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TexTESOL

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Title: TexTESOL


1
  • TexTESOL
  • Onward and Upward Meeting Needs of ELLs Through
    Instruction and Assessment
  • Texas Education Agency
  • November 7, 2008

2
  • Bilingual/ESL Program Updates
  • Slides 3-28
  • Instruction
  • Slides 29-77
  • Assessment
  • Slides 78-136

3
  • Meeting Needs of ELLs Through Instruction
  • Georgina González, Director
  • Susie Coultress, Assistant Director
  • Bilingual/ESL Unit
  • Curriculum Division
  • Texas Education Agency

4
Texas ELL Population
  • 775,645 ELLs in EE-12, over 600,000 in K-12
  • Over 120 languages represented in Texas schools
  • 92 Spanish speakers 711,388
  • Prominent languages other than Spanish
  • 14,094 Vietnamese
  • 3,627 Urdu
  • 3,594 Arabic
  • 3,195 Korean
  • About 10.09 of ELLs served by special education
  • ELLs represent about 16 of the total students in
    Texas

PEIMS Fall 2007
5
ELL Special Language Programs
Texas ELL Special Language Program Participation
  • ELLs 775,645
  • Bilingual 422,377
  • ESL 297,553
  • ELL Parental Denials 49,071

PEIMS Fall 2007
6
LEP Student Success Initiative (LEP SSI) Program
Appropriations
  • The 78th Texas Legislature
  • 2004-05 Biennium - 10 million each year
  • The 79th Texas Legislature
  • 2006-07 Biennium - 10 million each year
  • The 80th Texas Legislature
  • 2008-09 Biennium - 9.7 million each year

7
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8
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9
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10
Promoting Academic Success and Accountability for
English Language Learners (PASA)
  • Superintendents, administrators, classroom
    teachers, and curriculum specialists who work
    with English language learners are encouraged to
    attend this event on January 20-21, 2009, at the
    Austin Convention Center.
  • To register for the conference and hotel, please
    visit the following website www.esc13.net/pasa.
  • If you are interested in receiving funding for
    teachers to attend the PASA conference, contact
    your regional education service center
    Bilingual/ESL representative.

11
Texas Prekindergarten Guidelines
  • The Texas Education Agency (TEA) tasked the State
    Center for Early Childhood Development with
    facilitating the process to revise the Texas
    Prekindergarten Guidelines. The revised
    guidelines were developed with the expertise of
    writing teams and state and national experts,
    along with input gathered from public forums
    across the state and written comments submitted
    during the public comment period.

12
Texas Prekindergarten Guidelines
  • This feedback was incorporated into the
    guidelines which were then approved by the
    commissioner of education on May 21, 2008, and
    presented to the State Board of Education for
    review on May 22, 2008. The guidelines will
    remain voluntary and will guide publishers in
    revising prekindergarten instructional materials
    in the future.
  • http//www.tea.state.tx.us/ed_init/pkguidelines/PK
    G_Final_090908.pdf

13
PEIMS Changes
  • PEIMS used to collect information only on a
    student being LEP
  • Yes No
  • Bilingual Program
  • English as a Second Language (ESL) Program
  • LEP Served Money

14
PEIMS Changes
  • (d) The bilingual education program shall be
    implemented through one of the following program
    models

15
PEIMS Changes
  • (1) Transitional bilingual/early exit - a
    bilingual program that serves students identified
    as students of limited English proficiency in
    both English and Spanish, or another language,
    and transfers students to English-only
    instruction. It provides instruction in literacy
    and academic content areas through the medium of
    the students first language, along with
    instruction in English oral and academic language
    development. Non-academic subjects such as art,
    music, and physical education may also be taught
    in English.

16
PEIMS Changes
  • (1) Transitional bilingual/early exit (cont)
  • Exiting to an all English program of instruction
    will occur not earlier than the end of first
    grade, or if the student enrolls in school during
    or after first grade, the student will remain in
    the program for a minimum of two to five years
    before being eligible to exit the bilingual
    program. Students that have met exit criteria in
    accordance with TAC 89.1225 (h)(i)(k) may
    continue receiving services but the school
    district will not be allocated the bilingual
    allotment - TEC 42.153. Students who are
    proficient in English may also be served in this
    program only with appropriate parental
    permission, but are not eligible for Bilingual
    Program allotment.

17
PEIMS Changes
  • (2) Transitional bilingual/late exit - a
    bilingual program that serves students identified
    as students of limited English proficiency in
    both English and Spanish, or another language,
    and transfers a student to English-only
    instruction academic growth is accelerated
    through cognitively challenging academic work in
    the students first language along with
    meaningful academic content taught through the
    students second language, English.

18
PEIMS Changes
  • (2) Transitional bilingual/late exit - (cont)
  • The goal is to promote high levels of academic
    achievement and full academic language
    proficiency in the students first language and
    English. Students enrolled in the transitional
    bilingual/late exit program are eligible to exit
    the program not earlier than six or later than
    seven years after the students enroll in school.
    Students that have met exit criteria in
    accordance with TAC 89.1225 (h)(i)(k) may
    continue receiving services but the school
    district will not be allocated the bilingual
    allotment - TEC 42.153. Students who are
    proficient in English may also be served in this
    program only with appropriate parental
    permission, but are not eligible for Bilingual
    Program allotment.

19
  • 3) Dual language immersion/two-way - (cont) a
    biliteracy program that integrates students
    proficient in English and students identified as
    students of limited English proficiency in both
    English and Spanish, or another language, and
    transfers a student identified as a student of
    limited English proficiency to English-only
    instruction instruction is provided to both
    native English speakers and native speakers of
    another language in an instructional setting
    where language learning is integrated with
    content instruction.

PEIMS Changes
20
  • 3) Dual language immersion/two-way - (cont)
  • Academic subjects are taught to all students
    through both English and the other language.
    Program exit will occur not earlier than six or
    later than seven years after the student enrolls
    in school students that have met exit criteria
    in accordance with TAC 89.1225 (h)(i)(k) may
    continue receiving services but the school
    district will not be allocated the bilingual
    allotment - TEC 42.153.

PEIMS Changes
21
PEIMS Changes
  • (4) Dual language immersion/one-way - a
    biliteracy program that serves only students
  • identified as students of limited English
    proficiency in both English and Spanish, or
    another language, and transfers a student to
    English-only instruction in an instructional
    setting where language learning is integrated
    with content instruction. Academic subjects are
    taught to all students through both English and
    the other language. Program exit will occur not
    earlier than six or later than seven years after
    the student enrolls in school students that have
    met exit criteria in accordance with TAC 89.1225
    (h)(i)(k) may continue receiving services but the
    school district will not be allocated the
    bilingual allotment - TEC 42.153. Students who
    are proficient in English may also be served in
    this program only with appropriate parental
    permission, but are not eligible for Bilingual
    Program allotment.

22
PEIMS Changes
  • (h) The English as a second language program
    shall be implemented through one of the following
    program models

23
PEIMS Changes
  • (1) English as a second language/content-based
  • Is an English program that serves students
    identified as students of limited English
    proficiency in English only by providing a
    full-time teacher certified under TEC 29.061(c)
    to provide supplementary instruction for all
    content area instruction it integrates
    English-as-a-second-language instruction and
    sheltered instructional strategies with subject
    matter instruction which focuses not only on
    learning a second language, but using that
    language as a medium to learn mathematics,
    science, social studies, or other academic
    subjects.

24
PEIMS Changes
  • (1) English as a second language/content-based
    (cont)
  • Exiting to an all English program of
    instruction will occur not earlier than the end
    of first grade, or if the student enrolls in
    school during or after first grade, the student
    will remain in the program for a minimum of two
    to five years before being eligible to exit the
    ESL program students that have met state
    requirements for exit criteria in accordance with
    89.1225 may continue receiving services but the
    school district will not be allocated the
    bilingual allotment - TEC 42.153

25
PEIMS Changes
  • (2) English as a second language/pull-out Is an
    English program that serves students identified
    as students of limited English proficiency in
    English only by providing a certified teacher
    under TEC 29.061(c) to provide English language
    arts instruction exclusively, while the student
    remains in a mainstream instructional arrangement
    in the remaining content areas instruction may
    be provided by the ESL teacher in a pull-out or
    inclusionary delivery model exiting to all
    English program of instruction will occur not
    earlier than the end of first grade, or if the
    student enrolls in school during or after first
    grade, the student will remain in the program for
    a minimum of two to five years before being
    eligible to exit the ESL program students that
    have met state requirements for exit criteria in
    accordance with 89.1225 may continue receiving
    services but the school district will not be
    allocated the bilingual allotment TEC 42.153. 
    If a program does not meet the definition of
    either a content-based or pull-out program, the
    student should be reported as in a pull-out
    program.

26
PEIMS Changes
  • For all of the program models students that have
    met exit criteria in accordance with 89.1225 may
    continue receiving services but the school
    district will not be allocated the bilingual
    allotment (TEC) 42.153.

27
PEIMS Changes
  • F M1 Monitored 1 or S Monitored 2 LEP status
    is reported for those students who have recently
    been exited from the bilingual/ESL programs and
    are determined to no longer be Limited English
    Proficient (LEP). This information is reported
    for the first two school years on all students
    who have exited LEP status.

28
PEIMS Changes
  • F M1 SM2 student has met criteria for
    bilingual/ESL program exit, is no longer
    classified as LEP in PEIMS, and is in his or her
    first or second year of monitoring as required by
    19 TAC 89.1220(l) and are not eligible for
    funding due to the fact that they are not
    receiving bilingual or ESL services.

29
English Language Proficiency Standards
  • The newly approved 19 TAC 74.4, English Language
    Proficiency Standards (ELPS), presents English
    language proficiency standards that outline the
    instruction school districts must provide to ELLs
    in order for them to have the full opportunity to
    learn English and to succeed academically. 
  • The rule also clarifies that the ELPS are to be
    implemented as an integral part of the
    instruction in each foundation and enrichment
    subject of the TEKS.  http//www.tea.state.tx.us/
    rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html

30
English Language Proficiency Standards
  • While the English as a second language (ESL)
    standards have always applied to the teaching of
    all content areas, the ESL TEKS were only located
    in 19 TAC Chapter 128 with Language Arts and
    Reading.

31
English Language Proficiency Standards
32
English Language Proficiency Standards
  • During a Title III monitoring visit, the U.S.
    Department of Education indicated that there was
    insufficient evidence demonstrating that the ESL
    standards found in 19 TAC Chapter 128 were
    aligned to state academic content and achievement
    standards, as required by Section 3113(b)(2) of
    NCLB. The adoption of the revised ELPS as part
    of 19 TAC Chapter 74, Curriculum Requirements,
    reinforces that these standards are aligned with
    and apply to all academic content areas.

33
Proclamation 2010
  • The State Board of Education issued Proclamation
    2010 on November 16, 2007. The SBOE amended
    Proclamation 2010, to include the Spanish
    Language Arts TEKS in the fall of 2008. The
    adoption of materials under Proclamation 2010
    will occur in November 2009. The adopted
    materials will be available for use beginning
    with the 2010-2011 school year.
  • Proclamation 2010  (Adobe Acrobat file, 124
    pages)
  • http//www.tea.state.tx.us/textbooks/proclamations
    /proc2010/proc2010.pdf

34
Proclamation 2010
  • The URL for the draft of Spanish TEKS K-6 is
    http//www.tea.state.tx.us/teks/spanish/
  • Phonics, spelling, and grammar have been
    carefully scaffolded commensurate to the needs of
    ELL students by the Spanish Language Arts and
    Reading TEKS Writing Committee.  

35
Proclamation 2010 ELPS
  • ELPS materials will be available for every high
    school teacher. For instance, if a high school
    teacher has ELLs in their classroom the ELPS
    materials would be resource materials to help the
    teacher with that student population in the
    classroom regardless of the subject matter.
  • ESL materials for grades K-8 are in Proclamation
    2011 to help teachers address the needs of second
    language learners in their classrooms. TEA
    wanted to be sure that teachers had support
    materials for ELLs in the secondary classroom.
    By including the new ELPS to Proclamation 2010,
    teachers will be able to access materials to
    support these students. It should also be noted
    that these materials are not companions to any
    particular set of student materials. It is a
    separate call for secondary teachers at the
    grades 9-12. This was an important component of
    moving the ELPS into Chapter 74 so that so it is
    not perceived as applying only to ELA.

36
English Language Proficiency Standards
  • The English language proficiency standards
    include 4 components
  • a) Introduction
  • b) School District Requirements
  • c) Cross-curricular second language acquisition
    TEKS and
  • d) Proficiency Level Descriptors

37
English Language Proficiency Standards
  • 74.4. English Language Proficiency Standards.
  • (a)  Introduction.
  • (1)  The English language proficiency standards
    in this section outline English language
    proficiency level descriptors and student
    expectations for English language learners
    (ELLs). School districts shall implement this
    section as an integral part of each subject in
    the required curriculum. The English language
    proficiency standards are to be published along
    with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills
    (TEKS) for each subject in the required
    curriculum.

38
English Language Proficiency Standards
  • (b)  School district responsibilities. In
    fulfilling the requirements of this section,
    school districts shall
  • (1)  identify the student's English language
    proficiency levels in the domains of listening,
    speaking, reading, and writing in accordance with
    the proficiency level descriptors for the
    beginning, intermediate, advanced, and advanced
    high levels delineated in subsection (d) of this
    section

39
English Language Proficiency Standards-
Cross-curricular second language acquisition TEKS
  • (1)  Cross-curricular second language
    acquisition/learning strategies. 8 student
    expectations
  • (2)  Cross-curricular second language
    acquisition/listening. 9 student expectations
  • (3)  Cross-curricular second language
    acquisition/speaking. 10 student expectations
  • (4)  Cross-curricular second language
    acquisition/reading. 11 student expectations
  • (5)  Cross-curricular second language
    acquisition/writing. 7 student expectations

40
(No Transcript)
41
What are English Language Proficiency Standards
and How Are They Used?
  • Summarizing the previous information we can say
    that prior to 2008, the English Language
    Proficiency Standards (ELPSs) have been listed in
    the English Language Arts TEKS, but teachers in
    all subjects and grade levels are and have been
    accountable for providing appropriate instruction
    for English Language Learners.

42
What are English Language Proficiency Standards
and How Are They Used?
  • In order to make this expectation more explicit,
    starting in 2008, the English Language ELPSs have
    been incorporated into the TEKS for each subject
    area, including electives.

43
What are English Language Proficiency Standards
and How Are They Used?
  • Because of this recent change and in order to
    better support teachers in the instruction of
    English Language Learners, the MELL Lesson Bank
    Editors have listed the ELPS at the end of the
    plan and have checked those standards that, in
    their opinion, are integrated into the lesson.
  • http//www.tsusmell.org/products/lessonbank.html

44
ELPS Professional Development
  • A number of professional development activities
    related to the ELPS are being developed
  • A web portal designed to provide an
    administrative overview of the ELPS will be
    available at the end of 2008.  The portal is
    being developed in partnership with the Region II
    Education Service Center (ESC).
  • The Region I ESC TESORO Project will incorporate
    the ELPS in the professional development entitled
    Building Connections in High School Content Areas
    through Sheltered Instruction.

45
ELPS Professional Development
  • The University of Texas-El Paso, through the
    Learning, Encouraging, And Planning to Uplift
    Performance (LEAP UP) project, has developed
    training on the imbedding of ELPS throughout the
    content areas, beginning with math.  Plans are
    being developed for a trainer of trainers
    professional development session via the Texas
    Education Telecommunications Network (TETN).

46
ELPS Professional Development
  • All ESCs will conduct professional development in
    the fall of 2009 on the revised ELAR TEKS, which
    will incorporate the ELPS.
  • Instructional materials incorporating the ELPS
    will be provided for all high school teachers in
    the fall of 2010.  Proclamation 2011 will provide
    instructional materials for Grades PreK-8 to be
    in schools for the fall of 2011.
  • Dates and other information pertinent to these
    professional development activities will be
    forthcoming.

47
Academic Listening Sample What Might a Beginning
Listener Understand?
  • Good morning, class. Today we are going to study
    something brand new. Its difficult, so Im going
    to need everyones undivided attention. Open
    your books to page one hundred seventy-two. At
    the top of the page is the word net. Todays
    lesson is about net. As it says in the definition
    in your book, in math, net is a two-dimensional
    model. The net of a cylinder is shown in your
    textbook. Does everyone see the rectangle and two
    circles? Thats the net of the cylinder.

Source TELPAS Training
48
In Other Words
  • Good morning … Today … Open your books to page
    one … top … page … Todays … book … math … two …
    book … rectangle … two circles…

Source TELPAS Training
49
Academic Listening Sample What Might an
Intermediate Listener Understand?
  • Good morning, class. Today we are going to
    study something brand new. Its difficult, so Im
    going to need everyones undivided attention.
    Open your books to page one hundred seventy-two.
    At the top of the page is the word net. Todays
    lesson is about net. As it says in the definition
    in your book, in math, net is a two-dimensional
    model. The net of a cylinder is shown in your
    textbook. Does everyone see the rectangle and two
    circles? Thats the net of the cylinder.

Source TELPAS Training
50
In Other Words
Good morning, class. Today we are going to
study … Its difficult … going to need everyones
… Open your books to page one hundred … top of
the page … Todays lesson … your book, in math …
two … cylinder … book … rectangle and two circles
… cylinder.
Source TELPAS Training
51
Academic Listening Sample What Might an Advanced
Listener Understand?
  • Good morning, class. Today we are going to
    study something brand new. Its difficult, so Im
    going to need everyones undivided attention.
    Open your books to page one hundred seventy-two.
    At the top of the page is the word net. Todays
    lesson is about net. As it says in the
    definition in your book, in math, net is a
    two-dimensional model. The net of a cylinder is
    shown in your textbook. Does everyone see the
    rectangle and two circles? Thats the net of the
    cylinder.

Source TELPAS Training
52
In Other Words
  • Good morning, class. Today we are going to
    study something … new. Its difficult, so Im
    going to need everyones … Open your books to
    page one hundred seventy-two. At the top of the
    page is the word … Todays lesson is … definition
    in your book, in math, net is a two … a cylinder
    is … in your textbook. Does everyone see the
    rectangle and two circles? … cylinder.

Source TELPAS Training
53
Academic Listening Sample What Might an Advanced
High Listener Understand?
  • Good morning, class. Today we are going to
    study something brand new. Its difficult, so Im
    going to need everyones undivided attention.
    Open your books to page one hundred seventy-two.
    At the top of the page is the word net. Todays
    lesson is about net. As it says in the
    definition in your book, in math, net is a
    two-dimensional model. The net of a cylinder is
    shown in your textbook. Does everyone see the
    rectangle and two circles? Thats the net of the
    cylinder.

Source TELPAS Training
54
Reflect on how well the student understands the
English he or she hears during activities such as
  • Reacting to oral presentations
  • Responding to text read aloud
  • Following directions
  • Cooperative group work
  • Informal, social discourse with peers
  • Large-group and small-group interactions in
    academic settings
  • One-on-one interviews
  • Individual student conferences

Listening
What are the implications for instruction?
Source adapted from Region 1 ESC
55
Science7th Grade
  • Learning Strategies
  • ELPS (1)(C) Use strategic learning techniques
    such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing,
    comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire
    basic and grade-level vocabulary.
  • TEKS 7(b)(14)  Science concepts. The student
    knows that natural events and human activity can
    alter Earth systems. The student is expected to
  • (A)  Describe and predict the impact of
    different catastrophic events on Earth.

56
Concept of Definition Map
(Swartz and Raphael, 1985)
57
Beginning-Learning Strategies
58
Intermediate-Learning Strategies
  • A hurricane is a storm that can destroy cities
    along the coast.

59
Advanced-Learning Strategies
60
Advanced High-Learning Strategies
61
Career Technical Education-High School
(CTE)Nutrition and Food
  • Writing
  • ELPS-(c )5 The student is expected to (G)
    Narrate, describe, and explain with increasing
    specificity and detail to fulfill content area
    writing needs as more English is acquired.
  • TEKS(1) Principles of nutrition. The student
    utilizes information about the basic principles
    of nutrition to promote healthy food choices. The
    student is expected to (B) Identify the
    nutrients, their functions, and food sources.

62
Characterization Chart Table of Minerals, Bodily
Functions, and Food Sources
Mineral
Function in the Body
Food Source
Calcium
Iron
Potassium
Zinc
63
Beginning-Writing
  • The student is expected to write additional food
    sources for two of the nutrients listed. The
    student may use the picture bank organized in the
    classroom to assist them.

Food Source
Milk, Cheese, Yogurt (sources of calcium)
Shrimp, Chicken, Flounder (sources of iron)
Spinach, ___, _____ (sources of potassium)
Pecans, ___, ______ (sources of zinc)
64
Intermediate-Writing
  • The student is expected to write additional food
    sources for all four nutrients listed using a
    word wall. The student will also include any key
    words to describe some attributes to support the
    response.

Food Source
Milk, Cheese, Yogurt ____________________
Shrimp, Chicken, Flounder _____________________
Spinach, Tomato paste, Clams, ________________
Pecans, Chickpeas, Ginger root,______________
65
Advanced-Writing
  • The student is expected to respond in writing in
    complete sentences.

Function in the Body
Calcium keeps bones and teeth strong.
Iron keeps blood healthy.
Potassium supports the nervous system.
Zinc keeps bones and teeth strong.
66
Advanced High-Writing
  • The student is expected to write in complete
    sentences with clarity, fewer errors, and a more
    academic tone than the advanced-level student.

Function in the Body
Calcium keeps bones and teeth strong.
Iron helps the blood transport oxygen from
the lungs to the tissue cells.
Potassium is critical to nerve function, muscle
control, and blood pressure.
Zinc helps the body to convert food into energy
and also helps the body control blood sugar
levels.
67
Required Support for ELLs
Intensive and ongoing foundational
second language acquisition instruction to
ELLs in Grade 3 or higher who are at the
beginning or intermediate level of
English proficiency in listening, speaking,
reading, and/or writing as determined by
the states English language proficiency assessmen
t system.
  • Intensive and ongoing foundational second
  • language acquisition instruction to ELLs
  • in Grade 3 or higher who are at the
  • beginning or intermediate level of English
  • proficiency in listening, speaking, reading,
  • and/or writing as determined by the
  • states English language proficiency
  • assessment system.

68
Achieving Success
  • What does it mean to provide focused, targeted,
    and systematic second language acquisition
    instruction to provide ELLs with the foundation
    of English language vocabulary, grammar, syntax,
    and English mechanics necessary to support
    content-based instruction and accelerated
    learning of English?

Accelerated Learning Techniques
69
Further Explanation
70
Differentiated English Instruction
71
Additional Considerations
Teachers need to be well versed in
  • Proven methods and techniques in second language
    acquisition
  • English literacyusing both phonetic and whole
    language approaches
  • The writing processincluding techniques such as
    the Language Experience Approach
  • Appropriate and alternative assessment for
    ELLsincluding assessing in the native language
    whenever possible

72
Former LEP Students
  • The following slides show three school districts
    former LEP students reaching the highest levels
    of achievement as valedictorians and
    salutatorians.
  • This information should encourage and motivate
    every educator in the state to implement all the
    programs available to them through the state
    legislature as reflected in the Texas Education
    Code.

73
Austin ISD Valedictorians and Salutatorians
Spring 2001-2008 that started as LEP Students
74
Dallas ISD Valedictorians and Salutatorians
2001-2008 that started as LEP Students
75
Houston ISD 2001-2008 Valedictorians that started
as LEP Students
76
Houston ISD 2001-2008 Salutatorians that started
as LEP Students
77
Join our listserv!
  • Go to http//www.tea.state.tx.us/list
  • Click on Select a List from drop-down menu
  • Scroll down select Bilingual/ESL Education
  • Click on Join or Leave
  • Enter your e-mail address and name
  • Click on Join button
  • An e-mail confirmation will be sent which must be
    replied to in order to complete the listserv
    process
  • To change, delete, or add an additional e-mail
    address, go back to www.tea.state.tx.us/list

78
Meeting Needs of ELLs Through Assessment
  • Laura Ayala
  • ELL Assessment Director
  • Student Assessment Division
  • Texas Education Agency

79
Road Weve Traveled
  • Changing purposes of testing
  • Changing perceptions about test exemptions
  • Changing comfort level with accommodations
  • Changing views on English language proficiency
    testing
  • Changing roles of teachers in assessing and
    meeting ELL needs

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Road Were On
  • Aligned goals for learning and testing of English
    language proficiency through ELPS and TELPAS
  • Academic skills tests (TAKS) available in Spanish
    in elementary grades
  • For federal accountability in required grades and
    subjects, LEP exemptions replaced with inclusion
    of recent immigrant ELLs through linguistically
    accommodated TAKS tests (LAT)
  • Student performance of ex-LEP students reported
    for first two years after reclassification as
    non-LEP

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The ELPS list the following
  • Cross-curricular second language acquisition
    student expectations
  • Proficiency level descriptors

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Example Student Expectations
  • Learning strategies
  • c.1.D  Speak using learning strategies such as
    requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues,
    and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying
    ideas by defining or describing when exact
    English words are not known)
  • Listening
  • c.2.E Use visual, contextual, and linguistic
    support to enhance and confirm understanding of
    increasingly complex and elaborated spoken
    language

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Example Student Expectations
  • Speaking
  • c.3.G  Express opinions, ideas, and feelings
    ranging from communicating single words and short
    phrases to participating in extended discussions
    on a variety of social and grade-appropriate
    academic topics
  • Reading
  • c.4.G Demonstrate comprehension of increasingly
    complex English by participating in shared
    reading, retelling or summarizing material,
    responding to questions, and taking notes
    commensurate with content area and grade level
    needs

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Example Student Expectations
  • Writing
  • c.5.G  Narrate, describe, and explain with
    increasing specificity and detail to fulfill
    content area writing needs as more English is
    acquired

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TELPAS
TELPAS
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TELPAS Alignment to ELPS
  • TELPAS listening, speaking, reading, and writing
    assessments measure (align with) ELPS
    cross-curricular student expectations.
  • This presentation will show examples of the way
    TELPAS measures reading and writing ELPS.

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Aligned Proficiency Level Descriptors
  • The ELPS and TELPAS both identify 4 proficiency
    levels (Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced, and
    Advanced High).
  • The ELPS and TELPAS use same proficiency level
    descriptors to define these 4 stages (levels) of
    English language proficiency.

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TELPAS Reading for Grades 212
  • New version implemented in spring 2008
  • Replaced former RPTE tests
  • Adds a grade 2 test
  • Includes more test questions at the highest
    proficiency level (advanced high)
  • Has more questions that tap ability to read the
    English encountered in math and science classes
  • To be administered as an online assessment program

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TELPAS Reading Information Booklet
  • Preliminary version is on TEA Student Assessment
    Division website
  • Contains sample test items showing all text
    types, including how reading in math and science
    contexts is assessed
  • Updated version to be posted on TEA Student
    Assessment Division website -- Fall 2008
  • Updated version to include alignment with revised
    ELP standards

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TELPAS Reading Objectives
  • The TELPAS reading test reports results for 3
    assessment objectives
  • 1 - Word Meaning and Language Structures
  • 2 - Basic Understanding of English Texts
  • 3 - Analysis and Evaluation of English Texts

Assessment objectives categorize the tested
skills in meaningful ways for reporting student
performance.
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Types of Reading Selections
  • Narratives similar to those on reading section of
    TAKS
  • Informational selections similar to those on
    reading section of TAKS
  • Basic functional pieces used in real life
    (posters, class schedules, ads, etc.)
  • Content area reading material with math and
    science applications

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Types of Test Items
  • Stand-alone items not related to a reading
    selection
  • Questions over a reading selection
  • Cloze items within a content area reading
    selection

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Early Beginning Level
  • Objective 1 Word Meaning and Language Structures

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Questions About Pictures
  • Objective 2 Demonstrate Basic Understanding of
    Text

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New TELPAS Reading Item Type
  • Content Area Cloze Stand-Alone a stand-alone
    item type that requires students to find the
    missing word in a short paragraph that students
    might read in math or science class
  • Usually assesses advanced or advanced high
    proficiency level
  • Assesses Objective 1 Word meaning and language
    structures

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Content Area Cloze Items
Grades 8-9 (Science)
  • Grades 2 (Math)

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Content Area Cloze Item
  • Grades 10-12
  • (Math)

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New Types of Reading Selections
  • Content Area Cloze Selection short selection on
    math or science topic with several blanks to fill
    in assesses Objective 1 Word Meaning and
    Language Structures
  • Content-Based Reading Selection similar to a
    traditional narrative with questions, but
    involves application of math or science skill
    assesses all three test objectives

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Content Area Cloze Selection
  • Grades 6-7

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Content Area Cloze Items
  • Grades 6-7

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Content Area Cloze Selection
  • Grade 3

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Content Area Cloze Items
  • Grade 3

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Math-Based Reading Selection
  • Grades 4-5

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Example Items
1
  • Grades 4-5

3
4
2
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Math-Based Reading Selection
  • Grades 8-9

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Continued…
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Continued...
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Example Items
1
2
3
  • Grades 8-9

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ELA-Based Reading Selection (Excerpt)
Grades 10-12
Continues for 3 pages
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Example Items
1
2
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Science Writing Assignment from a TELPAS
Writing Collection
Grade 8
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Math Writing Assignment from a TELPAS Writing
Collection
Grade 5
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Grades 312 TELPAS Results Students at Each
Proficiency Level
  • B Beginning
  • I Intermediate
  • A Advanced
  • H Advanced High

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Domain Weights of Composite Ratings
  • Composite ratings combine ratings from each
    language domain into a single proficiency rating.
  • Composite ratings are the measure used in federal
    AMAO accountability measures for ELLs.
  • Reading is weighted most heavily, followed by
    writing.
  • These domain weights have been used since
    2005-2006 but may change in the future.

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Grades 312 Composite TELPAS Proficiency
Ratings Students at Each Proficiency Level
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TAKS Results (Selected Math Grades)
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Spring 2008 Grade 5 TAKS Math Primary SSI
Administration, Percent Passing
No. Numbers tested
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Spring 2008 Grade 8 TAKS Math Primary SSI
Administration, Percent Passing
No. Numbers tested
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Spring 2007 and 2008 Grade 10 TAKS Math Primary
SSI Administration, Percent Passing
No. Numbers tested
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LAT TAKS Math, Science, Reading Grades 3-8 and 10
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Linguistically Accommodated Instruction ELPS
Requirement
  • Chapter 74.4 (b)(2)
  • School districts shall provide instruction in the
    knowledge and skills of the foundation and
    enrichment curriculum in a manner that is
    linguistically accommodated (communicated,
    sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the
    student's levels of English language proficiency
    to ensure that the student learns the knowledge
    and skills in the required curriculum.

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Allowable LAT Accommodations for TAKS Math and
Science Grades 38 and 10
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Allowable LAT Accommodations for TAKS
Reading/ELA Grades 38 and 10
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LAT Spring 2008 Reading, Math, and Science
Percent Passing
ELA for grade 10
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The Road Traveled
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Then and Now Grade 4 Writing of ELLs
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Then and Now English Reading Proficiency Percent
Receiving Proficiency Level Rating of Beginning
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Then and Now TAKS Reading Percent of ELLs
Passing
Primary SSI Administrations Panel Recommended
Standards
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Then and Now LAT Math Percent Passing
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Where We May Be Headed
TELPAS Increased Accountability Expectations
TAKS More Focus on Student Growth (Not Just
Passing)
LAT Providing Linguistic Accommodations on
Additional Tests
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TEA ELL Information
  • Curriculum Division-Bilingual/ESL Unit
  • Go to http//www.tea.state.tx.us/curriculum/bili
    ng/
  • Phone (512) 463-9581
  • Student Assessment Division ELL Testing
  • Go to www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment
  • and click on ELL Assessment Information
  • E-mail ELL.tests_at_tea.state.tx.us
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