-DMB. Launched 2004
  • S-DMB launched 2005
  • South Korea
  • ISDB-T
  • Japan
  • To handhelds
  • MediaFLO
  • Proproetary. Quallcomm
  • OFDM
  • USA

81
Live TV to Handheld
  • DVB-H
  • Mobile version of DVB-T
  • Audio and video to handheld
  • DVB-H is modified DVB-T to lower batterey power
    usage
  • Via time slicing
  • Can save 90 of battery
  • 3G phones are being made with DVB-H receivers.
  • Such 3G phones will have live TV via DVB-H
  • Also IPTV via streaming on brpadband Internet.

82
Digital TV The DVB Project
83
DVB
  • DVB project started in 1998
  • 2000 The EU sponsored Motivate project concluded
    that mobile reception of DVB-T is possible but
    required dedicated broadcast networks
  • Five years after inception DVB-T shows flexibiity
    to permit mobile broadcast services in Singapore
    and Germany.

84
DVB
  • DVB ( Digital video broadcasting) specifies the
    physical and link layer
  • DVB-T terrestrial broadcasting
  • DVB-C cable
  • DVB-S satellite
  • DVB-H live to handheld device

85
What is DVB-H
  • The DVB-H specification for broadcasting to
    battery-powered handheld devices, and a related
    set of specifications for IP datacast (DVB-IPDC),
    are the key enabling technologies for mobile
    television.

86
DVB-H Protocol Stack
87
IPDC ( Datacasting)
88
DVB-H sharing a DVB-T network
89
Fixed content delivery session
90
Dynamic file delivery session
91
Content/Service protection
92
DVB-H
  • DVB-H system outline
  • Deals with Physical and link layers
  • DVB-T transmission system has proven ability to
    serve fixed, portable and mobile terminals
    handheld terminals require specific features
  • Transmission system must be able to repeatedly
    turn the power on and off to reduce consumption
  • Easy to move from one transmission cell to
    another
  • Reception of DVB-H services in indoor, outdoor
    locations and at different soeeds
  • Mitigate noise
  • Work globally

93
DVB-H
  • DVB-H system outline
  • Deals with Physical and link layers
  • Physical layer
  • DVB-T specs plus
  • DVB-H signalling in TPS bits to enhance speed of
    delivery. Mandatory.
  • 4K-mode
  • In-depth symbol interleave for 2K and 4K modes.
  • Link layer
  • Time slicing to reduce power consumption
  • Forward error correction FEC and
    MPE-multi-protocol encapsulated data.

94
DVB-H Receiver
95
DVB-H System
96
DVB-H Time slicing
  • Time Slicing
  • The objective of time slicing is to reduce the
    average power consumption of the terminal
  • And to enable smooth and seamless handover
  • Time slicing consistes of sending data in bursts
    using higher bitrate
  • Time slicing enables a receiver to be on only a
    fraction of the time.
  • It therefore uses only a fraction of the power.

97
DVB
  • Streaming TV on mobiles
  • Live TV on handhelds
  • A number of standards
  • ATSC
  • ISDB-T
  • DMT
  • DVB-T, S, C and H
  • EU-ETSI

98
DVB
  • DVB-T Terrestrial broadcast
  • To fixed and portable CPE

99
DVB-H
  • The new DVB-H standard , while in no way
    changing the current digital TV business models
    for fixed reception, could provide new business
    opportunities for a variety of players from
    broadcasters to cellular operators to chip and
    equipment manufacturers. Faria, Hendriksson et
    al. IEEE Jan 2006.

100
DVB - H
  • Digital TV for handhelds
  • DVB-T started in 2002 as part of the DVB project.
  • We define the general features of DVB-H
  • Then a closer look at the central new elements
    time-slicing and multiprotocol encapsulation
    forward error correction.(MPE-FEC)

101
DVB - H
  • The DVB-H system and standards
  • Based on DVB-T for fixed and in car reception
  • The main changes are in the link layer
  • Here the changes are the use of time slicing
    which reduces the power consumption in the
    receiver by up to 95.
  • Allows smooth handover
  • Use of time slicing is mandatory in DVB-H
  • The physical layer 1 is based on DVB-T
  • DVB-H is totally backward compatible with DVB-T

102
DVB - H
  • The DVB-H payload is composed of IP-datagrams
  • DVB-H has restricted data rates
  • DVB-H has
  • Classical audio and video coding schemes used in
    digital broadcasting do not suit DVB-H well.
  • H264/AVC replaces MPEG-2 video.

103
DVB - H
  • DVB-H transmission
  • The DVB-H physical layer has been modified from
    the DVB-T
  • OFDM
  • QPSK, 16QAM, 64QAM can be used

104
DVB - H
  • DVB-H user equipment
  • DVB-H receiver and a
  • DVB-H terminal
  • DVB-H transmission of IP services

105
DVB - H
  • Handover considerations
  • DVB-H supports very efficient handover
    considerations.
  • The off periods in time slicing allows the
    receiver to scan for available alternate
    frequencies.

106
DVB - H
  • DVB-H networks
  • Typical application of DVB-H networks is an
    IPDatacasting service to a handheld
  • IPDC
  • Produces IP streams ( like video streams)
  • IP Streams are multicast intranet to IP
    encapsulators which will output the DVB_H TS.
  • TS is then distributors to the DVB-t or H
    transmitters. .

107
DVB - H
  • Broadcasting spectrum
  • The DVB-H is intended to use the same spectrum as
    DVB-T
  • Dedicated network
  • DVB-H can have its own dedicated network or
  • Shared network
  • DVB-H can share an existing DVB-T multiplex

108
DVB - H
  • Broadcasters
  • DVB-H provides a new set of services and revenues
    by servicing the mobile phone users.
  • More spectrum will become available when the
    analog TV switches off
  • DVB-H is very spectrum efficient compared with
    traditional TV

109
DVB - H
  • Spectral efficiency
  • One 8MHz channel can deliver 30-50 video
    streaming services to a small screen.
  • This is ten times more efficient than SDTV with
    MPEG-2 or 20 times more efficient than HDTV with
    AVC.

110
DVB - H
  • Sharing with DVB-T
  • DVCB-T transmitters services both DVB-T and DVB-H
    terminals
  • Key DVB-H component is the IP encapsulator

111
DVB-H Broadcast to handheld
  • Most governments preparing for digital
    broadcasting
  • More efficient use of spectrum
  • 3 to 5 times more spectrum efficient
  • Will create extra capacity
  • With growth of cellphones, WiFi WiMAX etc need
    more spectrum capacity
  • More flexible
  • HDTV
  • Interactive

112
DVB-H Implications for Broadcasters
  • More delivery platforms
  • More potential sources of revenue
  • Broadcasters
  • Content providers and aggregators
  • BBC to use all new digital delivery systems.

113
DVB-H Implications for Broadcasters
  • Contents
  • Sports clips
  • Weather
  • Music
  • cartoons

114
HDTV
  • First deployment of DVB HDTV was in Australia in
    2001.
  • First generation HDTV
  • MPEG-2
  • Second generation DVB HDTV
  • DVB-S2 transmission
  • H264/AVC compression
  • Key decision what bitrate for HDTV
  • Bitrate required to achieve video quality halves
    every five years

115
HDTV
  • What bitrate?
  • 1993 SDTV MPEG-1
  • Needed 8Mbps for quality
  • !995 MPEG-2
  • Needed 6Mbps for quality
  • 2000 MPEG-2
  • Needed 2MBPS for quality
  • HDTV 1080 need 6-8Mbps

116
HDTV
  • BBC to trial HDTV
  • Mid 2006
  • Trial will last for a year
  • BBC already doing HDTV production.
  • Aim is to convert by 2010.
  • Key developments that are driving HDTV are
  • DVB-S2
  • H264 compression

117
HDTV
  • High Definition TV
  • Digital TV has two resolution standards
  • Standard Definition. SDTV
  • High definition HDTV
  • First generation HDTV
  • MPEG-2
  • Deployed in USA, Australia and Japan in 2000.

118
HDTV
  • Next generation HDTV
  • MPEG-4
  • Windows media 9
  • H 264
  • Quantum leap with codecs and modulation schemes.

119
HDTV
  • High Definition TV
  • Standard Definition. SDTV
  • High definition HDTV
  • First generation HDTV
  • MPEG-2
  • Deployed in USA, Australia and Japan in 2000.

120
DTT-DVB-T
  • New Launch of DTT in EU
  • Fastest growing digital platform in EU
  • Growth rate 50 pa
  • EU in 2005 were 18 million DTT users
  • Why acceleration in adoption?
  • Driving forces
  • Declining STBprices
  • Enhanced offer

121
DVB-S2 standards
  • DVB-S is the satellite version for digital TV
  • DVB-S2 is the newest version.

122
DVB-S2 standards
  • Massive leap forward
  • Single chip decoder
  • 30-45 capacity increase over DVB-S
  • DVB-S2 so flexible can use with any satellite
    transponder
  • Spectrum efficiency range
  • .5 to 4.5 bphz
  • Return channel

123
DVB-S2 standards
  • Optimised per user
  • DVB-S2 with MPEG-4 will compete with ADSL and
    fiber
  • Broadband in rural areas.
  • Affordable broadband in rural areas
  • DVB-S2 with MPEG-4/AVC will support
  • 20-5 SDTV channels
  • 5-6 HDTV in 33MHz

124
DVB-S2 standards
  • Optimised for satellite applications
  • Broadcast
  • Interactive Internet
  • Digital TV
  • Data distribution
  • IP based services
  • DVB-S2 is a giant step forward from DVB-S

125
DVB-S2 standards
  • DVB-S2 is a giant step forward from DVB-S, itself
    a highly successful transmission standard for
    satellite broadcast and interactive services. The
    estimated 35-45 satellite capacity increase can
    significantly reduce the running cost of
    broadband satellite

126
Digital TV IPTV
127
IPTV
  • Numerous services and applications
  • Broadcast TV- like cable
  • Same programme to many simultaneously
  • National channels
  • Premium channels
  • Local channels
  • Music channels
  • HDTV- can be an option
  • Dedicated HDTV channels
  • Pay per view
  • Near video on demand (nVoD)
  • Same video on several channels

128
IPTV
  • Numerous services and applications
  • DVR or PVR (Personal Video Recorder)
  • Record and play when you want to
  • DVRs use hard disk
  • DVRs can be integrated into the IPTV system
  • VoD ( Video on Demand).Viewer can view content
    whenever he/she wants from a central library.

129
IPTV
  • Numerous services and applications
  • TV Telephony
  • Caller ID on TV
  • Phone number or callers name
  • Could be a picture of caller
  • Call routing
  • Forward call to email
  • Forward call to cellphone
  • Etc
  • Click to call from on screen list.

130
IPTV
  • Numerous services and applications
  • Video calling and conferencing
  • Face to face. Need a webcam
  • Conferencing extends this to many
  • Can call or conference with video-phone, laptop,
    TV set or desktop
  • Web and email on TV
  • Add a wireless keyboard alloows surfing the web
    with large screen.

131
IPTV
  • Numerous services and applications
  • Music on Demand
  • Large library of music.
  • For a low fee subscribers can enjoy unlimited
    access.
  • Gaming on demand
  • Presence
  • Instant messaging
  • Document sharing
  • Application sharing

132
IPTV
  • Deploying TV over IP
  • A TV over IP solution is implemented by a Telco
    or operator, which typically would stream between
    50 and 150 TV channels over an IP network.
    Content is streamed from the operator head-end
    over the backbone to a central/regional office.
    At the central office, the video is distributed
    over the last mile to the end user.
    Complimentary streaming equipment at the central
    office allows operators to insert additional
    channels of local content, which can be targeted
    at specific areas or groups of users. Later on in
    this paper, well outline in detail, three
    application architectures TV/IP over Fibre to
    the Home (FTTH), over DSL and over VDSL.
    Regardless of the network infrastructure,
    streaming and networking equipment needs to be
    installed at the head-end, the central/regional
    office and the end-user site.

133
IPTV
  • IPTV (Internet Protocol Television) describes a
    system where a digital television service is
    delivered to subscribing consumers using the
    Internet Protocol over a broadband connection.
    This service is often provided in conjunction
    with Video on Demand and may also include
    Internet services such as Web access and VOIP
    where it may be called Triple Play and is
    typically supplied by a broadband operator using
    the same infrastructure. Perhaps a simpler
    definition would be television content that,
    instead of being delivered through the
    traditional format, is received by the viewer
    through the technologies used for the World Wide
    Web.

134
IPTV
  • IPTV
  • is a service that will be likely first be
    offered by telephone companies and then added to
    other current television carriers later. Because
    it uses the Internet and sends less information
    than standard analog or digital television, IPTV
    promises lower costs for operators and lower
    prices for consumers. Using set-top boxes through
    broadband or Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)
    Internet, video can be streamed to households
    more efficiently than current coaxial cable. SBC
    Communications and Verizon have both upgraded or
    plan to upgrade their networks with fiber-optic
    technology to bring higher speeds across their
    networks. In addition to higher speeds, Digital
    Video Recorders (DVR), such as TiVo, will be able
    to record multiple programs at once and improve
    current program guides..

135
IPTV
  • IPTV
  • covers both live TV (multicasting) as well as
    stored video (Video on Demand VOD). The playback
    of IPTV requires either a personal computer or a
    "set-top box" connected to a TV. Video content is
    typically MPEG2TS delivered via IP Multicast, a
    method in which information can be sent to
    multiple computers at the same time, with the
    newly released H.264 format thought to replace
    the older MPEG-2. In standards-based IPTV
    systems, the primary underlying protocols used
    for IPTV are IGMP version 2 for channel change
    signaling for live TV and RTSP for Video on
    Demand.

136
IPTV
  • Advantages of IPTV
  • of IPTV include two-way capability lacked by
    traditional TV distribution technologies, as well
    as point-to-point distribution allowing each
    viewer to view individual broadcasts. This
    enables stream control (pause, wind/rewind etc.)
    and a free selection of programming much like its
    narrowband cousin, the web.
  • Tripleplay is an expression used by service
    operators describing a consumer package including
    telephony, data and video. Offering tripleplay on
    a broadband connection requires the use of IPTV
    and IP Telephony (Voice over IP, VoIP).

137
IPTV
  • TV over IP
  • The rollout of digital networking infrastructure
    is opening the door for Telcos and operators to
    offer converged services comprising broadband
    Internet access and IP based TV and
    entertainment. TV (or video) over IP is a broad
    streaming solution that includes several
    applications, all of which can be implemented on
    digital broadband networks such as ADSL, VDSL,
    fibre, LMDS and Wireless LANs. TV over IP is
    being utilized in the following applications
  • TV to the living room (instead of cable TV)
  • Time-shifted TV or Personal Video Recorder
    (PVR)
  • Interactive TV

138
IPTV
  • TV to the desktop
  • One of the inhibitors of broadband deployment in
    recent years has been the lack of broadband
    applications. This in turn resulted in low Return
    On Investment in broadband infrastructure. The
    viability of the broadband business model is
    becoming much more attractive with the
    introduction of TV over IP services which are a
    major revenue engine for Telcos and operators.
    With TV over IP, operators can offer a greater
    level of service to their customers. The fact
    that customers receive converged services on a
    single pipe and interface with a single provider
    for all communication needs results in easier
    technical maintenance, streamlined billing and
    hence improved customer service. Whats more, by
    utilizing digital networks, operators can offer
    far more sophisticated programming packages. It
    is possible to target specific channels at small
    groups of viewers, based on pre-defined viewing
    profiles.

139
IPTV
  • TV over IP using ADSL
  • ADSL can support last-mile bandwidths between 512
    Kbps and 6 Mbps. The actual bandwidth available
    depends on the distance between the end-point
    and the ADSL DSLAM. Depending on the last mile
    bandwidth available, users can receive 2 channels
    of video. In this case, two IP STBs will reside
    at the end point (one STB for each channel).

140
IPTV
  • TV over IP using VDSL
  • VDSL configuration rests on fibre connectivity
    over the backbone at bit rates of 155 Mbps and
    up. Transmission from the last mile network node
    to the end point is at bit rates of between 10
    and 40 Mbps. The high bandwidths supported by
    VDSL enable consumers to receive multiple
    channels for playback on multiple TV sets. With
    VDSL, the backbone infrastructure is based on
    fibre to the curb/basement while the last mile
    solution uses VDSL over the telephone copper line.

141
IPTV
  • TV over IP using FTTH (Fibre to the Home)
  • FTTH configuration rests on fibre connectivity
    from the head-end to the end-point. In this
    configuration video is transmitted over a fibre
    backbone at more than 155 Mbps. Last mile
    configuration consists of a 100BaseT network.
    Such wide bandwidths allow users to receive
    multiple channels, which are played back by
    IP/STBs.

142
IPTV
  • IPTV (Internet Protocol Television)
  • describes a system where a digital television
    service is delivered to subscribing consumers
    using the Internet Protocol over a broadband
    connection. This service is often provided in
    conjunction with Video on Demand and may also
    include Internet services such as Web access and
    VOIP where it may be called Triple Play and is
    typically supplied by a broadband operator using
    the same infrastructure. Perhaps a simpler
    definition would be television content that,
    instead of being delivered through the
    traditional format, is received by the viewer
    through the technologies used for the World Wide
    Web.

143
Mobile IPTV
  • Mobile TV
  • During 2004, many mobile operators launched
    mobile TV services, which allow users to watch TV
    on their mobile terminals. At present mobile TV
    is offered via streaming technology over
    point-to-point connections. However, large-scale
    market deployment of mass media services like
    mobile TV will require new mobile network
    capabilities commonly referred to as
    broadcast/multicast. 1
  • 1 . Ericsson. Ericsson Review. Mobile
    Broadcast/multi-cast in Mobile networks. 2005.

144
Mobile IPTV
  • TV to the Mobile
  • is increasingly being seen as one of the killer
    applications for mobile network operators.
    However the delivery of the world's number one
    mass entertainment medium to the mobile device
    poses numerous problems. Mobile networks- both
    existing such as GPRS and emerging such as UMTS,
    have been built for one to one services and as
    such are unable to scale to enable the delivery
    of content to a mass audience. For TV to the
    mobile to be a reality, operators must turn
    towards proven broadcast networks which have been
    specifically designed to deliver mass content.
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