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The History of Japanese Tattooing SelfMade Monsters

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How have the symbolism and meaning of tattoos changed in Japan? ... These tattoos were much more limited in size and elaboration ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The History of Japanese Tattooing SelfMade Monsters


1
The History of Japanese TattooingSelf-Made
Monsters
  • Lauren Crocker

2
Tattooing has a long history in Japan
  • What are some of the traditional symbols that
    have been used?
  • How have the symbolism and meaning of tattoos
    changed in Japan?
  • What purposes has tattooing served in Japan?

3
(No Transcript)
4
Brief History
  • Irezumi- Japanese word, refers to the insertion
    of ink under the skin to leave a permanent,
    usually decorative mark a form of tattooing
  • People who inhabited the peripherals of Japan
  • Ainu people
  • Tattooed faces and arms
  • Okinawan people
  • Tattooed hands and feet
  • For people in mainland Japan
  • Used for punishment for heinous crimes

5
Brief History
  • Mainland Japan
  • Brand slaves and
  • Distinguish groups of outcast people
  • These tattoos were much more limited in size and
    elaboration
  • Tattooing as a punishment abolished in 1870

6
Traditional Symbols
  • Kanji symbols
  • Folk heroes
  • Religious figures
  • Stylized background
  • Wind and wave designs
  • Extremely colorful designs
  • Dragons, fish, gods, flowers etc.

7
Tattoos Changed
  • In full glory- covers entire back and adjoining
    parts
  • Main character with smaller figures on arms or
    legs
  • More limited Western-style- wan-pointo
  • Covers smaller areas

8
(No Transcript)
9
Purposes of Tattooing
  • To punish criminals
  • Words like dog or pig
  • Geishas used Classical Irezumi tattooing- enhance
    their beauty
  • Traditionally cover the entire body
  • Enthusiasts have their own art galleries
  • Japanese fascination- has a perverse, erotic and
    sado-masochistic aspect

10
Alternative Beliefs and Practices
  • Position and size indicated differences of rank
  • 3rd century
  • Nihonshoki- punishment
  • Signs of barbarianism and savagery
  • As a response to Nihonshoki
  • There was a rise of subcultural code of
    resistance
  • Used to symbolize the Deviant other
  • Signify an association with certain groups
  • Gang affiliation- Yakuza

11
Alternative Beliefs and Practices
  • Today
  • no other style can compare in colure, form,
    motion or light and shade of background
  • Among young people there is an association with
    play but,
  • Tattoos are often obscured from view
  • Only viewed during special occasions
  • Associated with play, which may include club
    culture

12
The importance of time, place and culture
  • Irezumi- greatest period was in the 17th and 18th
    centuries
  • In the 19th century- associated with lower
    classes
  • Japanese tattoos are detailed, depicting symbols
    and meaning but,
  • Tattoos are often obscured from view in Japan
  • People with tattoos are often barred from public
    bathhouses

13
References
  • Facts
  • Atkinson, Michael. (2003, August). Tattooed The
    Sociogenesis of a Body Art. University of Toranto
    Press. Retrieved October 13, 2008, from
    http//books.google.com/books?idBUxKHJAUSxgCpg
    PP1dqtattooedsigACfU3U23a oeNVfkown3Lk0st5G7Tf
    wbg9g
  • Favazza, Armando R. (1996, May). Bodies Under
    Siege Self-Mutilation and Body Modification in
    Culture and Psychiatry. Johns Hopkins University
    Press. Retrieved October 13, 2008, from
    http//books.google.com/books?idBwQT9fdZNdgCprin
    tsecfrontco verdqbodiesunderseigesigACfU3U0
    Kb5pcTMJMSEBYBTtMwJNtvQpsw
  • Hendry, Joy and Massimo, Raveri. (2005, April).
    Japan at Play. Routledge. Retrieved October 13,
    2008, from http//books.google.com/books?idEWc4d
    Qjh- HUCprintsecfrontcoverdqjapanatplaysig
    ACfU3U3D_TVbel U9RAzxMJHs-6uQVn3goA
  • Irezumi. (n.d.). Retrieved October 13, 2008,
    from http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irezumi
  • Kenner, T.A. (2006,September). Symbols And Their
    Hidden Meanings. Retrieved October 13, 2008,
    from http//books.google.com/books?idI8P2sZPHEOE
    Cprintsecfrontcoverdqsy mbolsandtheirhidden
    meaningssigACfU3U20a8_5ql4dKHpmHfRizwqeW RK_SA
  • Sanders, Clinton. (1990, May). Customizing the
    Body The Art and Culture of Tattooing. Temple
    University Press. Retrieved October 13, 2008,
    from http//books.google.com/books?id5umuEQz- RA
    MCprintsecfrontcoverdqcustomizingthebodysig
    ACfU3U2CIc_wrA BT_XkL827X1NpMuY3qZg
  • Pictures
  • http//www.tattoosymbol.com/upload/images/kanji_pe
    rserverance.jpg
  • http//search.barnesandnoble.com/Tattooed/Michael-
    Atkinson/e/9780802085689/?itm4
  • http//images.google.com/imgres?imgurlhttp//bp1.
    blogger.com/_GsGfS9uLmSI/RxetDdIb9xI/AAAAAAAAAIg/7
    LJE-w2nZbM/s400/irezumi4.jpgimgrefurlhttp//muhs
    ashum.blogspot.com/2007_10_01_archive.htmlh300w
    400sz45hlenstart4usg__077A2wffcEaIQKQJrq7
    HVFm7XP0tbnid3asnDW6WyYdctMtbnh93tbnw124p
    rev/images3Fq3Direzumi26gbv3D226hl3Den
  • http//www.tattoosymbol.com/upload/images/kanji_pe
    rserverance.jpg
  • http//www.virtualginza.com/gif/yakuza1.jpg

14
Quiz
  • 1) What is the Japanese word referring to a form
    of tattooing?
  • (A) Ainu
  • (B) Irezumi
  • (C) Okinawan
  • 2) Name two common Japanese symbols used in
    tattooing.

15
Quiz
  • 3) Mainland Japan originally used tattooing for?
    (name one)
  • 4) The greatest period for Irezumi was in the?
  • 5) During the 19th century, tattoos were
    associated with which social status?

16
Answers
  • 1) (B)
  • 2) Possible Kanji, Folk heroes, Religious
    figures, Wind and wave designs, Dragons, fish,
    gods, flowers
  • 3) Punishment, branding slaves or distinguishing
    outcasts
  • 4) 17th and 18th centuries
  • 5) Lower-class
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