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Managing Change using Appreciative Inquiry

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Describe Appreciative Inquiry' as an approach. Apply ... Journaling. Approaches within Action Research. Co-operative inquiry. Collaborative approach ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Managing Change using Appreciative Inquiry


1
Managing Change using Appreciative Inquiry
  • Lynda Clark
  • Box Hill Centre Manager
  • Royal District Nursing Service
  • December 2004

2
Session Outcomes
  • Explain the Action Research cycle
  • Identify approaches within Action Research
  • Describe Appreciative Inquiry as an approach
  • Apply Appreciative Inquiry to your own
    situation
  • Enjoy Appreciative Inquiry as an inspired
    change management approach

3
The Action Research Cycle
  • Action research
  • pursuing action and research, … a cyclic
    process, alternating action with critical
    reflection … (and is) also qualitative and
    participative (Dick, 1997)
  • Collaborative problem-solving relationship
    between researcher and client which aims at both
    solving a problem and generating new knowledge
    (Coghlan and Brannick (2001, p.3)

 
4
Data generation
  • Engagement with others
  • Active involvement in the day-to-day
    organisational processes relating to the action
    research project
  • Both formal and informal observations
  • Journaling

5
Approaches within Action Research
  • Co-operative inquiry
  • Collaborative approach
  • Participatory action research
  • Action inquiry

6
Appreciative Inquiry
  • Focuses on the best of what is
  • To realise the ideal of what might be
  • With the consent of what should be
  • For the reality of what can be
  • (Cooperrider and Srivastva, 1987)

7
Appreciative Inquiry Model
  • Traditional Old Process
  • Define the problem
  • Fix whats broken
  • Focus on decay
  • What problems are you having?
  • Appreciative Inquiry
  • Search for solutions that already exist
  • Amplify what is working
  • Focus on life giving forces
  • What is working well around here?

(Hammond, 1998)
8
Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry
  • In every society, organisation or group something
    works
  • What we focus on becomes our reality
  • Reality is created in the moment and there are
    multiple realities
  • The act of asking questions of an organisation or
    group influences the group in some way

9
Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry (2)
  • People have more confidence and comfort to
    journey to the future (the unknown) when they
    carry forward parts of the past (the known)
  • If we carry parts of the past forward, they
    should be what is best about the past
  • It is important to value differences
  • The language we use creates our reality

(Hammond, 1998)
10
Appreciative Inquiry The 4-D Cycle
Discovery What gives life? (The best of what
is) Appreciating
Destiny How to empower, learn, and
adjust/improvise? Sustaining
Dream What might be? (What is the world calling
for? Envisioning
Affirmative Topic Choice
Design What should be-the ideal? Co-constructing
Cooperrider, Whitney Stavros,2003
11
Discovery
  • What interests or excites you about being here?
  • What results are you hoping for?
  • Tell me about a time when you thought --- was at
    its best.
  • Tell the story of what was going on, who was
    involved, and what happened
  • What did you do? What did you value most about
    your involvement in that story?
  • What do you value most about the contribution of
    others in that story?

12
Discovery ? Dream
  • Facilitates dialogue among participants
  • Sharing of positive stories
  • Creates energy and enthusiasm
  • Brings out the positive core of the organisation
  • Begin to see common themes

13
Dream ? Design
  • Underpinned by palliative care philosophy
  • Solid foundations
  • Communication
  • Shared goals
  • Seamless service
  • Responsive
  • Appropriate levels of funding
  • Develop relationships with client and family
  • Multi-disciplinary team
  • (RDNS/EPC Action Research project 2004)

14
Design Phase
  • Create the social-technical architecture
  • Craft provocative proposition(s)
  • Dream becomes a reality

15
Good provocative proposition
  • Bridge the best of what is and what might be
  • Challenge the status quo
  • It should be desirable
  • State it in the affirmative and bold terms
  • Fit within the architecture
  • Zone of proximal development (ZPD)
  • Participative process
  • Balance the management of continuity, novelty and
    transition

16
Design element 1
  • Theme Partnership
  • RDNS/EPC partnership is based on solid
    foundations of shared goals, underpinned by the
    palliative care philosophy of care and
    appropriate levels of funding, to provide a
    responsive, seamless service enabling therapeutic
    relationships with client and family within a
    multidisciplinary team.
  • (RDNS/EPC Action Research project 2004)

17
Destiny what will be?
  • Allow yourself to dream and you will discover
    that destiny is
  • yours to design
  • (Dr J. Stavros)

18
Action plan what next?
  • What can we do - together?
  • What will we do to contribute?
  • How will we do it to provide optimal client
    care outcomes?

19
Good luck
  • Have a go using appreciative inquiry

20
References
  • Action Research
  • Coghlan, D. and Brannick, T. (2001), Doing action
    research in your own organisation, Sage
    Publications Ltd., London.
  • Dick, B. 1997, What is action research?
    Occasional pieces in action research methodology,
    2. Available online at http//www.scu.edu.au/scho
    ols/ar/arm/op002.html
  • Appreciative Inquiry
  • Cooperrider D, Whitney D Stavros J 2003,
    Appreciative Inquiry the first in a series of AI
    workbooks for leaders of change, Lakeshore
    Communications Inc., Bedford Heights, OH.
  • Cooperrider, D. and Srivastva, S. 1987,
    Appreciative inquiry in organisational life,
    Research in Organisational Change and
    Development, Vol. 1., 1987, pp 129-169
  • Hammond, S. and Hall, J. (1998), What is
    appreciative inquiry? In S. Hammond C. Royal
    (eds.), Lessons from the Field Applying
    Appreciative Inquiry, Thin Book Publishing Co.,
    Plano, TX. www.thinbook.com
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