Scientific Literacy, Science Centres, and PISA 2006 Assessment - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Scientific Literacy, Science Centres, and PISA 2006 Assessment PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 15e5b5-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Scientific Literacy, Science Centres, and PISA 2006 Assessment

Description:

... and the changes made to it through human activity.' ( OECD 2003) ... form and function (cell, skeleton...) human biology. physiological change. biodiversity ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:20
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 31
Provided by: joens
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Scientific Literacy, Science Centres, and PISA 2006 Assessment


1
Scientific Literacy, Science Centres, and PISA
2006 Assessment
  • Kari Sormunen
  • Senior lecturer, PhDDepartment of Applied
    EducationUniversity of Joensuu

2
Content
  • Background
  • OECD/PISA Assessment
  • Roles of Science Centres
  • Pupils as epistemologists
  • PISA and Interactive Science Centres
  • Conclusions

3
Background of the presentation
  • Scientific Literacy my own research on pupils
    epistemological thinking related to science
    education epistemic views ? nature of science ?
    scientific literacy
  • Science Centres ecsite conference hosted by
    Heureka
  • PISA Assessment Finnish pupils success in 2000
    2003 What about 2006?

4
OECD/PISA Assessment
  • In 2006 scientific literacy is the major domain
    in PISA survey (including, e.g., affective
    components)
  • PISA 2000 2/3 reading literacy
  • PISA 2003 2/3 mathematical literacy
  • PISA 2006 2/3 scientific literacy
  • Large scale international comparative studies
    have been accepted as very relevant by policy
    makers, but the studies have not been discussed
    in the science education community (e.g.
    researchers)
  • Towards OECD standards on reading, mathematics
    and science ?!

5
Scientific literacy
  • Scientific literacy is the capacity to use
    scientific knowledge, to identify questions, and
    to draw evidence-based conclusions in order to
    understand and help make decisions about the
    natural world and the changes made to it through
    human activity. (OECD 2003)  
  • scientific literacy is a concept that escapes
    any attempt of a clear and universally accepted
    definition (Olsen 2004) 

6
Three dimensions of scientific literacy
  • processes the mental processes that are involved
    in addressing a question or issue (e.g.,
    identifying evidence or explaining conclusions)
  • content the scientific knowledge and conceptual
    understanding that are required in using these
    processes
  • context situations in which the processes and
    understanding are applied

7
Scientific processes
  • describing, explaining and predicting scientific
    phenomena
  • understanding scientific investigation
  • interpreting scientific evidence and conclusions

8
Major contents in PISA
  • structure and properties of matter
  • atmospheric change
  • chemical and physical changes
  • energy transformations
  • forces and movement

9
  • form and function (cell, skeleton...)
  • human biology
  • physiological change
  • biodiversity
  • genetic control
  • ecosystems
  • the Earth and its place in the universe
  • geographical change
  • ? maybe more items in 2006

10
Areas of contexts
  • Science in life and health
  • health, disease and nutrition
  • maintenance of and sustainable use of species
  • interdependence of physical/biological systems

11
  • Science in Earth and environment
  • pollution
  • production and loss of soil
  • weather and climate
  • Science in technology
  • biotechnology
  • use of materials and waste disposal
  • use of energy
  • transportation
  • ? maybe more areas in 2006

12
Behind the Finnish success?
  • curriculum vs. success to understand
    scientific process is emphasised in the Finnish
    curriculum in science education (?)
  • open tasks vs. success the Finns are good in
    reading writing (?)

13
Roles of Science Centres
  • as knowledge resources
  • as places for informal learning
  • as places for interaction
  • as contributors on cognitive, emotional and STS
    levels

14
Sources for scientific information
  • school books texts, pictures, tables, graphs,
  • media TV, newspapers,
  • Internet
  • home parents, relatives
  • everyday life...
  • science centres, museums...
  • ...

15
Features of informal learning in science
  • voluntary (or not)
  • often unstructured, unsequenced
  • non-assessed, non-certificated
  • open-ended
  • learner-led, learner-centred
  • outside of formal settings
  • many unintended outcomes (difficult to measure)
  • social aspect central, e.g. social interactions
    between visitors

16
Classification of informal sources of learning
INTENTIONAL SOURCES
e.g., learning whilst browsing a book / net
e.g., visiting a science centre
DELIBERATE ENCOUNTERS
ACCIDENTAL ENCOUNTERS
e.g., learning about AIDS from watching Bold
Beautiful
e.g., a purposeful visit to a childrens
playground
UNINTENTIONAL SOURCES
17
Features of interactive science centres
  • 3 Is Innovation, Interaction,
  • Involvement
  • exploring stations
  • exhibitions
  • guides / pilots / explainers
  • interactive, hands-on learning
  • play and enjoyment
  • ? affections

18
Contribution of interactive science centres (ISCs)
  • ISCs contribute indirectly to higher-order
    knowledge and understanding
  • Affective domain development of interest,
    enthusiasm, motivation, eagerness to learn,
    awareness and general openness and alertness
  • ISCs relate science and technology to everyday
    life - STS

19
Pupils as epistemologists
  • Pupils are facing
  • everyday knowledge
  • school science
  • scientific knowledge
  • Pupils are living with epistemic authorities
  • teachers, textbooks, media, scientists,...

20
Even 7th-graders are able to epistemic
considerations
  • Their own knowing and knowledge
  • they are aware of different sources of knowledge
  • but they are uncertain of their own knowing and
    knowledge
  • Pupils saw that their teachers knowledge
  • is academic in its nature
  • is sure in many cases (NN wouldnt teach us
    things that are not true or sure...)
  • ? teachers as treasurers of knowledge (?)

21
  • Pupils views about scientists knowing and
    knowledge
  • based on research, experiments, modelling,...
  • scientists are not absolutely sure
  • (there are always some doubts)

22
Pupils generalised views
  • Pupils themselves ? laymen / novices
  • Teachers ? (absolute) epistemic authorities
  • Scientists ? elaborators
  • ? Pupils are able to understand the nature of
    science on quite high level

23
(No Transcript)
24
Epistemic demands in science education
  • In science education, those who present
    scientific activities and knowledge often fail to
    adequately introduce the nature of science to
    pupils.
  • Instead, it is implicitly presented and
    understood, which might be one reason for this
    failure. This problem needs to be explicated and
    conceptualised.

25
  • The concept epistemic demand is such an
    enterprise it means the difference concerning
    the understandings of scientific activities and
    knowledge between an instructor (or recourses,
    media,) and a learner.

26
Epistemic demands in formal / informal science
education
Nature of science (process knowledge)
Resources, media
Curriculum
Instructional approach
Instructor
Learner
27
PISA 2006 and ISCs
  • There will be the affective component
  • Should ISC-visits and their meaning be studied?
  • By that there would be interesting data both for
    educators and ISCs
  • Could ecsite be active on triggering some
    questions or statements (to contact PISA/OECD
    authorities)?
  • Situation with ISCs and their neighbour schools
    vs. rural / distant schools?
  • ? towards VIRTUAL ISCs?

28
ISCs epistemic role
  • ISCs offer non-formal environments cf. schools
    are formal with formal epistemic authorities
  • ISCs are nearer to real science than schools
    which are purely academic science environments
  • ISC guides might not be seen so absolute
    authorities than teachers (?)

29
  • Are ISCs (organisers of exhibitions and
    activities, and guides) aware of aspects of
    scientific literacy?
  • Epistemic demands related to the nature of
    science and ISCs?

30
Conclusions ISCs and PISA
  • ISCs action share a lot with the aims of
    scientific literacy required by PISA assessment
    ? ISCs awareness of SL (?)
  • Epistemic advantages of ISCs compared with school
    science (?)
  • Epistemic demands related to ISCs (?)
  • PISA 2006 includes also affective components ?
    ISCs meaning (?)
About PowerShow.com