Value Stream Mapping TraintheTrainer - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Value Stream Mapping TraintheTrainer


1
Value Stream Mapping Train-the-Trainer
2
Information For A Process Data Box(to be
collected on the shop floor)
  • Cycle time
  • Changeover time
  • Process reliability (uptime)
  • Scrap/Rework/Defect rate
  • Number of product variations
  • Number of operators
  • Production batch sizes
  • Working time (minus breaks)
  • Pack size

3
Typical Steps to Complete a Current State Drawing
  • Document customer information
  • Complete a quick walk through to identify the
    main processes (i.e., how many process boxes)
  • Fill in data boxes, draw inventory triangles, and
    count inventory
  • Document supplier information
  • Establish information flow how does each process
    know what to make next?
  • Identify where material is being pushed
  • Quantify production leadtime vs. processing time

4
Frequently Asked Questions Make to Order and
Engineer to Order Shops
  • Many shops have a combination of repetitive and
    non-repetitive products (indicating product
    families)
  • Product families might be difficult to see
    focus on machines/operations and work content
    time
  • Engineering might be included in the information
    flow for leadtime impact, etc.
  • Pitch is typically arbitrary to the manager
  • Employment of pitch requires detailed knowledge
    of work content and routings for jobs

5
FAQ Distribution Centers Example
(Information flow on top)
I
I
I
I
I
6
FAQ Parallel Manufacturing Flows
  • Keep it simple, and make sure to leave room for
    the data boxes!

7
FAQ Including Subassemblies
  • Focus on major subassemblies first
  • Select one or two which might represent different
    types of situations
  • Generic vs. specific to the product family
  • Outsourced tasks within assembly
  • Follow the format for parallel flow, and always
    include the main assembly process!
  • For large fabricating and assembly operations,
    consider maps for each major subassembly with a
    macro map indicating the entire product family

8
FAQ Do We Really Have a Supermarket (or FIFO
lane)?
  • Supermarkets (and FIFO lanes) control production
    between points of flow without a written
    schedule.
  • What is the trigger for production in this area
    of the value stream?
  • Is the upstream process overproducing?
  • If there is a scheduling system present outside
    of a pure pull, chances are that there is no
    supermarket.

9
FAQ Outsourcing
3 Days
2 days
.7 days
60 min.
10
FAQ Long Processing Times vs. Production
Leadtimes
8 hours
3 days
1 day
8 hours
11
FAQ Cycle Times vs. Work Content
  • Work content is important to understand costs and
    in balancing flow
  • Consider all machine and manual work content,
    regardless of the cycle time
  • Accumulate all parallel operations in the
    processing timeline

Cycle Time 30 sec Work Content ? 150 sec.
5
12
FAQ Different Changeover Cycle Times, etc.
  • Current state mapping might uncover
  • Several different machines performing the same
    operation
  • Different products within the family with
    different data box characteristics for a specific
    process
  • Capture the range of values as opposed to an
    average value

13
FAQ Mapping Final Inspection/ Repair/Rework
  • Judgment counts!
  • Minimal repair/rework might be captured as a data
    attribute at the final step.
  • If nearly every part needs assessment or extra
    work, consider a separate process box.

14
FAQ Supplier Data Boxes
  • Data attributes are dependent on the value stream
    and supplier. Minimum information might include

L/T 3 weeks
Batch 3 Tons
Min. Batch 2T
2 Scrap
15
FAQ Pull Within an MRP Environment
  • A combination push and pull is usually just a
    push system!
  • Multiple production triggers typically lead to
    overproduction.

16
FAQ Assemble-to-Order Options in a Future State
  • Finished goods supermarkets can be expensive in
    value streams which have many finished part
    numbers within a product family
  • To minimize inventory costs, try to find the
    upstream location where the value stream has very
    few variations and consider a supermarket of WIP
    at that point.
  • Customers orders can drop to this location,
    with FIFO lanes controlling production into
    shipping.

17
FAQ Assemble-to-Order Options in a Future State
Customer Orders
OXOX
18
FAQ Why Not Just Start Pulling Tomorrow?
  • Initiating a pull system without first attempting
    to flow will result in lots of supermarkets, and
    may increase your inventory levels.
  • Design your future state with the following
    sequence
  • Flow wherever you can (while still pushing)
  • Produce to the TAKT (while still pushing)
  • Implement a pull system

19
FAQ Administrative Mapping Part 1 Integrated
  • Include functions such as engineering,
    purchasing, and order entry for product families
    which have routine activities prior to scheduling
  • Place the process boxes between the customer and
    the scheduling function
  • Minimize the data collection to the basics of
    cycle time or quality, and document the impact on
    leadtime

20
FAQ Administrative Mapping Part 2 Separate
Maps
  • Better for redesigning overhead and
    administrative support areas touching value
    streams
  • Order processing
  • Warranty activities
  • Job quotes
  • Not useful for activities outside a value stream
  • Data boxes must have attributes focusing on cost,
    quality, and service
  • Inventory is typically paperwork
  • Information flow is typically informal
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Value Stream Mapping TraintheTrainer

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Value Stream Mapping. Train-the-Trainer. Information For A Process Data Box ... FIFO lanes) control production between points of flow without a written schedule. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Value Stream Mapping TraintheTrainer


1
Value Stream Mapping Train-the-Trainer
2
Information For A Process Data Box(to be
collected on the shop floor)
  • Cycle time
  • Changeover time
  • Process reliability (uptime)
  • Scrap/Rework/Defect rate
  • Number of product variations
  • Number of operators
  • Production batch sizes
  • Working time (minus breaks)
  • Pack size

3
Typical Steps to Complete a Current State Drawing
  • Document customer information
  • Complete a quick walk through to identify the
    main processes (i.e., how many process boxes)
  • Fill in data boxes, draw inventory triangles, and
    count inventory
  • Document supplier information
  • Establish information flow how does each process
    know what to make next?
  • Identify where material is being pushed
  • Quantify production leadtime vs. processing time

4
Frequently Asked Questions Make to Order and
Engineer to Order Shops
  • Many shops have a combination of repetitive and
    non-repetitive products (indicating product
    families)
  • Product families might be difficult to see
    focus on machines/operations and work content
    time
  • Engineering might be included in the information
    flow for leadtime impact, etc.
  • Pitch is typically arbitrary to the manager
  • Employment of pitch requires detailed knowledge
    of work content and routings for jobs

5
FAQ Distribution Centers Example
(Information flow on top)
I
I
I
I
I
6
FAQ Parallel Manufacturing Flows
  • Keep it simple, and make sure to leave room for
    the data boxes!

7
FAQ Including Subassemblies
  • Focus on major subassemblies first
  • Select one or two which might represent different
    types of situations
  • Generic vs. specific to the product family
  • Outsourced tasks within assembly
  • Follow the format for parallel flow, and always
    include the main assembly process!
  • For large fabricating and assembly operations,
    consider maps for each major subassembly with a
    macro map indicating the entire product family

8
FAQ Do We Really Have a Supermarket (or FIFO
lane)?
  • Supermarkets (and FIFO lanes) control production
    between points of flow without a written
    schedule.
  • What is the trigger for production in this area
    of the value stream?
  • Is the upstream process overproducing?
  • If there is a scheduling system present outside
    of a pure pull, chances are that there is no
    supermarket.

9
FAQ Outsourcing
3 Days
2 days
.7 days
60 min.
10
FAQ Long Processing Times vs. Production
Leadtimes
8 hours
3 days
1 day
8 hours
11
FAQ Cycle Times vs. Work Content
  • Work content is important to understand costs and
    in balancing flow
  • Consider all machine and manual work content,
    regardless of the cycle time
  • Accumulate all parallel operations in the
    processing timeline

Cycle Time 30 sec Work Content ? 150 sec.
5
12
FAQ Different Changeover Cycle Times, etc.
  • Current state mapping might uncover
  • Several different machines performing the same
    operation
  • Different products within the family with
    different data box characteristics for a specific
    process
  • Capture the range of values as opposed to an
    average value

13
FAQ Mapping Final Inspection/ Repair/Rework
  • Judgment counts!
  • Minimal repair/rework might be captured as a data
    attribute at the final step.
  • If nearly every part needs assessment or extra
    work, consider a separate process box.

14
FAQ Supplier Data Boxes
  • Data attributes are dependent on the value stream
    and supplier. Minimum information might include

L/T 3 weeks
Batch 3 Tons
Min. Batch 2T
2 Scrap
15
FAQ Pull Within an MRP Environment
  • A combination push and pull is usually just a
    push system!
  • Multiple production triggers typically lead to
    overproduction.

16
FAQ Assemble-to-Order Options in a Future State
  • Finished goods supermarkets can be expensive in
    value streams which have many finished part
    numbers within a product family
  • To minimize inventory costs, try to find the
    upstream location where the value stream has very
    few variations and consider a supermarket of WIP
    at that point.
  • Customers orders can drop to this location,
    with FIFO lanes controlling production into
    shipping.

17
FAQ Assemble-to-Order Options in a Future State
Customer Orders
OXOX
18
FAQ Why Not Just Start Pulling Tomorrow?
  • Initiating a pull system without first attempting
    to flow will result in lots of supermarkets, and
    may increase your inventory levels.
  • Design your future state with the following
    sequence
  • Flow wherever you can (while still pushing)
  • Produce to the TAKT (while still pushing)
  • Implement a pull system

19
FAQ Administrative Mapping Part 1 Integrated
  • Include functions such as engineering,
    purchasing, and order entry for product families
    which have routine activities prior to scheduling
  • Place the process boxes between the customer and
    the scheduling function
  • Minimize the data collection to the basics of
    cycle time or quality, and document the impact on
    leadtime

20
FAQ Administrative Mapping Part 2 Separate
Maps
  • Better for redesigning overhead and
    administrative support areas touching value
    streams
  • Order processing
  • Warranty activities
  • Job quotes
  • Not useful for activities outside a value stream
  • Data boxes must have attributes focusing on cost,
    quality, and service
  • Inventory is typically paperwork
  • Information flow is typically informal
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