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The Redesign Alliance First Annual Conference

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Title: The Redesign Alliance First Annual Conference


1
WELCOME!
  • The Redesign AllianceFirst Annual Conference

2
THE REDESIGN ALLIANCE
  • Mission to advance the concept of course
    redesign throughout higher education to increase
    student success and access while containing or
    reducing instructional costs.
  • Create a community of higher education
    institutions and others who are committed to and
    experienced with large-scale course redesign.

3
THE REDESIGN ALLIANCE
  • Program in Course Redesign
  • Roadmap to Redesign (R2R)
  • State- and System-based Programs
  • Corporate Community
  • Colleagues Committed to Redesign (C2R)
  • Individual Institutions

4
  • Austin CC District
  • Bedford, Freeman, Worth
  • Blackboard
  • Boise State
  • Carnegie Mellon
  • CSU at Fresno
  • Connors State
  • Dallas CCC District
  • Eastern Washington U
  • Educational Testing Service
  • Fordham
  • Georgia State
  • Houghton Mifflin
  • Indiana University
  • Lorain County CC
  • Louisiana State
  • Ocean CC
  • Ohio Learning Network
  • Ohio State
  • RPI
  • Rio Salado College
  • Riverside CC
  • Seton Hall
  • SMARTHINKING
  • SunGard Higher Education
  • Tennessee Board of Regents
  • Thomson Learning
  • U of Alabama
  • U of Central Florida
  • U of Hawaii System
  • U of Idaho
  • U of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
  • UMass System
  • UNC at Chapel Hill
  • U of North Texas
  • U of Southern Mississippi
  • U of Texas System
  • University System of MD

5
REDESIGN ALLIANCENEW MEMBERS
  • Alamo Community Colleges
  • University System of Georgia
  • CSU, East Bay
  • DePaul University
  • East Tennessee State
  • Hawkes Learning Systems
  • Hocking College
  • Houston CC
  • Idaho State University
  • Indiana State University
  • Miami University
  • Minnesota State Colleges and Universities
  • Minnesota State U, Mankato
  • Northern Virginia CC
  • Purchase College, SUNY
  • Radford University
  • Saint Cloud State U
  • Santa Fe CC
  • Southwest Minnesota State U
  • SUNY at Oswego
  • Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
  • University of Calgary
  • University of North Carolina
  • University of South Carolina
  • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Winona State University

6
THE NEED TO IMPROVE LEARNING WHILE REDUCING COSTS
IS GREATER THAN EVER
  • "Over the years, we've invested tens of billions
    of dollars in taxpayer money and just hoped for
    the bestwe deserve better. To remain competitive
    in the 21st century global economy, we must act
    now, continue the national dialogue, and work
    together to find the right solutions."

Commission on the Future of Higher Education
7
WHATS BEHIND THAT STATEMENT?
  • U.S. college attainment rate 12th among major
    industrialized countries
  • Total per-student expenditures for higher
    education twice that of other major
    industrialized countries
  • Percentage of college graduates deemed proficient
    in prose literacy (able to read and extrapolate
    from a complex text) declined from 40 to 31 in
    the past decade.

8
  • Barely 6 out of 10 degree-seeking freshmen
    graduate within 6 years
  • Graduation rates are especially low for minority
    and low-income students
  • Many institutions lose 1 out of 4 students in the
    first year some lose even more.

9
FRESHMEN NOT RETURNING FOR SOPHOMORE YEAR
10
LARGE-ENROLLMENT INTRODUCTORY COURSES
  • Successful course completion is critical for
    first-year students.
  • Typical drop-failure-withdrawal rates contribute
    heavily to overall institutional drop-out rates
    between the first and second year.
  • Research Us 15
  • Comprehensives 22 to 45
  • Community colleges 40 to 50 or higher

11
Drop-Failure-Withdrawal RatesMathematics
  • Georgia State U 45
  • Louisiana State U 36
  • Rio CC 41
  • U of Alabama 60
  • U of Missouri-SL 50
  • UNC-Greensboro 77
  • UNC-Chapel Hill 19
  • Wayne State U 61

12
Drop-Failure-Withdrawal RatesOther Disciplines
  • Calhoun CC Statistics 35
  • Chattanooga State Psychology 37
  • Drexel U Computing 51
  • IUPUI Sociology 39
  • SW MN State U Biology 37
  • Tallahassee CC English Comp 46
  • U of Iowa Chemistry 25
  • U of New Mexico Psychology 39
  • U of S Maine Psychology 28
  • UNC-Greensboro Statistics 70

13
THATS THE GOOD NEWS! What do the grades
represent?
  • Curving
  • Lack of consistency
  • Lack of coverage
  • Inflation
  • Less time on task easier course
  • Amnesia

14
WHAT ABOUT COLLEGE COSTS?
  • Too many students are either discouraged from
    attending college by rising costs or take on
    worrisome debt burdens in order to do so.
  • From 1995 to 2005, average tuition and fees at
    public four-year colleges and universities rose
    51 after adjusting for inflation. For private
    institutions, the increase was 36.
  • State funding growth for higher education has
    fallen to its lowest level in over two decades.
  • Median debt levels among four-year college
    graduates were 15,500 (publics) and 19,400
    (privates.)

15
SPELLINGS COMMISSION
  • "U.S. higher education needs to improve in
    dramatic ways," changing from "a system primarily
    based on reputation to one based on performance."
  • Policymakers and higher education leaders should
    develop, at the institutional level, new and
    innovative means to control costs, improve
    productivity, and increase the supply of higher
    education.

16
SPELLINGS COMMISSION
  • We recommend that Americas colleges and
    universities embrace a culture of continuous
    innovation and quality improvement by developing
    new pedagogies, curricula, and technologies to
    improve learning, particularly in the area of
    science and mathematical literacy.
  • Effective use of information technology can
    improve student learning, reduce instructional
    costs, and meet critical workforce needs.
  • We urge states and institutions to establish
    course redesign programs using technology-based,
    learner-centered principles drawing upon the
    innovative work already being done by
    organizations such as the National Center for
    Academic Transformation.

17
WHAT DOES NCAT MEAN BY COURSE REDESIGN?
  • Course redesign is the process of redesigning
    whole courses (rather than individual classes or
    sections) to achieve better learning outcomes at
    a lower cost by taking advantage of the
    capabilities of information technology.

18
IT IS POSSIBLE TO INCREASE LEARNING WHILE
REDUCING COST
  • 25 of 30 PCR projects improved learning the
    other 5 showed equal learning.
  • 24 measured course completion rates 18 showed
    improvement.
  • All 30 reduced costs by 37 on average, with a
    range of 15 to 77.

Program in Course Redesign
19
IT IS POSSIBLE TO INCREASE LEARNING WHILE
REDUCING COST
  • 9 of 12 R2R projects improved learning the other
    3 showed equal learning.
  • 10 of 12 improved course completion rates the
    other 2 showed equal completion.
  • All 12 reduced costs by 32 on average, with a
    range of 13 to 68.

Roadmap to Redesign
20
ASSUMPTIONS THAT GET IN THE WAY
  • Improving quality means increasing cost
  • Adding IT increases cost
  • Using IT may even threaten quality

21
TRADITIONAL INSTRUCTION
Seminars
Lectures
22
BOLT-ON INSTRUCTION
23
WHAT DOES NCAT MEAN BY COURSE REDESIGN?
  • Course redesign is not just about putting
    courses online. It is about rethinking the way we
    deliver instruction in light of the possibilities
    that new technology offers.

24
COURSE REDESIGN WILL WORK FOR ALL KINDS OF
  • Disciplines
  • Institutions
  • Students
  • Faculty

25
ALL KINDS OF DISCIPLINES
  • Humanities
  • Communications, English Composition, Fine Arts,
    History, Music, Spanish, World Literature
  • Quantitative
  • Computing, Mathematics, Statistics
  • Science and Technology
  • Anatomy and Physiology, Astronomy, Biology,
    Chemistry, Engineering, Ethno-botany
  • Social Science
  • American Government, Economics, Education,
    Psychology, Sociology, Urban Affairs

26
ALL KINDS OF INSTITUTIONS
  • Doctoral/ResearchExtensive
  • Carnegie Mellon, Georgia State, Louisiana State,
    Ohio State, University of Alabama, University of
    Idaho, UMass-Amherst, University of Mississippi,
    University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech
  • Doctoral/ResearchIntensive
  • Northern Arizona University, Portland State
    University
  • Master's Colleges and Universities I
  • Eastern Washington University, Fairfield
    University, Florida Gulf Coast University,
    University of Southern Maine
  • Associate's Colleges
  • Central Ohio Technical College, Lorain County
    Community College, Rio Salado College, Riverside
    Community College, Tallahassee Community College

27
ALL KINDS OF STUDENTS
  • Traditional 1822 year olds
  • Students of color
  • Lowincome students
  • Working adult students

28
ALL KINDS OF FACULTY
  • Senior faculty (tenured)
  • Junior faculty (on the tenure track)
  • Instructors
  • Part-time, adjunct faculty

29
WHY NOT JUST FOCUS ON LEARNING?
  • The factors that lead to increased student
    learning and increased student retention are the
    same as those that lead to reduced instructional
    costs!

30
QUALITY AND COST ARE INTER-RELATED
  • Redesign the whole course
  • Quality Eliminate course drift greater
    course coherence and quality control
  • Cost Eliminate duplicate effort create
    opportunities for alternate staffing
  • Encourage active learning
  • Quality Learning is not a spectator sport.
  • Cost Reduce faculty preparation and
    presentation time reduce grading time
  • (e.g., interactive software, peer learning teams)

31
WHAT REALLY MATTERS?
  • Data
  • First, measure something . . .
  • A team approach
  • It takes a village . . .
  • Corporate partners
  • Mutual self-interest
  • Leadership
  • Faculty, department chairs, deans, campus
    executives, system and state leaders

32
YOU DONT NEED TO RE-INVENT THE WHEEL
  • Models for Course Redesign
  • Principles of Successful Course Redesign
  • Models for Assessing Student Learning
  • Cost Reduction Strategies
  • Critical Implementation Issues

33
THE NCAT WEB SITEwww.theNCAT.org
  • Course redesign planning resources
  • Project descriptions
  • Monographs Lessons Learned
  • Project contacts

34
WHAT WEVE LEARNEDWHAT WEVE ACHIEVED
  • The need is greater than ever
  • Its possible
  • Redesign works for all kinds
  • Cost and quality are inter-related
  • We know what really matters
  • You dont need to re-invent the wheel

35
WHERE WE NEED TO GO
  • Pedagogy
  • Resources
  • Assessment
  • Underserved Students
  • Learning Materials
  • Technologies
  • Learning Space
  • Change

36
PEDAGOGY
  • Promote proven pedagogical techniques that result
    in the most effective learning for higher
    education's students
  • Increase success rates
  • Respond to diverse learning styles and needs
  • Increase course completion rates
  • Improve overall institutional retention

37
RESOURCE ISSUES
  • Continue to illustrate the most effective ways to
    reduce the cost of instruction, thereby enabling
    institutions to
  • Deal with budget constraints
  • Serve more students
  • Decrease time to graduation by
    eliminating academic bottlenecks
  • Free resources to be used for
    institutional purposes

38
ASSESSMENT
  • Emphasize the importance of assessing student
    learning outcomes
  • Disseminate the use of simple assessment
    techniques that can be embedded in everyday
    academic practice
  • Generate interest among faculty and
    administrators in assessment in general
  • Use assessment to achieve other goals
  • Encourage multi-institutional and nationally
    normed assessments

39
UNDERSERVED STUDENTS
  • Pay particular attention to the impact of course
    redesign on underserved students in order to
    increase their access and success
  • Students of color
  • Low-income students
  • First-generation college students
  • Working adults

40
LEARNING MATERIALS
  • Stimulate the development of high-quality,
    affordable software and learning tools that meet
    challenging content standards through
  • Partnerships between institutions and
    content/technology producers
  • Inter-institutional collaboration

41
TECHNOLOGIES
  • Identify those technology applications that have
    the most promise for increasing student learning
    while containing instructional costs
  • Help institutions understand the instructional
    contexts that make those applications effective

42
LEARNING SPACE DESIGN
  • Explore the implications of course redesign for
    campus facilities
  • Help institutions connect space planning and
    effective learning

43
CHANGE
  • Advance strategies that will lead to substantial
    changes in instructional practices by helping
    institutions learn from the successes of those
    who have done it

44
NCAT REDESIGN SCHOLARS
  • Phoebe Rouse, LSU
  • Rob Sanders, Portland State University
  • Sally Search, Tallahassee Community College
  • Candace Thille, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Kirk Trigsted, U of Idaho
  • Margaret Trim, Central Ohio Technical College
  • Amiee Wagner, Central Ohio Technical College
  • Bill Williams, Eastern Washington University
  • Jim Wohlpart, Florida Gulf Coast University
  • Joe Benson, U of Alabama
  • John Broida, U of S Maine
  • Elizabeth Connor, UMass- Amherst
  • Tristan Denley, Ole Miss
  • Ron Henry, Georgia State
  • Malcolm Hill, U of Richmond
  • Gordon Hodge, U of New Mexico
  • Michelle Miller, Northern Arizona University
  • Mary Jane Pasky, Lorain County CC
  • Dennis Pearl, Ohio State

45
THE REDESIGN ALLIANCEAdvisory Board
  • Jon Alexiou, Educational Testing Service
  • Irv Goldstein, University System of Maryland
  • Bill Graves, SunGard Higher Education
  • Ben Hambelton, Boise State University
  • John Harwood, Penn State University
  • Robbie Melton, Tennessee Board of Regents
  • Karen Mills, Rio Salado College
  • Anne Moore, Virginia Tech
  • Linda Morris, University of Idaho
  • Pam Quinn, Dallas County Community College
    District
  • Randy Smith, Ohio State University
  • Phil Turner, University of North Texas
  • Karen Wells, Lorain County Community College

46
CAROL to CAROL at LSU in Spring 2005
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