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Title: Introduction to Atkins


1
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2
Introduction to Atkins
  • Brownfield Regeneration is one area of work for
    Atkins. We do lots, lots more!
  • Atkins at a Glance (including FG)
  • Established 1938 as WS Atkins
  • 17,278 employees
  • Turnover 1.3 billion
  • Offices in most major towns and cities in UK
  • More than 200 permanent offices worldwide
  • UKs largest engineering consultancy
  • Europes largest multidisciplinary consultancy
  • Eighth largest global design firm

3
Introduction to Today
  • In 2006 we ran a similar event with our
    colleagues from FG, LSH and EP
  • This allows us to impart some of our knowledge to
    you in a relaxed environment
  • It also provide an opportunity for new business
    relationships to develop and existing ones to be
    strengthened
  • There is a lot we can do to assist with
    Brownfield Regeneration projects as the following
    talks will demonstrate

4
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5
Securing the Future Supply ofBrownfield Land
Government Response Prof. Peter Roberts Chair
Academy for Sustainable Communities
6
Brownfield Land Policy - Context
  • Old policy was frequently responsive i.e.
    Derelict Land Reclamation Grant used for many
    years
  • Brownfield Land Policy now much more proactive
    identify land, identify potential, assess
    possibility, establish programmes, implement,
    monitor and review
  • Brownfield Land Policy given boost by report of
    Urban Task Force and Sustainable Communities Plan
  • Since 1998 availability of better and more
    comprehensive information NLUD PDL information
  • And lots of research and guidance i.e.
    Brownfield Barriers

7
National Brownfield Strategy Background
  • In 2003, Government asked English Partnerships to
    work with Government departments and stakeholders
    to produce a National Brownfield Strategy (NBS)
    published June 2007
  • Objectives of NBS
  • Tackle existing problems of dereliction,
    particularly in towns and cities
  • Help ensure a continuing supply of land,
    returning PDL to beneficial use
  • Encourage and support best practice in the reuse
    of PDL, consistent with the principles of
    sustainable development

8
National Brownfield Strategy - Recommendations
  • Strand 1 Identifying, assessing and preparing
    brownfield for reuse
  • Local Brownfield Strategies Physical /
    Regulatory / Market problems Prepare sites
  • Strand 2 Safeguarding the environment
  • Safeguard environment Use of brownfield for
    non-development use
  • Strand 3 Enhancing communities
  • Improve communities by tackling blight Secure
    amenity land
  • Strand 4 Accreditation and skills
  • Skills and training Ensure joined-up approach

9
National Brownfield Strategy Government Response
  • Strand 1 Identifying, assessing and preparing
    brownfield for reuse
  • Links to PPS and other actions Extend support
    Technical and other help
  • Strand 2 Safeguarding the environment
  • Protocol on safeguarding Recognise alternative
    uses
  • Strand 3 Enhancing communities
  • Innovative approach with CLAIRE Various amenity
    actions
  • Strand 4 Accreditation and skills
  • Publication of Brownfield Skills Strategy
    National Brownfield Forum

10
National Brownfield Strategy - Skills
  • Brownfield Skills Strategy published alongside
    Government response
  • Joint initiatives of ASC and EP
  • Recommendations
  • Skills Innovation Fund Skills Development
    Framework
  • Link to World Class Skills
  • Securing the workforce of the future
  • Retaining and developing the workforce
  • Responses received and undergoing assessment

11
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13
  • Transport Placemaking Transport and Movement
  • Jon Sandford, Associate Director, Atkins

14
Content
  • The importance of transport
  • Transport barriers / challenges
  • Transport enablers

15
Transport Barriers / Challenges
  • Need for strategy / masterplan
  • Network context / site constraints
  • Demand vs capacity
  • Junctions
  • Links
  • Public transport
  • Walking / cycling
  • Procedural
  • Need for a Transport Assessment / Statement /
    Plan
  • Policy context / congruency
  • People Having the right team

16
How Atkins Can Help Keys to Success in Transport
for Regeneration
  • Transport Assessments
  • Transport planning support to masterplanning and
    site design
  • Transport Modelling
  • Strategy Development
  • Movement and public realm dynamics
  • Right People
  • Quality of Place
  • Understand the process
  • Effective negotiation and dialogue
  • Strength in depth and location
  • Flexibility of service
  • Client outcome focused
  • COLLABORATION

17
Transport Placemaking Overcoming the Challenges
  • Start from the quality of the place that is
    being sought
  • Respond to urban design issues
  • people are the common currency
  • A balanced / sustainable and multi-modal
    transport provision
  • Include the application of traditional
    transport analysis

18
The Urban Planning Process
Visioning / Futures
Spatial Strategy
Development Framework
Master-planning
Development Briefs
Multiple Building Clusters
Building Landscape Design Planning Applications
19
Manual for Streets
  • Place is the key for (residential / street)
    transport planning
  • Create speed environment for innovation
  • Relaxation of design standards encouraged
    risk and liability considered
  • Structured process for street design

20
Transport Masterplanning
  • Define the structure for transport infrastructure
    and services
  • Understand phasing / evolution of transport
    investment
  • Understand how customers / site users can
    access the site / area
  • Establish development potential in transport
    terms

21
Transport Masterplanning Skills
  • Urban design understanding and communication of
    transport ideas
  • Placing transport interventions in urban design
    terms
  • Schematic layouts / diagrams
  • Layering by mode then integration of modes
  • .. Converging towards detailed concept and
    design
  • Communication and negotiation

22
The Value of Public Transport InterventionsRegene
ration Site, Swinton
  • Brownfield housing site
  • Pragmatic approach being progessed
  • Package of measures to unlock regeneration
  • Constrained site access
  • Emergency access route
  • Pedestrian bridge link to railway station

23
Site Proposal
24
Emergency Access Route
25
The Development Site andRailway Station
Connection
Station
Possible bridge extension and walk route link to
site
Development site
26
Site Location Bridge Aerial Photo
Site of Possible Bridge Extension Across Passing
Line
27
Existing Railway Overbridge
Passing Line to be traversed
Bridge extension here
28
Victorias, Southend - Study Area
29
Schematic Junction Remodelling Concepts
Revise traffic management to / from link
Create space
Create space
Create space and linkage
Create space
30
Schematic Junction Remodelling Concepts II
Revise traffic management to / from link
Create space
Create space
Create space
Create space and linkage
31
Option 1 - Two Way SERT and Bus By-Pass
RouteReverse Deepings Traffic Access
New Traffic Signals
Bus Stands Either Side Create Interchange Beneath
Over Bridge
Two Way Bus / Sert By Pass Route
Create space and movement across
Relocated bus stands
New Traffic Signals Allow Separate Stage for
Buses and SERT
Deepings Traffic Merges in from the South
New Traffic Signals
32
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33
Provisional Highways Scheme
34
Planning ApplicationProcess Requirements
  • Transport Assessment
  • Transport Statement
  • Travel Plan

35
Transport Assessment Guidance
  • Relates to appraisal of development site impacts
    .
  • HT Guidelines 1994
  • Now Department for Transport Guidance on
    Transport Assessment 2007 England
  • DTLR Circular 02/2007 Planning the Strategic
    Road Network
  • Note provincial variations

36
Underlying Principles
  • Encourage sustainability
  • Manage the existing network
  • Collaboration - negotiation interpretation
    qualitative factors!!
  • Each application considered on its own merits by
    the LPA

37
Transport Engineering Assessment
  • Strategic Modelling
  • Tactical Modelling
  • Junction Modelling
  • Traffic Micro-simulation Accession Analysis
  • Spreadsheet Modelling
  • AutoTrack Analysis
  • Economic and business case assessment
  • NATA wider / overall appraisal

38
Assessment Tools
  • Micro Simulation Network Modelling

Also Vissum Software
Analysis Using Paramics
Extent of Highway Network
39
Assessment Tools
  • AutoTrack Analysis Junction Design

40
Sustainable Transport Solutions
  • Travel Plan Framework / Toolkit
  • Travel Plan (with end user)
  • Monitoring and enforcement
  • Delivering S106 solutions
  • Corporate objectives zero carbon strategies
  • Increasingly enabling development monitoring
    linked to phasingand S106 Agreements

41
Pedestrian Planning
  • Inform and validate masterplan development
  • Inform future land values and rental levels
  • Innovation - New and emerging techniques in
    pedestrian modelling and real time transport 3D
    visualisation
  • Surveying and movement analysis
  • Network wide modelling and accessibility
  • Micro area / person modelling

42
Parliament Square Types of staticactivity
(Saturday)
Saturday 1000 to 1800
43
Parliament SquareDensity of static activity
(Saturday)
Saturday 1000 to 1800
44
Route Choice Analysis
45
Network Accessibility Modelling
  • Example Spinningfields
  • Mixed use development comprising 4.5m sqft
  • Outcomes
  • Support wayfinding within wider city
  • Assessment of the key office movement axis
  • Detail evaluation of potential optimisation for
    flows and space use of Hardman Square

Source Allied London and Foster and Partners
46
Pedestrian spaces Deansgate as a key link between
Spinngfield
47
Visibility Analysis
48
Visibility Analysis
49
Visibility Analysis
50
Visibility Analysis
51
Visibility Analysis
52
Visibility Analysis
53
Visibility Analysis
54
Visibility Analysis
55
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56
Urban Development Forecasting Flows
  • Example Leeds Eastgate
  • Design evaluation
  • Pedestrian modelling
  • Strategy
  • Outcome
  • Identified enhancements
  • Design developed using tool

The Eastgate masterplan
57
Observed Pedestrian Flows
58
Modelled Flows for the Existing City Centre
59
Pedestrian micro-simulation
60
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61
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62
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63
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64
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65
Movie Clips
66
Movement Space Rationalisation
67
Euston Station
Eversholt Street
Key desire lines
Pinch points
Actual routes
Cardington Street
Euston Road
68
Visibility Analysis of Existing Euston Estate
(Including Station Internal Space)
69
Visibility Analysis of Vision Masterplan
70
Euston Vision Masterplan
71
How Atkins Can Help Keys to Success in Transport
for Regeneration
  • Transport Assessments
  • Transport planning support to masterplanning and
    site design
  • Transport Modelling
  • Strategy Development
  • Movement and public realm dynamics
  • Right People
  • Quality of Place
  • Understand the process
  • Effective negotiation and dialogue
  • Strength in depth and location
  • Flexibility of service
  • Client outcome focused
  • COLLABORATION

72
Transport is Key
73
Transport Can Lead the Wayfor Regeneration
74
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75
Regeneration Constraints Case Studies Stephen
Cox, Atkins
76
Case Studies
  • Two recent examples of Atkins multidisciplinary
    specialists working to progress community
    aspirations for the redevelopment of brownfield
    land
  • Threshfield Quarry in North Yorkshire
  • Markham Colliery in South Wales

77
Threshfield Quarry
  • Working with a set of community aspirations, our
    approach was two-fold
  • Barriers Constraints Report
  • Initial Strategy Development (not covered in this
    presentation)
  • Threshfield Quarry extends to 52ha and is
    situated within Yorkshire Dales National Park
  • Potential for a mix of uses including
  • Cultural, heritage and education uses
  • Business space
  • Sporting and recreational uses
  • Outdoor ampitheatre and associated rehearsal and
    administrative space

78
A Multi-disciplinary Approach
Noise Vibration Acoustics assessment for
amphitheatre Ecology Ecological survey of
site Ground Conditions (Desk-based) Geotechnical
appraisal Contamination review Transport Infrastr
ucture assessment capacity Built
Structures Review of existing analysis
79
Conclusions
  • No insurmountable barriers
  • Community aspirations proven
  • Business case to be made as part of next stage

80
Former Markham Colliery
  • Worked with set of community aspirations
    developed through previous consultancy work
  • Barriers Constraints
  • Options assessment
  • Business plan for favoured option
  • Markham Colliery operated from 1911 to 1985
  • Potential for a mix of uses including
  • Visitor Centre for proposed Valleys Regional Park
  • Rural Skills Training Centre
  • Office base for Park ranger service
  • Low cost visitor accommodation (bunkhouse and
    campsite)
  • Café
  • Cycle hire

81
A Multi-disciplinary Approach
Economics Regeneration Socio-economic, tourism
and education assessments. Business Plan Town
Planning Policy alignment, BREEAM,
Sustainability Ecology Ecological survey of
site Ground Conditions (Desk-based) Geotechnical
and Contamination review Property
Market Specialist input from LSH Architecture
and Design Outline building design and site
layout
82
Conclusions
  • Economic viability is marginal
  • Commercial element introduced by study team to
    help cross-subsidise
  • Proposals dependent on public sector grant
    support and robust funding applications required.

83
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85
Quantifying Remediation Costs Potential
Uncertainty
Gary Hirst 23rd September 2008
86
Introduction
  • Is large scale remediation financially too risky?
  • Regulatory consistency?
  • Lack of practical understanding in development
    industry?
  • Remediation industry capability?
  • New emerging technologies?
  • What guidance is out there to assist?
  • Exclude the Part IIA process

87
Why Develop on Brownfield Land?
  • Preserve greenbelt
  • Redirect contaminated soils from landfill
  • Stimulate the use of sustainable remediation
    technologies
  • Clean up blighted land which pose risks to
    ecological, human health and controlled waters
    receptors
  • Improve land value following remediation.
    Contaminated land is often in urban areas and is
    already serviced by good transport and community
    infrastructure

We need to recognise that not all contaminated
sites are suitable for redevelopment, but value
can be added by mitigating environmental risks
that may later improve a sites strategic and
commercial value!
88
Mechanisms in Place A Sustainable Future?
  • English Partnerships Brownfield Guide A
    Practitioners Guide to Land Reuse in England
    (late 2006). EP involvement since 2003 in policy
    making
  • Communities Local Government Agencies working
    towards ensuring collaborative working across
    pollution / planning process
  • Improvements to human health risk assessment
    framework, currently being rolled out by DEFRA
  • Planning Bill (Nov 2007) aims to balance local
    needs with state objectives
  • PPSs aim to maintain sustainable development on
    previously developed land. Target of 60 of new
    development on previously developed land

89
Guidance Specific to Development on Brownfield
Land
  • PPS23 Annex 2 Development on Land Affected By
    Contamination to ensure the planning process
    plays a key role in determining whether existing
    or future developments are not adversely affected
    by land contamination
  • CLR11 provides a framework within which to assess
    and remediate to a level commensurate with the
    planning and regulatory process
  • EP CLAIRE developing the CLUSTER initiative to
    remediate groups of contaminated sites
  • Remediation Technology reviews by CLAIRE

90
Uncertainties
  • Too much guidance or too many regulatory hurdles?
  • Financial uncertainty associated with remediation
    costs? Technical ability of Practitioners?
  • Stock of derelict land reducing?
  • Need for more joined up approach!
  • Historically landfill disposal of contaminated
    materials was the chosen option provides high
    degree of certainty. No longer the most cost
    effective method of dealing with contamination.
    Changes to tax exemptions from November 2008

Contamination in soil especially groundwater is
cited by the property industry as the most
significant hurdle to redevelopment viability
91
Best Practice Note 27
  • BPN27 published by EP (2008) provides an
    introduction to estimating remediation costs
  • Useful for pre acquisition investigations as part
    of due diligence
  • Presents a model that can be used to form the
    basis of assessing the cost of developing
    contaminated land
  • Does not replace the need for more detailed
    assessments is not definitive

Remediation defined in BPN27 as activities
whose purpose is to prevent, minimise, remedy or
mitigate the effects of harm to human health or
to the wider environment, or pollution of
controlled waters and to restore land or polluted
waters to a state appropriate for its intended
end purpose taking account of environmental
and/or public health requirements
92
BPN27 Remediation Cost Model
  • Provides benchmark costs per hectare
  • Remediation costs vary depending upon site
    sensitivity
  • Site sensitivity based upon end use and site
    environmental setting
  • Allowance in cost ranges to take account of site
    history severity of potential contaminant
    sources
  • Remediation costs excludes demolition, asbestos
    removal geotechnical constraints
  • BPN27 is a starting point for estimating
    contaminated land remediation costs, and should
    not be used as a definitive estimate. Expert
    advice is required to develop a more robust
    remediation cost estimate

93
CLR11 Model Procedures
  • DEFRA guidance
  • Key stages of assessment include
  • Detailed site history
  • Targeted intrusive investigations
  • Generic and detailed quantitative environmental
    risk assessment
  • Preliminary stages of environmental risk
    assessment undertaken to identify key risk
    drivers (eg human health, built environment,
    groundwaters, surface waters)
  • Leads to preparation of outline remediation
    design cost
  • Much more thorough than BPN27

94
CLR11 Outline Remediation Design
  • Key stages are as follows
  • Identify key environmental risk drivers (risk
    assessments)
  • Set remediation criteria for the site
  • Set remediation objectives. This may include
  • Suitability of remediation technologies
  • Timing of development does remediation clean up
    in time
  • Sustainability how green is your approach
    (waste, energy use etc)
  • Economics cost benefit appraisal of different
    combinations of technologies
  • Value engineering

95
Remediation Technology Selection
  • Severity of contamination
  • Degree of clean up required
  • Contaminant mobility in the environment
  • Contaminant mass distribution (phasing)
  • More than one remediation technology might be
    required where contaminant sources are identified
    in both soils (unsaturated) and groundwater
    (dissolved phase)
  • Assess the cost benefit of a series of preferred
    technologies, and include this in the remediation
    options appraisal to be presented to the
    Regulators
  • Larger sites may be more suited to process driven
    technologies

96
Remediation Technologies
  • Treatment technologies methods fall into 5
    broad categories
  • Physical treatments that remove contaminants from
    soil groundwater or provide barriers to prevent
    exposure / movement
  • Biological treatments, which transform or
    mineralise contaminants to a less toxic form
  • Chemical treatments to destroy, fix or neutralise
    toxic components
  • Solidification treatments that immobilise
    contaminants
  • Thermal treatments that destroy or separate
    contaminants from existing soil media

97
Remediation Technology Options
  • Exsitu Remediation (Soils)
  • Soil washing, bioremediation, stabilisation,
    thermal desorption
  • Can be expensive, space restrictions
  • Insitu Treatment (Soils)
  • Barriers (capping systems, cut off walls,
    encapsulation)
  • Stabilisation, bioventing, air sparging, soil
    mixing, augmentation
  • Problematic where extensive ground obstacles
    present
  • Insitu Remediation (Groundwater Free Product
    Removal)
  • Multi-phase extraction, free product removal,
    biosparging, chemical oxidation, funnel gate,
    natural attenuation

98
Ex-situ Soil Remediation
  • Costs dependent upon
  • Mobilisation of plant process equipment
  • Volumes depth of excavation
  • Treated effluent disposal requirements
  • Any waste pre-treatment and / or disposal
  • Temporary works requirements

Soils cannot be polished, so we need to
understand what the implications might be if
residual contamination remains post remediation.
We need to demonstrate by undertaking robust risk
assessment that the clean up standards achieved
are protective of the environment to the
satisfaction of the Regulators
99
Groundwater Remediation
  • Costs dependent upon
  • Size of contaminant plume
  • Source location, whether in the aquifer itself
    (free product) or above the water table in
    unsaturated soils
  • Level of effort required to remediate to protect
    receptors
  • Sensitivity of receptor
  • Toxicity of any by-products
  • Treatment of waste streams eg vapour liquid
    residuals
  • Back up technologies may be required where
    remedial targets are not met

100
Closure
  • Not all brownfield land is contaminated!
  • Liaise with the Regulators early on when
    developing remediation strategy
  • Assess knock on effects of certain remediation
    technologies. Understand the life cycle
    implications of what you are doing. If not seek
    help!
  • Make judgements on cost benefit of particular
    courses of action
  • If still technical doubts, then commission a
    pilot trial
  • Do not apply past experiences to a new site
  • Look at economies of scale where several sites
    share a historical land use
  • Perception is often worse than reality!

101
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102
National Brownfield StrategyInitial
Implementation
Tony Swindells Brownfield Consultant
103
Brownfield Land in EnglandNLUD 2007 Mixed
Vintage
  • Derelict and Vacant brownfield land
  • 31,250 hectares (up 1,800ha / 6.1 on 2006)
  • West Midlands, North West, Yorkshire
  • Unused since 1998 or earlier
  • Physical problems and market failure
  • Brownfield land In Use (Latent)
  • 27,160 hectares (up 3,900ha / 16.9 on 2006)
  • More evenly distributed
  • Significant concentrations in North West, South
    East and South West
  • Generally smaller sites, often with status
    unchanged since 1998

104
Stock Of Vacant/DerelictBrownfield Land In
England
Vacant and/or derelict
105
Stock Of In Use Brownfield Land In England
In Use
106
Regional distribution of Brownfield Land
Vacant and/or derelict
107
Regional distribution of Brownfield Land
In Use
108
National Brownfield StrategyOver-Arching
Principles
  • Redevelop first, paying heed to PPS9 Biodiversity
    and PPS25 Flooding
  • Focus efforts on urban land in towns and cities
    with infrastructure capacity
  • Take account of full environmental impact when
    remediating sites
  • When redevelopment is unsustainable take steps to
    make sites safe and tackle blight
  • Apply highest design standards compatible with
    the economic viability of the site
  • Make brownfield reuse decisions in context with
    the Respect Agenda

109
A Four Strand ApproachTo Implementation
  • Strand One identify, assess and prepare
    brownfield for reuse over the next 15 to 20
    years, to meet demands for all types of land uses
  • Strand Two safeguarding the environment, by
    recognising that not all brownfield land is
    suitable for redevelopment
  • Strand Three enhancing communities, by tackling
    visual and economic blight, then ensuring that
    land is properly maintained in the future
  • Strand Four accreditation and skills, ensuring
    that that a more joined up approach is adopted
    with regard to brownfield land reuse and that
    practitioners have the appropriate skillsets

110
Response From Government
  • Published March 2008 at the English Partnerships
    Brownfield Conference
  • Acceptance of nine recommendations, including
  • Compile Local Brownfield Strategies
  • Assess physical, regulatory and market problems
  • Take steps to prepare the most seriously damaged
    land
  • Improve local communities by tackling visual and
    economic blight associated with small brownfield
    sites
  • Meet the need for appropriately qualified and
    experienced Brownfield Practitioners

111
LBFS Work To Date
  • Initial Local Authority Prioritisation 130
    Local Authorities
  • Brownfield quantity (hectares) NLUD 2006 plotted
    against most deprived Super Output Areas (Index
    of Deprivation, 2007). 130 LAs.
  • Local Authority Workshops 90 Local Authorities
  • To discuss the main over-arching aspects
    preventing brownfield redevelopment. Obtaining
    Local Authority buy-in to LBFS.
  • Final Local Authority Prioritisation 78 Local
    Authorities
  • Worst problem Local Authorities (and most
    interested)
  • LBFS Set Up
  • Logical regions
  • LBFS Work
  • Obtaining full buy-in
  • Discussing local issues conspiring to prevent
    brownfield redevelopment
  • Theory and obtaining data to develop site
    assessment framework

112
North West and West MidlandsLocal Brownfield
Strategies
35 LAs in 7 sub-regional groups (N-S)
  • Cumbria (3)
  • Central Lancashire (3)
  • Greater Manchester and
  • East Lancashire (9)
  • Merseyside (6)
  • Western Cheshire (3)
  • Staffordshire (3)
  • West Midlands andBlack Country (8)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
113
Local Brownfield Strategies(With A Difference)
50 LAs in 2 sub-regional groups
  • South East (17)
  • Particular problem with In Use land
  • Learn from that work
  • London (33)
  • All London Boroughs
  • Joint work with London Development Agency

L
SE
114
Hints On How To Tackle Brownfield Land?
  • the way we use land fundamentally affects our
    economy, the environment and our social cohesion

Speech by Rt Hon David Miliband MP, 10 May
2007 Centenary Conference of the Country Land and
Business Association, London "Economy,
Environment, Community The Next Decades
how we use land is a fundamental issue in
planning we have a duty to safeguard for future
generations the wide range of environmental goods
and services provided by sustainable land use
Kate barker, December 2006 Barker Review of Land
Use Planning Final Report Recommendations
115
Sustainable Uses Of Brownfield Land
Social
Financial
Environment
116
Local Brownfield Strategy Process
Site Identification
NLUD
LDA
NLUD Plus
SPSL Register
Economic/ Financial
Environment
Data gap analysis /or Sustainability index
adjustments
Sustainability Index
Social
National Land Use Database (NLUD) Scoping Study
outcomes / revision
Site Ranking G A R
South Eastern Region In Use Brownfield Study
London Region Local Brownfield Strategy with LDA
Consultation with LAs partners
Local Brownfield Strategy
No
Yes
117
Local Brownfield StrategiesWeb Enabled GIS Tool
  • Most Local Authorities dont have access to
    desk-based GIS!
  • Polygons of sites!
  • Contextual information
  • Simple spatial analysis tools
  • Decision making tool not simply data presentation
  • Report functionality
  • Frequent updates
  • Multiple access levels
  • EP/HCA/CLG LAs
  • Developers
  • Public

118
Possible User Interface
119
Local Brownfield StrategiesPrioritisation of
Sites
MONITOR THESE SITES.
NEED TO CONCENTRATE ON THESE SITES.
BUT DEFINITELY CANNOT FORGET ABOUT THESE!
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