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Curriculum and Instruction Defined

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Title: Curriculum and Instruction Defined


1
Education, Training, and Development Fundamentals
and Foundations for Court Leaders
National Association For Court Management
2
Court Leaders Must Actively Lead Judicial Branch
Education
Learning principles and practices
  • Understanding
  • learners

Organizational structure
  • Strategic use of Delivery Methods
  • Learners

Change management
  • Adequate Funding
  • Assessment/
  • Results

3
Learning Objectives
  • By the end of the program participants will
  • Understand how ETD supports the purposes and
    responsibilities of courts
  • Be able to align ETD activities to the courts
    strategic vision and mission
  • Be able to apply fundamentals of adult education
    to ETD activities

4
Learning Objectives
  • By the end of the program participants will
  • Know the strengths and weaknesses of various
    delivery mechanisms,
  • Be able to identify highly effective faculty,
  • Know of various judicial branch education
    resources, AND
  • Complete an individual action plan for improving
    personal performance in key skill areas.

5
Context and Vision
The greatest issue for court leaders is how to
prepare ourselvesand our courts for the
future.
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day OConnor
6
To contribute to the development of individuals,
courts, and the court management profession,
judicial branch education must
  • Span the career of individuals, and not be
    limited to orientation or training to perform
    specific tasks
  • Provide for significant interaction among program
    participants
  • Include experienced professionals as faculty, and
    in the planning and a valuation process to ensure
    really and perceived problems are addressed in
    every program
  • Address a wide variety of topics, both practical
    and theoretical.
  • NACM Core Competencies
  • Education, Training, And Development Curriculum
    Guidelines

7
The Difference Between Education and Training
If we apply knowledge to tasks we already know
how to do, we call it productivity. If we apply
knowledge to tasks that are new and different, we
call it innovation. Peter Drucker
8
Seven Characteristics of Effective Education,
Training and Development Programs
9
1st Characteristic of Effective Education
Programs
  • Commitment and Support of Leadership
  • The only people who can provide genuine
    leadership in judicial education are those who
    have a kind of dual visionvision that sees the
    intertwining nature of change in organizations
    and change in people.

10
2nd Characteristic of Effective Education
Programs
  • A Clear and Compelling Purpose
  • What is it we are really trying to achieve?
  • The goal of Judicial Branch Education is to
    maintain and improve the professional competency
    of all persons within the judiciary, thereby
    enhancing the performance of the judicial system
    as a whole.

11
3rd Characteristic of Effective Education
Programs
  • Helping Professionals Think in Qualitatively
    Richer Ways
  • Professor Paul Wangerin of Tulane Law School says
    that law schools do a good job of helping
    students think in analytical, objective ways,
    they do not foster development of the abilities
    required to see a case in its context and then
    take action consistent with the multilayered
    nature of so many legal situations.

12
4th Characteristic of Effective Education
Programs
  • Helping Professionals become more Competent
  • What is it we are really trying to achieve?

13
5th Characteristic of Effective Education
Programs
  • Active Learning
  • Students do not learn much just sitting in
    classes listening to teachers, memorizing
    prepackaged assignments, and spitting out
    answers. They must talk about what they are
    learning, write reflectively about it, relate it
    to past experiences, and apply it to their daily
    lives. They must make what they learn part of
    themselves.
  • - Arthur W. Chickering and Stephen C. Ehrmann

14
6th Characteristic of Effective Education
Programs
  • Adequate Resources
  • Faculty
  • Planning Committees
  • Funding

15
7th Characteristic of Effective Education
Programs
  • A Sound Integrated Curriculum
  • Curriculum is defined as all the experiences
    provided by the institution or agency which are
    designed to foster student learning.

16
Courts as Learning Organizations
Courts will change only when the people within
them change.
Charles Claxton Former Director, Leadership
Institute in Judicial Education
17
A learning organization is where
  • Every Individual in the organization is growing
    or enhancing their capacities to create and
    contribute.
  • People feel they are doing something that matters
    to them personally and to the world.
  • Learning is an ongoing and creative process for
    its members.
  • The organization continually becomes aware of its
    underlying knowledge base-particularly the store
    of tacit, unarticulated knowledge of employees

18
A learning organization is where
  • Employees at all levels, individually and
    collectively, continually increase their capacity
    to produce results they really care about.
  • Employees are invited to learn what is going on
    at every level of the organization, so they can
    understand how their actions influence others.
  • People treat each other as colleagues. Theres
    mutual respect and trust in the way they talk to
    each other, and work together, no matter what
    their positions may be.

19
A Learning Organization and Individual Learning
Organizations learn only through individuals who
learn. Individual learning does not guarantee
organizational learning. But without it no
organizational learning occurs.
Peter Senge The Fifth Discipline, The Art
Practice of The Learning Organization
20
Five Disciplines Of The Learning Organization
  • Personal Mastery
  • Commitment to lifelong learning
  • Mental Models
  • How we understand problems and interact with
    others
  • Shared Vision building
  • Identify future goals and directions

21
Five Disciplines Of The Learning Organization
  • Team Learning
  • Capitalize on strengths of all members
  • Systems Thinking
  • Relationships between function, people, company,
    environment

22
Personal Mastery
  • Discipline of personal growth and learning goes
    beyond competence and skills, though it is
    grounded in competence and skills. It means
    approaching ones life as a creative work, living
    from a creative as opposed to a reactive
    viewpoint.
  • Peter Senge,
  • The Fifth Discipline, The Art
  • Practice of The Learning
  • Organization

23
How do learning organization principles work in
practice?
  • Ford engineers -trying to lessen noise and
    vibration
  • First approach added weight to car, braking and
    tires had to be redesigned, increased cost of
    car They were just giving problems to someone
    else!
  • Second approach brought brake people, chassis
    and suspension people together, used alternative
    solution based on geometry and position of parts
    to solve noise problem (systems approach).

24
Exercise 1 Learning Organizations
  • In your small groups, answer the following
    questions
  • Is this the type of court organization that you
    would want to work for? Why?
  • How would being a learning organization benefit
    the courts?
  • How far are the courts in general (your court
    specifically) from becoming a learning
    organization?

25
Exercise 1 Learning Organizations
  • In your small groups, answer the following
    questions
  • What policies, events, or aspects of behavior can
    be taken to start the process of turning the
    courts into a learning organization?
  • What are the first steps that your court needs to
    perform to start down the path of becoming a
    learning organization?

26
Adult Education Theory
  • Experience is the adult learners living
    textbook.
  • Eduard C. Lindeman

27
Pedagogy and Andragogy Whats the Difference?
28
The Andragogical Model As a person matures
  • Self-concept Moving from being a dependent
    personality toward being self-directed.
  • Experience Accumulating a growing reservoir of
    experience that becomes an increasing resource
    for learning.
  • Readiness to learn. Orienting increasingly to the
    developmental tasks of our social roles.
  • Orientation to learning. Time perspective changes
    from postponed application of knowledge to
    immediacy of application and shifting from
    subject-centeredness to problem centeredness.
  • Motivation to learn Their motivation to learn is
    internal.
  • Malcolm Knowles

29
The Learner
Pedagogical
Andragogical
  • The learner is dependent upon the instructor for
    all learning
  • The teacher/instructor assumes full
    responsibility for what is taught and how it is
    learned.
  • The teacher/instructor evaluates learning
  • The learner is self-directed
  • The learner is responsible for his/her own
    learning
  • Self-evaluation is characteristic of this approach

30
Role of the Learners Experience
Pedagogical
Andragogical
  • The learner comes to the activity with little
    experience that could be tapped as a resource for
    learning
  • The experience of the instructor is most
    influential
  • Learner brings a greater volume and quality of
    experience
  • Adults are a rich resource for one another
  • Different experiences assure diversity in groups
    of adults
  • Experience becomes the source of self-identify

31
Readiness to Learn
Pedagogical
Andragogical
  • Students are told what they have to learn in
    order to advance to the next level of mastery
  • Any change is likely to trigger a readiness to
    learn
  • The need to know in order to perform more
    effectively in some aspect of ones life
  • Ability to assess gaps between where one is now
    and where one wants and needs to be

32
Orientation to Learn
Pedagogical
Andragogical
  • Learning is a process of acquiring prescribed
    subject matter
  • Content units are sequenced according to the
    logic of the subject matter
  • Learners want to perform a task, solve a problem,
    live in a more satisfying way
  • Learning must have relevance to real-life tasks
  • Learning is organized around life/work situations
    rather than subject matter units

33
Motivation for Learning
Pedagogical
Andragogical
  • Primarily motivated by external pressures,
    competition for grades, and the consequences of
    failure
  • Internal motivators
  • self-esteem, recognition, better quality of life,
    self-confidence, self-actualization

34
The Challenge for Adult Educators is to resolve
conflicting expectations of adult learners
  • They are conditioned to be passive learners and
    on the other hand.
  • They have an expectation and need to be
    self-directing.

35
What Is Adult Development? Erikson, Perry,
Piaget, Rogers, Dewey, Kegan, Mezirow, Schon,
Belinkey, Kolb and others.
  • Self Responsibility
  • Self Assessment
  • Self Direction
  • Self Questioning

36
Fostering Personal Development Through Teaching
  • The relationship between learning and development
    is complex, but in general we know
  • Learning can trigger development
  • Developmental processes stimulate engagement in
    learning
  • Transformational learning is most often linked
    with development. Transformational learning
    changes our belief structures and changes how we
    know.
  • Require reflection and meaning-making
  • Bring about new ways of thinking and doing

37
Fostering Personal Development Through Teaching
  • Informational learning, on the other hand,
    changes what we know (Mezirow, 2000).
  • Gain new knowledge and skill
  • Pre-requisites for transformational learning
    activities

38
Highly Developed Court Professionals
  • Can Think in Complex Ways
  • Possess a High Level of Competence
  • Accept Responsibility for Themselves and Willing
    to Deal with the Consequences of their Behavior
  • Believe that Understanding of their Experience is
    the Best Guide for their Actions
  • Are Consistently and Tenaciously Authentic
  • Committed to Goals which Transcend their Own
    Immediate Needs and Situations
  • Charles Claxton and Patricia Murrell

39
Current Trends Supporting Education for
Development
  • Mastery and Competency
  • Values, Ethics and Spirituality
  • Diversity Within the Workforce
  • Rapid Change, Information Explosion, Influx of
    Technology

40
Experiential Learning Model Assumptions
  • Assumption 1 People learn from immediate, here
    and now experience, as well as from concepts and
    books.
  • Assumption 2 People learn differently that
    is, according to their preferred learning styles.

41
Questions for Discussion
  • In what ways do these assumptions apply to adult
    learners in your organization today? In what
    ways do they seem outdated or inadequate?
  • In what ways are these assumptions helpful as we
    work with adult learners? In what ways might
    they mislead us?

42
Experiential Learning Theory
43
Reflection
  • Think for a moment about a particularly good
    learning experience youve had OR a particularly
    poor one.
  • Choose one and write it down.
  • Share this experience with the person next to you
    and the group.

44
Kolb Learning Style Inventory (LSI)
The LSI describes the ways you learn and how you
deal with ideas and day-to-day situations. It
can also serve as a stimulus for you to interpret
and reflect on the ways that you prefer to learn
in specific settings. The Assessment Based on
David A. Kolbs Learning Cycle Context Think
about situations in which you are presently
learning. How do You like to learn? Format
12 questions (15 minutes to complete and score)
45
Inventory Directions
  • Answer the questions on the Kolb Learning Style
    Inventory by ranking the 4 choices for the
    statements that describes you best and 1 for
    the statement that is least like you.
  • Plot your CE, RO, AC, and AE scores on the circle
    graph found on p.3 of your booklet. This graph
    will identify your preferred learning style.
  • Copy ranking on to second sheet, total your
    scores for CE, RO, AC, and AE. You should end up
    with a total of 120 points. Copy your scores into
    the squares at the top of p. 6.
  • Subtract AE-RO and AC-CE scores as directed on p.
    6 and plot on grid on back side of sheet.
  • This will identify your learning style type as
    discussed on pages 6-7of your workbook.

46
Kolb Learning Style Inventory (LSI)
What do the assessment results mean? The
results indicate the extent that you rely on each
of the four Learning modes based on Kolbs
Learning Cycle Concrete Experience Reflective
Observation Abstract Conceptualization Active
Experimentation
CE
Diverging
Accommodating
RO
AE
AC
Assimilating
Converging
47
The Wheel of Learning
48
The theory suggests that learning is not complete
until we have done two things

Processing (or transforming)
Prehending literally take hold of
49
Experiencing

CE Concrete Experience Learning from
experiences, relating to people, and feelings
Doing
AE Active Experimentation Showing ability to get
things done, Taking risks, Influencing through
action
RO Reflective Observation Viewing issues from
different perspectives and carefully observing
before making judgments
AC Abstract Conceptualization Analyzing ideas
and planning systematically, acting on an
Intellectual understanding
Reflecting
Thinking
50
Applying all 4 styles of learning helps you to
increase retention of learning and aids faculty
in choosing developmental assignments
thoughtfully Retention Rate Increase 20
AC 50 AC RO 70 AC RO CE 90 AC RO
CE AE
Accommodating
CE
Diverging
RO
AE
AC
Converging
Assimilating
AC - Abstract Conceptualization RO - Reflective
Observation CE - Concrete Experience AE -
Active Experimentation
51

Identifying Your Preferred Learning Style
CE Concrete Experience Experiencing
Accommodating
Diverging
100
60
AE Active Experimentation Doing
RO Reflective Observation Reflecting
20
Assimilating
Converging
AC Abstract Conceptualization Thinking
52
People with this learning style are best at
  • Converging
  • Practical application of ideas
  • Does well on conventional tasks
  • Hypothetical-deductive reasoning
  • Engineering and physical sciences
  • Accommodating
  • Puts ideas into action
  • Adapts well to changing circumstances
  • Intuitive trial and error
  • Likes technical or practical fields such as
    business

CE
Diverging
Accommodating
RO
AE
AC
Assimilating
Converging
53
People with this learning style are best at
(cont.)
  • Assimilating
  • Ability to create theoretical models
  • Assimilates disparate observations
  • Inductive reasoning
  • Likes abstract concepts- math and science
  • Diverging
  • Imaginative
  • Many perspectives
  • Broad cultural interests
  • Specializes in the arts and humanities
  • Information seeking

CE
Diverging
Accommodating
RO
AE
AC
Assimilating
Converging
54
In learning situations, people in this style
prefer to work
  • Converging
  • By experimenting with new ideas, simulations,
    laboratory assignments, and practical applications
  • Accommodating
  • With others
  • By setting goals
  • In the field
  • Testing out different approaches to completing a
    project

CE
Diverging
Accommodating
RO
AE
AC
Assimilating
Converging
55
In learning situations, people in this style
prefer to work (cont.)
  • Diverging
  • In groups to gather information
  • Listening with an open mind
  • Receiving personalized feedback
  • Assimilating
  • By reading and lectures
  • Exploring analytical models
  • Having time to think things through

CE
Diverging
Accommodating
RO
AE
AC
Assimilating
Converging
56
Small Group Discussion
  • Taking the style inventory, how consistent are
    your results with what you imagined your style to
    be?
  • How do you characterize the way in which you
    learn?
  • What kind of learning situations help you learn
    best?
  • What makes it difficult for you to learn?

CE
Diverging
Accommodating
RO
AE
AC
Assimilating
Converging
57
Benefits of Experiential Learning Model
  • Learning is effective.
  • Learning activities are individualized by style.
  • Lecture is made legitimate and can be more
    effective.
  • There is collaboration learning.
  • Learners contribute to the process.
  • Learners have the opportunity to make meaning of
    their experience through a dialogic process.

58
The Wheel of Learning Linking Kolb to a Learning
Organization
59
Continuing Professional Education is, in my
view, the single most important tool we have in
the judiciary to help us cope with the constant
change and challenges that are inherent in our
jobs.
Justice Christine Durham Chief Justice, Utah
Supreme Court
60
Homework Assignment
  • This evening, spend some time thinking about the
    future issues that will affect the court system
    due to such issues as demographics, global
    issues, the environment, transportation, energy,
    culture, values, science and technology, space,
    or religion. Identify three to five practical
    goals and new initiatives of your court system
    and/or trial court that judicial branch education
    should/could support.

61
Daily Review
  • What did I do yesterday?
  • (Concrete Experience)
  • What are my reflections about what I did?
  • (Reflective Observation)
  • What specific information did I learn?
  • (Abstract Conceptualization)
  • What do I plan to do with this learning?
  • (Active Experimentation)

62
Day Two Adult Education Fundamentals
63
Curriculum Defined
  • All the experiences provided by the institution
    or agency which are designed to foster student
    learning. (Claxton)
  • Overall plan for training, education, and
    developmental activities which supports the goals
    and mission f the organization. (Weaver)

64
Curriculum Development Seven Basic Questions
  1. What is the purpose of the curriculum?
  2. What are the objectives of the curriculum?
  3. How are the learning experiences to be selected
    and organized?
  4. What are the objectives of the course?
  5. What resources are to be employed, and how our
    time and space to be used?
  6. What is the design of the learning activities?
  7. How is the curriculum to be evaluated?

65
Curriculum Examples
  • NACM Core Competencies
  • National Judicial Institute

66
(No Transcript)
67
NJI Curriculum
  • Career New Judges Longer-serving Judges
    Mentoring Chiefs And Associates
    Multidisciplinary Education Retirement
    Planning
  • Content Family Law Criminal Law Civil Law Jury
    Trials Evidence Specialized Courses (E.G.
    Aboriginal Law Youth Criminal Justice Science
    And The Law).
  • Craft Judicial Dispute Resolution Dealing With
    Charter Issues The Trial Process Decision
    Making Language And Computer Skills Modules
    In Specialized Education (E.G. Credibility
    Assessment And Legal Reasoning.).
  • Context Domestic Violence Disability Issues
    Children As Witness Poverty Fetal Alcohol
    Syndrome The Self Represented Accused

68
ADDIE A Systems Approach to Instructional Design
  • A-Assess
  • D-Develop
  • D-Design
  • I Implement
  • E- Evaluate

69
ADDIE
Results
  • Learning
  • Performance
  • Impact

70
1. Assessing Needs What is the purpose of the
curriculum?
71
Needs Assessment
  • Educational and training needs assessment is a
    process of gathering and analyzing information,
    which identifies problems and opportunities that
    can be addressed to education and training.
    (Hudzik, 1991)
  • Determining Curricular Needs entails gathering
    information from three sources
  • Needs of the judicial system
  • The needs of learners
  • Subject matter experts

72
Conducting Needs Assessment
  • How widely do we need to cast the needs
    assessment net?
  • What problems issues, conditions or sets of these
    will be the focus of the needs assessment?
  • Which judicial system personnel and which aspects
    of their job performance seem to connect most
    directly to these issues?
  • Who and what can help define performance
    discrepancies and instructional needs?

73
Needs Assessment Data
  • Objective Data
  • Document Search
  • Formal Assessments/Surveys
  • Problem Diagnosis (Gap Analysis)
  • Job Analytic Formats
  • Judgmental/Opinion Data
  • Discussions With Other Judges/Court
    Professionals/Experts
  • Review Of New And Significant Law

74
Training Needs Analysis
  • Needs assessment (Is training necessary?)
  • Symptom employee has performance problems
  • Other problems that could require training
  • New Technology (Many Examples!)
  • New Legislation

75
Three Types Of Needs Analyses
  • Organizational analysis can court afford it?
    supported by judges? fits strategy of court?
  • Person analysis is problem due to lack of skill,
    knowledge, motivation? who needs training?
  • Task analysis what are skills, behaviours that
    need to be emphasized in training?

76
Organizational Analysis
  •  Questions to ask
  • Can we afford training?
  • May be better to focus on selection and placement
    rather than training
  • Do the training in house, use national provider,
    or hire consultant?
  • Do judges, managers and employees support
    training?
  • Does training fit our overall business strategy?

77
Person Analysis
  • How much is the performance problem costing the
    company?
  • Is existing training poor?
  • Could jobs be redesigned?

78
Gap Analysis
  • Where are they now?
  • Where do they need to be?
  • What is the gap

WHERE DO THEY NEED TO BE?
GAP
WHERE ARE THEY NOW?
9
79
Task Analysis
  • Job Analysis
  • Determine needed KSAAs

80
What is needed of employees?
  • They must be
  • Motivated
  • Understand benefits of training
  • Be aware of needs for training
  • Have the basic skill levels
  • Think they can do the training (self-efficacy)

81
Increase chance of training success by
  • Letting purpose of training be known
  • Demonstrate successful employees who have gone
    through training
  • Provide feedback

82
Exercise 3 Brainstorming Future Education
Needs
  • This brainstorming activity focuses on identify
    educational topics in the social context domain.
    In this simulated needs assessment YOU are
    serving as the expert advisory committee.

83
Step Two Design
  • Must Be Consistent With Principles Of Adult
    Learning and Most Effectively Promote and Enhance
    Learning.
  • Use a variety of teaching methods.
  • Plan for participation.
  • Kolbs Experiential Learning Model serves as a
    guide.

84
Formulation of Objectives What are the objectives
of the curriculum?
  • The objectives of the curriculum are usually
    written in fairly broad terms. Examples include
  • To help court managers stay abreast of recent
    cases dealing with personnel issues.
  • To assist judges in developing their skills in
    courtroom management and administration, new
    legislation, case law, and rules.

85
Formulation of Objectives What are the objectives
of the curriculum?
  • Course objectives reflect the needs identified in
    the needs assessment process.
  • They help the learners understand what the course
    is designed to address.
  • Serve As Targets for Instruction.
  • Guide the choice of instructional activities and
    materials.
  • Serve As a Road Map - make sure youve gotten
    where you want to go.

86
Writing Objectives
  • What do you expect the learners to be able to do,
    know, think, and feel by the end of your program?

87
Blooms Taxonomy
88
Selection and Organization of Content
  • Is there an order or structure to your content
    that is important?
  • Continuity
  • Sequence
  • Integration

89
Content Relevancy
  • Using the objectives as a vetting tool, assess
    each component of your planned training session
    and decide if that component actually will move
    you (and the participants) towards your stated
    objective. If not, dump it (even if that topic is
    a personal favorite of yours)!!
  • If using training materials designed by someone
    else, review them to ensure that they fit with
    your objectives, your participants, etc. Often a
    little customizing pays off in ensuring your
    participants have a positive learning experience.

90
Learning Activities Facilitating Direct or
Concrete Experience
  • Activities which involve the learner in the
    experience either physically or emotionally.
    Hands-on, uses the senses, engages the learner
    affectively. May have to be vicarious
    experience. Here and now data.
  • Recalling past experience
  • Group work, Role play
  • Demonstration
  • Case Studies
  • Films
  • Interviews
  • Self Evaluation

91
Learning Activities Facilitating Reflection on
Experience
  • Activities which require the learner to step back
    and look at experience, get perspective or make a
    connection to other experiences.
  • Structured small group discussion
  • Journals
  • Asking learners how they react to a situation
  • Asking learners to make connections to other
    learning
  • Asking learners to discuss situation with other
    people
  • Collecting data, Formulating questions

92
Learning Activities Facilitating Abstractions or
Principles
  • Information from authoritative sources. Using
    research and specialized knowledge for the law
    and other disciplines to develop principles.
  • Print (bench books, journal articles, other
    readings)
  • Authoritative guidelines ( checklists, rules,
    procedural steps)
  • Lectures
  • Films
  • Forms, flowcharts and documents
  • Skill oriented evaluation

93
Learning Activities Facilitating Application
  • Opportunities for the learner to try out
    principles or theories in problem-solving.
  • Role play
  • Individual and group projects
  • Video-taping or practice sessions
  • What if situations
  • Devising plans of action
  • Problem-solving activities

94
Step 3 Development
95
Resources and Parameters
  • Appropriate organizational structure to carry
    forward the curriculum
  • Adequate Resources (materials, AV support)
  • Other Parameters (time allotment, space, seating
    arrangements)

96
Physical Arrangements
  • How should the room be arrange (seating layout,
    lighting, name cards, etc) to facilitate the
    activities planned?
  • Class room
  • Theatre
  • Round table
  • Small tables
  • How many will be attending?

97
Physical Arrangements
  • What equipment, aids, supplies will I need? How
    will I get them there?
  • Does the Audio visual equipment work do I have
    contingency plan?
  • Refreshments?

98
Methodology
  • Lectures Large Groups, Information
    Dissemination, Short Time
  • Group Discussions Small Groups, Active
    Involvement Understanding Of Complex Issues,
    Longer Time Available
  • Case Studies - Small Groups, Active Involvement
    Understanding Of Complex Issues, Longer Time
    Available
  • In-basket Exercises Provides Practical
    Experience Performing Specific Tasks Doing
    Focused

99
Methodology
  • Films, Slide Shows - Large Groups, Information
    Dissemination, Short Time Frames Can Be Used To
    Trigger Discussions
  • Flowcharts, Decision Tree Diagrams Provide Step
    By Step Take Home Guides To Complex And/Or
    Mandated Processes
  • Real Time Exercises Variation On Case Studies
    But Using Participants Real Life Examples,
    Issues.

100
When selecting a teaching strategy ask
  • Will the strategy help participants achieve my
    course goal and learning objectives?
  • Will the strategy help participants relate course
    content to real life?
  • Is the strategy appropriate for the participants?
  • Are you willing to yield control of the course?

101
When selecting a teaching strategy ask
  • Do you have the skills or expertise to administer
    the strategy?
  • Is the strategy logistically possible?
  • Is the strategy worth the effort?
  • Does the cost (time, effort, materials) of the
    particular strategy justify the benefits to
    participants? Is it the most efficient strategy?

102
Choosing Materials
  • Are their materials that will increase a students
    desire to learn? If so what are they?
  • Are the learning materials appropriate for the
    level of the students?

103
Delivery Methods What is distance learning?
  • Definition
  • Distance learning is education where the
    instructor and students are geographically-dispers
    ed

104
Delivery Methods What is distance learning?
  • History
  • Correspondence classes
  • Instructional videotapes
  • Computer-based training (CBT) on CD-ROMs
  • Web-based training
  • Numerous technologies to support distance
    learning
  • Changing market with acquisitions, new products

105
Benefits of Distance Learning
  • Distance learning is becoming increasingly common
    due to potential
  • Cost savings
  • Time savings
  • Accessibility to experts
  • Accessibility for students

106
The art of teaching is the art of assisting
discovery. - Mark Van Doren, poet
Step 4 Teaching
  • Complete the phrase
  • A good teacher.........

107
Five Perspectives on Teaching
  • Transmission-Effective Delivery of Content
  • Apprenticeship-Modeling the Way of Being
  • Developmental-Cultivating Ways of Thinking
  • Nurturing-Facilitating Self-efficacy
  • Social Reform-Seeking a Better Society

108
Parker Palmer on Good Teaching
  • Good teaching cannot be reduced to technique
  • Good teachers possess a capacity for
    connectedness
  • Teaching is an exercise in vulnerability
  • Identity and integrity are at the core of good
    teaching
  • Use techniques that reveal rather than conceal
    personhood
  • Mentorship
  • What we teach will never take unless it
    connects with the inward, living core of our
    students lives
  • Finding the teacher within

109
Ken Bain What Makes Teachers Great?
  • Create A Natural Critical Learning Environment
    (student Interests, Learning To Reason From
    Evidence)
  • Guidance (focus On Questions, Helping Students To
    Understand Significance Of The Question)
  • Engage Students In Higher Order Intellectual
    Activity (compare, Apply, Evaluate, Analyze, And
    Synthesize)
  • Help Students Answer The Question Themselves
  • Get Students To Wonder What The Next Question Is

110
Step 5 Evaluation
  • Student learning
  • Immediate and ongoing assessment and evaluation
    are important throughout a program.
  • Course
  • Faculty
  • Overall Curriculum

111
Kirkpatrick Evaluation Model
Training Environment
  • Level 2
  • Learning
  • Learner
  • Level 1 Reactions
  • Learner

Learning Event
Work Environment
  • Level 4
  • Results
  • Performance
  • Financial
  • Level 3
  • Job Behavior
  • Learner
  • Organization

112
Methods for Long-Term Evaluation
  • Post-training surveys
  • Follow-up needs assessment
  • Check metrics (e.g., re-work, errors, etc.) to
    measure if participants achieved training
    objectives
  • Interview trainees and their managers, or their
    customer groups (e.g., constituents, other
    departmental staff)

113
Education is a process of growth and change.
  • If everything is the same after an educational
    experience, we have accomplished nothing.

114
Model for Curriculum Development
Results
  • Learning
  • Performance
  • Impact

115
Well Know Weve Made Progress When Educators and
Planning Committees focus on
  • A total curriculum, not just a program or
    session.
  • Program sequencing, not just topic overlap
  • Developmental needs of participants, not just hot
    topics.
  • Goals and objectives, not just content coverage.

116
Well Know Weve Made Progress When Educators and
Planning Committees focus on
  • Competency acquisition, not just information
    delivery.
  • Interactive teaching, not just lecturers.
  • Participant achievement, not just satisfaction.
  • Impact on system, not just participant
    satisfaction.

117
Well Know Weve Made Progress When Educators and
Planning Committees focus on
  • Needs of all participants, not just average
    participants.
  • Faculty facilitation skills, not just content
    knowledge or presentation skills.

118
Day Three Application and Educational Resources
119
Daily Review
  • What did I do yesterday?
  • (Concrete Experience)
  • What are my reflections about what I did?
  • (Reflective Observation)
  • What specific information did I learn?
  • (Abstract Conceptualization)
  • What do I plan to do with this learning?
  • (Active Experimentation)

120
Group Presentations
121
Judicial Branch Education Resources
  • JERITT
  • National Judicial Branch Education Providers
  • Monographs
  • State Justice Institute

122
Developing An Personal Action Plan
  • Please complete your personal action plan
  • You should list the actions you intend to carry
    out when you return to work
  • This can include
  • Your own personal actions (ways you would like to
    enhance your work through education, training and
    development)
  • Information on education, training and
    development that you would like to investigate
    further
  • Recommendations for your court/organization

123
Lifelong Learning
  • Why do some men and women discover new vitality
    and creativity to the end of their days, while
    others go to seed long before? Most of us, in
    fact, progressively narrow the scope and variety
    of our lives. We succeed in our field of
    specialization and then become trapped in it.
    Nothing surprises us. We lose our sense of
    wonder. But if you are conscious of these
    dangers, you can resort to countervailing
    measures. Reject stagnation. Reject the myth
    that learning is for young people. Its what you
    learn after you know it all that counts.
  • John Gardner
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