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Capturing Kids Hearts 2000. Generic Special Education Grades (PK-12) 1999 ... Unlocking hearts to unlock minds. Learning requires discipline. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Presented by Susan Brooks


1
Dispelling The MythLockhart Junior High School
Presented by Susan Brooks Linda
Bertram Jeffrey Knickerbocker Andrea
Lopez Bonnie Salome Robert
Anchondo Susan Schroeder
Lockhart Junior High School
2
Overview
  • Introduction Susan Brooks
  • Motivation Linda Bertram
  • Math Jeffrey Knickerbocker
  • Writing Andrea Lopez
  • Language Arts Bonnie Salome
  • ESL Robert Anchondo
  • Special Education Susan Schroeder

Lockhart Junior High School
3
Susan Brooks, Principal
  • Education Master of Arts Texas State University
  • Experience 37 years as Texas Educator
  • Superintendent
    Curriculum Director
  • Assistant Superintendent
    Elementary and Secondary Principal
  • Secondary Teacher - History, Theatre Arts, Speech
    Communication
  • Philosophy Student Data Driven, Results Based.
  • No excuses. Successful Results from students and
    teachers.
  • All students will learn and learn well, if given
    the appropriate classroom/school setting.
  • To capture the minds of students, we must first
    capture their hearts it is then that their
    learning takes flight, and they will rise to our
    high expectations.

susan.brooks_at_lockhart.txed.net
Lockhart Junior High School
4
Closing the Gap LJHS Success Plan
100 Success, Every Child, Every Time
Lockhart Junior High School
5
WE SOLVE CHALLENGES BY ASKING OURSELVES
WHAT DO WE WANT? WHAT WILL BE THE END
RESULTWHAT DO WE KNOW? WHAT DOES THE
LATEST/BEST RESEARCH TELL USWHAT DO WE BELIEVE?
WHAT DO OUR BELIEF SYSTEMS TELL US ABOUT
STUDENTSWHAT DO WE DO? WHAT ACTION WILL WE
TAKE TO ACHIEVE THE END RESULT
Lockhart Junior High School
6
WE BELIEVE
THAT ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN AND LEARN WELL IF
GIVEN A PROPER LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. THAT ALL
TEACHERS CAN TEACH AND TEACH WELL IF GIVEN A
PROPER TEACHING ENVIRONMENT.
THAT A PROPER LEARNING AND TEACHING ENVIRONMENT
IS SAFE, CALM, AND CARING. THERE IS LAUGHTER,
THERE IS FUN, THERE IS HARD WORK AND HIGH
EXPECTATIONS, THERE IS CELEBRATION WHEN GOALS ARE
ACHIEVED. FAILURE IS NOT PERCEIVED AS AN OPTION.
STUDENTS SHOULD BE IN COMPETITION WITH WHAT IS
TO BE LEARNED, NOT OTHER STUDENTS. STUDENTS AND
TEACHERS MUST STAND AND DELIVER EVERYDAY.
Lockhart Junior High School
7
WE KNOW ALL STUDENTS WILL LEARN AND LEARN WELL
1. IF THEY BELIEVE THEIR TEACHERS REALLY
CARE ABOUT THEM AS INDIVIDUALS2. IF THEY
UNDERSTAND WHAT IT IS TEACHERS WANT THEM TO
LEARN3. IF THEY KNOW THE PREREQUISITE SKILLS
NEEDED4. IF THEY ARE GIVEN ENOUGH TIME TO
LEARN5. IF THEY FEEL SAFE6. IF THEY UNDERSTAND
WHY THEIR TEACHERS WANT THEM TO LEARN
Lockhart Junior High School
8
WE KNOW ALL STUDENTS WILL LEARN AND LEARN WELL
CONT
TEACH WHAT YOU TEST, TEST WHAT YOU
TEACH.AVERAGE HUMAN LEARNING REQUIRES AT LEAST
SEVEN REPETITIONS FOR SHORT TERM
LEARNING.HANDS ON LEARNING IS BY FAR THE MOST
EFFECTIVE WAY FOR MOST HUMANS TO LEARN. TEACHER
GUIDED PRACTICE IS ALWAYS NEEDED BEFORE STUDENTS
CAN MASTER NEW LEARNING.RATE OF LEARNING IS
DIRECTLY RELATED TOTHE CLIMATE IN WHICH THE
LEARNING TAKES PLACE.HUMANS DO NOT LEARN AT
THE SAME RATE OFSPEED, THE TEACHER MUST PROVIDE
TIME FOR ALL STUDENTS TO LEARN.
Lockhart Junior High School
9
WE KNOW ALL STUDENTS WILL LEARN AND LEARN WELL
CONT
STUDENTS KNOW WHEN THEY FAIL TO LEARN THEY DO
NOT NEED TO BE TOLD. ALWAYS TELL STUDENTS WHAT
THEY DID RIGHT BEFORE YOU DISCUSS WHAT THEY DID
WRONG.NEVER, NEVER, GIVE UP, KEEP TEACHING, AND
USE ALL LEARNING MODALITIES. ALWAYS, TELL THEM,
SHOW THEM, AND HAVE THEM BECOME PHYSICALLY
INVOLVED IN THE LEARNING.HUMANS, NO MATTER HOW
OLD THEY ARE, LIKE TO BE REWARDED, REWARD
LEARNING.TELL STUDENTS EVERYDAY WHAT IT IS THEY
ARE GOING TO LEARN AND WHY.
Lockhart Junior High School
10
WE KNOW ALL STUDENTS WILL LEARN AND LEARN WELL
CONT
MEET YOUR STUDENTS AT THE DOOR AND SPEAK TO THEM
AS THEY ENTER YOUR CLASSROOM EVERYDAY, YOU WILL
GET BETTER LEARNING RESULTS. EXPECT THE BEST
FROM YOUR STUDENTS AND YOU WILL GET THE BEST.DO
NOT ACCEPT SLOPPY OR INCORRECT WORK FROM YOUR
STUDENTS, IF YOU START OUT ACCEPTING IT, THAT IS
ALL YOU WILL EVER GET.THIS IS JUNIOR HIGH,
NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, GIVE UP.
Lockhart Junior High School
11
THIS IS WHO WE ARE
Student Information
Lockhart Junior High School
12
THIS IS WHO WE ARE
Teacher Information
Lockhart Junior High School
13
Racial/Ethnic Composition of Students
Lockhart Junior High School
14
KEYS TO MOTIVATE ALL STUDENTS
15
Linda Bertram
  • Grade Level Principal, Lockhart Junior High
  • Principal Certification Grades (EC-12) 2005
  • Masters in Education 2004
  • Professional Development and Appraisal System
    (PDAS) 2004
  • Instructional Leadership Development (ILD) 2004
  • Probationary Principal Certification Grades
    (EC-12) 2003
  • Cognitive Coaching 2002
  • Texas Beginner Educator Support System (TxBESS)
    Mentor of Mentors 2001
  • Capturing Kids Hearts 2000
  • Generic Special Education Grades (PK-12) 1999
  • Bachelor Of Social Work, U.T. Austin 1994

  • linda.bertram_at_lockhart.txed.net

16
Goals and Objectives
  • Identify Key Culture and Climate Issues that
    Influence Student Motivation
  • How Rules, Procedures, and Rituals Benefit
    Students
  • How Classroom Relationships Improve Student
    Motivation
  • General Guidelines to Motivate Students

17
KEYS TO STUDENT DISCIPLINE
  • Unlocking hearts to unlock minds
  • Learning requires discipline. Educators can
    impose discipline upon students, or they can use
    strategies that help students form
    self-discipline.
  • All actions by educators related to discipline
    will fall into one of three categories. These
    are proactive measures, reactive measures and
    interventions.

18
Capturing Kids Hearts
  • Building perceptions of capability or success
  • Building perceptions of importance or
    significance
  • Building the perception of empowerment by
    allowing students to make decisions and
    experience the consequences
  • Building an environment of consistency
  • Building mutually respectful relationships

19
Success as a Motivator
  • Success in school is not only
  • a strong deterrent to
  • improper behavior,
  • it is also
  • a key to student motivation

20
Importance
  • All students have a need to feel they have a
    meaningful role in some area of the school
    culture and a belief that important persons in
    the school community care about them.
  • Students need to feel a sense of belonging.

21
Consistency
  • Students are creatures of habit and react
    positively to routines in the classroom.
  • Teachers establish a routine for the class period
  • Greeting students at the door
  • Make eye contact with all students
  • Bell to bell instruction
  • Role check
  • Daily objectives on the board
  • Classroom rules and expectations along with
    consequences posted
  • Follow Madeline Hunter lesson design
  • Use higher level questioning strategies
  • All students are expected to stand and deliver
    everyday
  • Follow campus and district code of conduct for
    students without exception
  • Attend to discipline matters before they escalate
  • Deal with facts
  • Stay emotionally neutral

22
Respect
  • Respect is a universal need of all humans.
  • Every adult must treat all students with respect
    at all times.
  • Every student must treat all adults with respect
    at all times.
  • Students who do not respect teachers will not
    learn teachers who do not respect students will
    not unlock their hearts and therefore will fail
    to unlock their minds.
  • The key to earning a students respect is
    preserving his or her dignity.

23
Functions and Impact of Culture
  • Culture builds commitment identification of
    staff, students, and administrators.
  • Culture amplifies the energy, motivation
    vitality of a school staff, students community.
  • Culture increases the focus of daily behavior
    attention on what is important and valued.

24
A Framework for Analyzing School Culture
  • Rules, Rewards,
  • Sanctions

Shared Values Beliefs
Rites Rituals
Physical Environment
Communication Network
25
Goal for School Culture
  • All settings to be Safe and Productive
  • A Positive Climate
  • Highly Motivated Staff and Students
  • A Spirit of Collaboration and Problem-solving

26
Teachers as Motivators
  • Personality Traits of Good Motivators
  • Charisma- the ephemeral quality of
  • personality that attracts and inspires.
  • Caring- refers to the teachers willingness to
    work on behalf of the students.
  • Enthusiasm- is contagious, as is a lack of it.
  • Remember, it must be genuine.

27
Teachers as Motivators Cont
  • Trust- is when a student can count on their
    teacher for support and guidance. They can also
    be comfortable to make choices and mistakes
    without harm or reprisal.
  • Respect- relates closely to trust, and
  • should be mutual.

28
Strong Foundations Through Relationships
  • Learn students name
  • Greet students as they enter your classroom
  • Dont be afraid to tell students about
    yourselfoutside interests
  • Regularly engage students in team-building
    activities
  • Teach to a variety of learning styles

29
Keystone
  • Learning communities thrive when classroom
    management is effective.
  • School leaders need to recognize that
    teacher-student relationships are the keystone
    for classroom management and positive school-wide
    culture.
  • Many behavior problems ultimately boil down to a
    break down in teacher-student relationships.

30
Motivation
  • Sass(1998) asked his classes to recall two recent
    class periods, one in which they were highly
    motivated and one in which their motivation was
    low. In over 20 courses, Sass reported, the same
    eight characteristics emerged as major
    contributors to student motivation

31
  • Instructors enthusiasm
  • Relevance of the material
  • Organization of the course
  • Appropriate difficulty level of the material
  • Active involvement of students
  • Variety
  • Rapport between teacher and students
  • Use of appropriate and understandable examples

32
General Strategies for Motivating Students
  • Hold High Expectations for students
  • Capitalize on students existing needs
  • Make students active participants in learning
  • Help Students Set Goals
  • Inform students on what it takes to be successful
    in your class
  • Vary your teaching methods

33
General Strategies for Motivating Students Cont
  • Offer student choice when possible
  • Strengthen students self-motivation Value
    student input
  • Be enthusiastic about your subject
  • Give student feedback as soon as possible
  • Reward Success
  • Share proficient work
  • Be specific in feedback
  • Ask students to journal about learning
    experiences--Reflect

34
BOTTOM LINE
  • Create a Culture that Emphasizes Responsibility
    for Learning
  • Create a Classroom designed for SuccessRules,
    Procedures, Routines
  • Form Positive Relationships through Caring
  • Differentiate Instruction to meet the needs of
    your students

35
MOTIVATION THE KEY THAT WILL UNLOCK THE DOOR TO
LEARNING!100 SuccessEvery ChildEvery Time.
36
RESOURCES
  • Building Classroom Relations. Educational
    Leadership. ASCD. September 2003. Vol.61. No.1
    www.ascd.org
  • KEYS Document. Lockhart ISD. http//www.lockhartis
    d.org/admin/KEYS.pdf
  • Neely, E. (1997) Presentation
  • Sass, E.J. (1989) Motivation in the college
    classroom what students tell us. Teaching of
    Psychology, 16(2), 86-88.

37
Jeff Knickerbocker8th Grade MathLockhart Junior
HighLockhart, TX
  • BS, Geophysics, University of Delaware
  • MS, Geophysics, University of Washington
  • TX Teacher Certification Math 6-12
  • Alternate Certification Program, ESC XIII,
    Austin, TX
  • jeffrey.knickerbocker_at_lockhart.txed.net

38
My name is Jeff and this is my classroom
39
Texas Math Teacher Survival Guide
Written for teachers by a teacher
40
My scores are bad what should I do?
  • Step 1 Accept that it is your job to help
  • at-risk kids succeed in the
  • high-stakes testing culture,
  • whether you agree with it or not.

41
Step 2
  • Get a list of objectives the student is expected
    to master
  • This is published by the state testing agency.
  • This is your curriculum.
  • Your math textbooks no longer existput them all
    in storage.

42
Step 3
  • Break down objectives.
  • Break the state curriculum down into small
    pieces.
  • Each piece covers only one skill, which is one
    lesson.
  • If a piece will take more than 5 minutes to
    explain, you need to break it into even smaller
    pieces.

43
Step 4
  • Write your tests and quizzes
  • Use released tests, study guides and workbooks to
    write questions.
  • Give preference to materials published by the
    state testing agencymost materials published by
    outsiders are worthless.
  • Your questions should mimic in both style and
    substance questions that have appeared on the
    test in the past.

44
Step 5
  • Test your students weeklyand teach to each
    weekly test!
  • Your weekly tests all reflect the material that
    will be on the big test at the end of the year.
  • Each week, teach the material that is on that
    weeks test. Teach it the way it will be tested.

45
Step 6
  • Intervene!
  • When a student fails a test or when their average
    dips below passing, that is a signal to intervene
    immediately...dont wait!
  • Work with that student one-on-one or in a small
    group.
  • When you intervene with a student, prepare a
    practice testthis is a copy of that weeks
    test with the numbers changed.

46
Dont Panic!
  • I expect every student to pass the state test at
    the end of the year.
  • Once I started teaching
  • the curriculum the way
  • it was going to be tested,
  • I was amazed at how
  • quickly scores improved!

47
Writing
  • How Does it Happen for All?

48
ABOUT ME
  • B.A. History, Southwestern University
  • M.A. Latin American Studies, UCSD
  • M.Ed. Curriculum Instruction, Texas State
  • Certified in English Language Arts and Reading,
    Social Studies, and Speech
  • Experience
  • Teaching Assistant for three years at university
    level
  • Third year teacher at Lockhart Junior High School
  • andrea.lopez_at_lockhart.txed.net

49
HOW DOES IT HAPPEN FOR ALL?
  • OBSTACLES TO OVERCOME
  • An unfamiliar, SCARY process.
  • WHAT DO WE DO?
  • Small, concrete tasks
  • ANALYTICALLY BREAKING the process into pieces.

50
WE ARE ALL AUTHORS.
  • OBSTACLE TO OVERCOME
  • I have nothing to write about!
  • WHAT DO WE DO?
  • Dont panic. Choose key words and list five.

Options Experience
51
TAKING THE FIRST STEP
  • OBSTACLE TO OVERCOME
  • How do I start writing?
  • WHAT DO WE DO?
  • Provide think time, but hover.

52
THE BASICS
  • OBSTACLE TO OVERCOME
  • Poor spelling, grammar, mechanics.
  • Stuck on ideas.
  • WHAT DO WE DO?
  • Peer editing

53
FULL CIRCLE
  • OBSTACLE TO OVERCOME
  • How do I put the pieces together?
  • WHAT DO WE DO?
  • Individual student conferences.

54
AUTHORS SHARE THEIR WORK
  • Final Presentation
  • Accountability for Student
  • Reinforce KEY IDEA All students have something
    to say that is worth listening to.

Publishing
55
RESULT
Students ACTIVELY LISTEN to their peers.
Students ENJOY SHARING their WRITTEN WORK.
56
In closing
We are all AUTHORS.
57
Bonnie Salome, 8th grade Language Arts Teacher
  • Graduated from Southwest Texas State University
    in 1995 B.A. in English
  • 12 years teaching at Lockhart Junior High

bonnie.salome_at_lockhart.txed.net
58
  • Making Kids Fall in Love With Learning
  • Capture their hearts
  • Captivate their imaginations
  • Cultivate joy for reading

59
  • Capturing Hearts
  • The theme is the message or insight the story
    gives the reader about life or humanity. It is
    the heart of the story.
  • The readers are humans.
  • Find a way to connect their experiences with the
    events and characters in literature.
  • Allow students the opportunity to relate to a
    work of literature.
  • Share your own humanity with your students.

60
  • Captivating Their Imaginations
  • Read aloud in class together.
  • Model good reading for your students.
  • Stimulate their senses and help them create
    mental pictures of a text.
  • Teach and model reading strategies.

61
BED AND BREAKFAST. BED AND BREAKFAST. Each
word was like a large black eye staring at him
through the glass, holding him, compelling him,
forcing him to stay
-from The Landlady by Roald Dahl
62
I tryed hard but I still couldnt find the
picturs I only saw the inkI told him it was a
very nice ink blot with littel points all around
the egesit was a raw shok. He said people see
things in the ink.
-from Flowers for Algernon
63
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64
Teach Students to Dialogue with the Text
65
Make Predictions
  • Look at the cover, art, title, genre, and
    headings.
  • Look at the graphs, charts, lengths, print size,
    inside flaps and back cover.
  • During reading, make a prediction by saying, I
    think such and such will happen.

66
Ask Questions What does this word/sentence
mean? What is happening in this
paragraph? Why does a character react this
way?
67
Make Comments
  • I like
  • I dont like
  • This part is interesting
  • This doesnt seem like a good decision

68
Make Connections This reminds me of This
story is like This character makes me think
about
69
Use audio recordings of the text listen to the
authors words and sentences in order to grasp
the true meaning of the work. Voice, then, comes
from within the writer Listening to the writers
words enables the reader to transcend his own
reality and enter that of the author. If that
reality is a childhood adventure, a painful
memory, a happy event, the reader becomes part of
the happening, the adventure. - Voices Tapping
the Childs Voice by Pamela E. Watkins
70
  • Use movie clips and music to
  • Exemplify literary devices, such as mood,
    flashback, foreshadowing, symbolism, and
    figurative language.
  • Illustrate the elements of a story, such as
    characterization, conflict, and problem
    resolution.
  • Compare and contrast story variants.

71
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74
They All Make It!
75
Robert L. Anchondo
  • 7th year at Lockhart Junior High School
  • English as a Second Language (ESL) Teacher for
    6-8 grade
  • Language Arts, Social Studies, and Mathematics
    Rescue Teacher
  • Spanish Oral Reading Coach for UIL
  • Adult ESL Teacher
  • Sustained Professional Development
  • Retired Military Officer
  • robert.anchondo_at_lockhart.txed.net

76
Students Stand and Deliver
  • Create safe and secure environment
  • Lower anxiety in classroom
  • Build a community of learners
  • Emphasis on reading and writing
  • Acceptance at any time of
    the day for help in content
    areas
  • Teacher collaboration

77
1. Create a Safe and Secure Environment
78
2. Lower Anxiety in the Classroom
79
3. Build a Community of Learners
80
4. Emphasize Reading and Writing
81
5. Acceptance at any Time of the Day for Help
in Content Areas
82
6. Teacher Collaboration
83
In Conclusion
  • Do not undervalue strengths and enthusiasm of
    students
  • validate their experiences and offer support.

84
ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN. in their own time in
their own way!
  • Presenter
  • Susan Schroeder
  • LIFE Class Special Education Teacher
  • Lockhart Jr. High
  • susan.schroeder_at_lockhart.txed.net

85
Susan Schroeder
  • Special Education Teacher in the LIFE class at
    Lockhart Jr. High (self-contained setting)
  • 19th year in education --- all 19 years in the
    LIFE class at LJH
  • B.B.A in Business Marketing from Texas AM
    University in 1983 M.Ed. in Special Education
    from SWTSU in 1993.
  • Teaching students with special needs is my
    passion.

86
Who are the LIFE Class Students?
  • Classified as students with significant cognitive
    disabilities and speech, language, and social
    challenges.
  • Known at our school as children that are
    important and have significance within the school
    community.
  • Learning objectives include access to
    grade-level curriculum, functional academics,
    social skills, community skills and prevocational
    skills.

87
100 SuccessEvery Child.Every Time
  • Why are the LIFE class students
  • successful at Lockhart Jr. High?
  • We focus on the positive skills that these
    special children have and build on those skills
    to move them forward academically, functionally,
    and socially.
  • We believe that every student deserves to reach
    their full potential.
  • We NEVER, NEVER GIVE UP, no matter what!

88
Its a COLLABORATIVE Effort!
  • I use the word we because it is a collaborative
  • effort between the teacher, paraprofessionals,
  • speech language pathologist, occupational
  • therapist, physical therapist, vision support,
    regular
  • education teachers for curriculum support, and
    the
  • administrators.
  • We work together in the best interest of each
    child.

89
How do we help the LIFE class students become
high achievers?
  • We focus on these areas
  • Behavior Management
  • Motivation
  • Instruction
  • Assessment

90
Behavior ManagementWe take a proactive approach
to behavior management by
  • providing a structured, picture-supported
    learning environment, including scheduled
    transitions and common routines, while being
    flexible enough to do whatever is needed to take
    advantage of teachable moments

91
  • maintaining consistent student behavior
    expectations and enforcing specialized behavior
    management systems tailored to the individual
    student
  • using a visual system of rewards and
    consequences to hold students accountable for
    their behavior choices

92
  • keeping parents informed daily using a
    communication book, additional communication via
    e-mail and phone, and giving the parents
    permission to contact me anytime they have
    questions or concerns about their child

93
MotivationOur students are motivated because we
  • let them know that they are important and
    significant to us and to the whole school
    community
  • give them some control over their environment by
    providing choices, teaching them about choices,
    and holding them accountable for their choices
  • take time to get to know them and what motivates
    them, no matter how bizarre the motivators are

94
  • acknowledge all genuine success, no matter how
    small it might seem to others
  • use a What are you working for? strategy,
    paired with receiving circles on their work
    chart and a visual and predictable behavior
    management system
  • make connections between concepts taught and
    real-life examples and experiences to enhance the
    purpose for learning and to help with
    generalization of skills to other environments.

95
Instruction
  • Our instructional approach is based on proven
    methods
  • Mastery Learning
  • Madeline Hunter Lesson Design
  • STAR Questioning
  • But that is not enough!

96
We also have to use
  • research-based best practices for special
    needs populations, with a commitment to using
    what works-whatever it takes
  • day-to-day assessment of progress, using
    checklists, data sheets, and written data sheets
    tailored to the individual student

97
  • multi-sensory delivery of material, with a heavy
    emphasis on visual supports

98
  • integration of technology, such as augmentative
    and alternative communication devices, single and
    multi-level switches, and computers to facilitate
    participation in learning and to complement the
    curriculum

99
  • generalization of skills to other environment by
    taking our students on community trips 3-4 times
    per month

100
How do the LIFE class students demonstrate
understanding when pencil/paper tasks are not an
option?
  • activation of an assistive technology device
  • use of pictures/objects
  • use of communication symbols
  • eye gaze
  • touching, pointing, gesturing, sign
  • typing responses using picture/ symbol and word
    prediction software
  • visual scanning
  • 2 switch scanning
  • any other way we can think of !

101
How is this student showing success at school?
She is accessing the curriculum using single
switch, while in a physical therapy position with
visual schedule support .
She is using two switches to step scan through a
power point and select topics she wants to tell
others about.
She is participating in a reading activity that
is projected onto a screen, using a single
switch, asking her classmates whats next? to
go to the next page.
She is participating in a cooking activity with
her classmates using a single switch to operate
the blender.
102
State AssessmentThe LIFE class students are
  • Assessed using TAKS-Alt, to meet the Federal NCLB
    guidelines
  • Accessed using alternate standards on grade-level
    curriculum through essence statements and
    prerequisite skills.
  • Accountable in the AYP calculations for the
    2007-2008 school year
  • How is this being done at Lockhart Jr. High?
  • teacher collaborates with the regular education
    content teachers to find out how they are
    teaching specific objectives
  • teacher researches curriculum content, TAKS
    learning guides, and teaches the required content
  • teacher designs TAKS-Alt testing activities,
    containing 3 pre-determined criteria per
    activity, that use modified delivery and response
    methods to demonstrate knowledge
  • teacher follows state guidelines for testing
    procedures, data collection, data input,
    scoring, and reporting

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Lockhart Junior High School
107
Thank You!
500 City Line Road Lockhart, Texas 78644 Phone
512-398-0770 Fax 512-398-0072 ljhs_at_lockhart.txed.
net
Lockhart Junior High School
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