Learning in the 21st Century The 21st Century Classroom - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Learning in the 21st Century The 21st Century Classroom PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 19d291-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Learning in the 21st Century The 21st Century Classroom

Description:

VIDEO CLIP We Didn't Start the Fire. Background to the Past. Background to the Future ... Percentage of middle school students that have on-line friends from other ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:102
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 66
Provided by: wor80
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Learning in the 21st Century The 21st Century Classroom


1
Learning in the 21st Century The 21st Century
Classroom
  • Worthington Schools 2020
  • Creating Tomorrow for ALL Students
  • 2008-2009

2
VIDEO CLIP We Didnt Start the Fire
3
  • Background to the Past
  • Background to the Future
  • Background to the 21st Century Movement
  • Profile of a 21st Century Learner
  • Vision for 21st Century Learning
  • Worthington Response to 21st Century Learning
  • __________________________________
  • The 21st Century Classroom

4
  • BACKGROUND TO THE PAST

5
  • We always overestimate the change that will
    occur in the next two years and underestimate the
    change that will occur in the next ten.
  • Bill Gates, Business at The Speed of Thought
  • (Viking, 1999)

6
(No Transcript)
7
(No Transcript)
8
(No Transcript)
9
(No Transcript)
10
(No Transcript)
11
(No Transcript)
12
VIDEO CLIP Education Today and Tomorrow
13
  • WE WERE REALLY GOOD AT PREPARING STUDENTS FOR . .
    .

14
(No Transcript)
15
(No Transcript)
16
(No Transcript)
17
(No Transcript)
18
(No Transcript)
19
  • BACKGROUND TO THE FUTURE

20
(No Transcript)
21
(No Transcript)
22
(No Transcript)
23
(No Transcript)
24
VIDEO CLIP
  • TEAM LEARNING (Edutopia)

25
  • WILL WE BE GOOD AT PREPARING STUDENTS FOR . . .

26
(No Transcript)
27
(No Transcript)
28
(No Transcript)
29
(No Transcript)
30
(No Transcript)
31
Conclusions
  • Society is changing
  • The skills and knowledge required for work and
    civic life in the 21st century are shifting
  • Educational systems need to adapt to meet the
    needs of the digital natives in the 21st century

32
  • The 21st Century Classroom

33
(No Transcript)
34
The Partnership for 21st Century
Skills www.21stcenturyskills.org
35
21st Century Learning Sample DISTRICT Vision
  • The intention of the Worthington Schools is to
    transform education for all students by creating
    a more rigorous and globally competitive
    educational system. All Worthington students will
    meet or exceed state and national education
    standards. The Worthington Schools will prepare
    students for higher learning and the world of
    work through the programs, services, and
    offerings of a thorough, efficient, safe, and
    nurturing education system. The Worthington
    schools will (1) ensure all students master the
    essential curriculum and beyond (2) close the
    achievement gap among subgroups of the student
    population and (3) develop competence in 21st
    century content, learning skills, and tools.

36
Digital Natives
  • What is the learning profile of 21st Century
    students?

37
  • Students 1 request regarding technology use at
    their schools
  • Relax school rules about e-mail, IM, cell phone,
    and on-line use
  • Favorite communications device (K-12)
  • Cell phone (73 in grades 9-12 use a cell phone
    daily)
  • Percentage of middle school students that have
    on-line friends from other schools, states, or
    countries
  • 54

38
(No Transcript)
39
(No Transcript)
40
  • Digital natives . . .
  • Are used to receiving information really fast
  • Like to parallel process and multi-task
  • Prefer graphics before their text
  • Prefer random access (like hypertext)
  • Function best when networked
  • Thrive on instant gratification and frequent
    rewards
  • Prefer games to serious work

41
(No Transcript)
42
What Are They Missing?
43
THE CONNECTED CLASSROOM Website
  • http//www.cbsd.org/holicong/jendorman/

44
20th CENTURY EDUCATION VS. 21st CENTURY EDUCATION
45
Learning for a Creative Age
  • Society
  • Complex
  • Unpredictable
  • Network based
  • Changing rapidly
  • Horizontally integrated
  • Open
  • Information rich
  • Out of control
  • Learning Institutions
  • Hierarchical
  • Standardized
  • Information sparse
  • Bureaucratic pace
  • Vertically integrated
  • Based on knowledge transmission
  • Centralized control
  • Custodial

46
(No Transcript)
47
(No Transcript)
48
Yesterday and Today Where Weve Been and Where
We Are Going Curriculum
  • What is taught
  • Chapters covered and workbooks completed
  • Academic context
  • Textbook as resource
  • Individual subjects
  • Basics emphasized for all thinking skills
    emphasized for gifted
  • What is learned
  • Identification of what student should know and be
    able to do
  • Life context
  • Multiple resources
  • Integrated subjects
  • Basics and thinking skills emphasized for all

49
Yesterday and Today Where Weve Been and Where
We Are Going Instruction
  • Teacher centered
  • Organized around time
  • Single teaching strategy
  • Teach once
  • Fixed groups
  • Whole group instruction
  • Passive learning
  • Learner centered
  • Organized for results
  • Multiple teaching strategies
  • Reteaching and enrichment
  • Flexible groups
  • Differentiated instruction
  • Active learning

50
Yesterday and Today Where Weve Been and Where
We Are Going Assessment
  • Bell curve
  • One opportunity
  • After Instruction
  • Paper and pencil based
  • Grades average
  • Proving and accountability
  • Focus on product
  • Public and precise criteria
  • Multiple opportunities
  • Integrated with instruction
  • Performance based
  • Standard met or not met
  • Diagnose and prescribe
  • Focus on product and process

51
Digital Society Alters the Roles and Mechanisms
of Teaching and Learning
52
Designing a 21st Century Classroom
  • Curriculum Design
  • Project-based Learning
  • Problem-based Learning
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Integrated

53
  • Thematic
  • Research-oriented unit design
  • Service Learning projects
  • Standards - aligning to and exceeding State and
    National standards
  • Technologies and Multimedia - utilize these 21st
    century tools as vehicles to implement your
    curriculum

54
  • Multiple Literacies needed for living and
    learning in the 21st century
  • Classroom Strategies to develop Self-Directed,
    Independent and Interdependent Student Learning
  • Global Classroom - use the Internet to create
    collaborative projects and conduct authentic
    research, nationally and internationally
  • Student Motivation utilize these strategies to
    ensure that your students are engaged with the
    curriculum
  • Classroom Organization and Management -
    structures to support the 21st century classroom

55
  • Addressing Diversity and Social Issues the
    Isms - Racism, Classism, Sexism, anti-Semitism
    and religious oppression, Linguicism, Ableism,
    Ageism
  • Media Literacies introduction to use of multiple
    forms of media to motivate students, implement
    the curriculum and for assessment as students
    learn Media Analysis, Media Critique and Media
    Production skills!
  • Multiple Intelligences
  • Differentiated Instruction

56
  • Media Literacy - accessing, analyzing, critiquing
    and creating products in a variety of media.
  • Classroom Climate
  • Physical Environment
  • High Expectations
  • Emotional Climate

57
  • Cooperative and Collaborative Grouping
  • Parental and Community Involvement - authentic
    involvement, truly contributing to the curriculum
    and instruction the learning process -  not the
    "please come to the school and run off these
    papers for me, or shelve these books, or cut out
    these items."  True, highly motivated and
    valuable participation.
  • Themes - what kind of themes you can select, and
    how to incorporate everything, taking learning to
    greater levels.

58
What Could a Future Curriculum Look Like?
  • Learning would be structured mainly through
    projects. Some projects would be individual,
    while many would be group based.
  • Problems and goals would not be completely
    predefined by the curriculum. Students would
    repeatedly practice identifying and solving
    problems, rather than having them placed before
    them.

59
  • Learning would take place in a range of contexts
    and use a range of methods. Projects would not
    all be research based or within a traditional
    classroom environment. Students would be involved
    in doing as much as in thinking or knowing.

60
  • Alongside more traditional, teacher-centered
    assessment, students work would be evaluated by
    field experts, peers, and parents. It would be
    evaluated for different kinds of skills and
    knowledge interpersonal, thinking strategies,
    self-organization, and depth of understanding.

61
  • Thinking and self-assessment would be embedded
    across the curriculum. Students would focus
    particularly on learning to make connections
    between different contexts the transfer and
    application of knowledge across different
    domains.
  • Skills would be revisited and practiced over
    time, so that knowledge gained earlier in an
    educational career could be applied creatively to
    new problems.

62
  • Students would gain depth of understanding in a
    number of disciplines, or domains of knowledge,
    including traditional academic subjects. They
    would also learn explicitly how to combine
    interdisciplinary knowledge in completing a
    project goal.

63
  • If all the curriculum documents in the world were
    destroyed, what would be important for students
    to learn?

64
The Challenge for Public Education
  • We must transform all formal institutions of
    learning, from Prep through to Year 12, to ensure
    that we are preparing students for their future,
    not for our past. Schools that ignore the trends
    shaping tomorrow will cease to be relevant in the
    lives of their students and will disappear
    quickly.
  • - Michael Phillips, Principal
  • Ringwood Secondary School

65
VIDEO CLIP Pay Attention
About PowerShow.com