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Sitcoms

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Title: Sitcoms


1
Sitcoms
2
Sitcom Map of America
3
Sitcoms Highest number of episodes
  • Murphy Brown 247 (1988-1998)
  • Friends 236 (1994-2004)
  • Leave It To Beaver 234 (1957-1963)
  • Drew Carey 233 (1995-2004)
  • The Real McCoys 224 (1957-1963)
  • King of the Hill 222 (1997-present)
  • Roseanne 220 (1988-1997)
  • Family Matters 215 (1989-1998)
  • All In The Family 210 (1971-1979)
  • Everybody Loves Raymond 210 (1996-2005)
  • One Day At A Time 209 (1975-1984)
  • The Facts of Life 209 (1979-1988)
  • The King of Queens 207 (1998-2007)
  • Father Knows Best 203 (1954-1962)
  • Alice 201 (1976-1985)
  • Ozzie and Harriett 435 (1952-1966)
  • The Simpsons 428 (1989-present)
  • My Three Sons 380 (1960-1972)
  • Make Room For Daddy 336 (1953-1964)
  • George Burns/Gracie Allen) 291 (1950-1958)
  • Cheers 275 (1982-1993)
  • Beverly Hillbillies 274 (1962-1971)
  • Donna Reed 274 (1958-1966)
  • Frasier 264 (1993-2004)
  • Married With Children 259 (1987-1997)
  • Happy Days 255 (1974-1984)
  • Bewitched 254 (1964-1972)
  • The Jeffersons 253 (1975-1985)
  • MASH 251 (1972-1983)
  • Andy Griffith Show 249 (1960-1968)

http//www.angelfire.com/trek/proutsy/
4
Longest Running by Seasons
  • 20 The Simpsons (Fall 2008)
  • 14 (The Adventures Of) Ozzie And Harriet
  • 13 King Of The Hill (Fall 2008)
  • 12 My Three Sons, South Park (Fall 2008)
  • 11 MASH, Cheers, The Danny Thomas Show / Make
    Room For Daddy, Happy Days, The Jeffersons,
    Married ... With Children, Frasier
  • 10 Murphy Brown, Mystery Science Theater 3000,
    Friends
  • 9 The Beverly Hillbillies, The Love Boat, Alice,
    Roseanne, Family Matters, Coach, All In The
    Family, One Day At A Time, Night Court, The Drew
    Carey Show, Everybody Loves Raymond, The King Of
    Queens

5
The Early Days
6
Pre-Seventies Sitcoms
7
  • 1940s
  • The Aldrich Family (19491953)
  • 1950s
  • The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet
    (19521966)
  • Amos Andy (19511953)
  • Beulah (19501953)
  • The Bob Cummings Show (19551959)
  • The Donna Reed Show (19581960)
  • The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
    (19501958)
  • The Honeymooners (19551956)
  • I Love Lucy (19511957)
  • I Married Joan (19521955)
  • Leave It to Beaver (19571963)
  • Make Room For Daddy (19531965)
  • The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis
    (19591963)

8
Fifties
  • I. THE FAMILY
  • Examples "Father Knows Best" The Adventures of
    Ozzie and Harriet" "Leave it to Beaver"
  • SUBURBAN, MIDDLE CLASS, TRADITIONAL, IDEAL,
    CONSUMERS, PERFECT PARENTS
  • DAD Fatherly talks, dispenser of wisdom, always
    around, maybe a little bumbling
  • MOM Housekeeper, supports husband as bread
    winner, nicely dressed, in the kitchen
  • KIDS Loveable scamps, minor problems, ready to
    learn lessons from DAD
  • TRICKSTER Anti-authoritarian, individualistic,
    trouble maker (always put in his place)
  • II. FAMILY TWISTS Examples "Bachelor Father"
    "The Real McCoys"
  • UNCLES AND AUNTS RAISING KIDS THE DOMESTICATION
    OF THE PLAYBOY
  • III. ALTERNATIVE FAMILY
  • "Make Room for Daddy" "The Honeymooners" "Youll
    Never Get Rich"
  • URBAN LAMPOONS OF FAMILY LIFE, THE MILITARY, SHOW
    BUSINESS
  • DAD Quarrelsome, ambitious, scheming (Ralph
    Kramden)
  • MOM Fights back (Alice, Danny Thomas wife)
  • KIDS Bratty and difficult (if they exist at
    all)

9
The Sixties
10
  • 1960s Magicoms
  • The Addams Family (19621966)
  • The Andy Griffith Show (19601968)
  • The Beverly Hillbillies (19621971)
  • Bewitched (19641972)
  • The Bob Newhart Show (19611962)
  • The Brady Bunch (19691974)
  • The Dick van Dyke Show (19611966)
  • The Flintstones (1960-1966)
  • The Flying Nun (19671970)
  • Get Smart (19651970)
  • Gilligan's Island (19641967)
  • Hogan's Heroes (19651971)
  • I Dream of Jeannie (19651970)
  • Mister Ed (19611966)
  • The Monkees (19661968)
  • The Munsters (19641966)
  • My Favorite Martian (19631966)

11
Sixties
  • I. FAMILY/DOMESTIC COMEDIES (continue from the
    1950s, with some changes)
  • The Donna Reed Show ("Mother Knows Best")
  • The Dick Van Dyke Show (the "new" American
    family young, ambitious, Kennedy-esque,
    progressive, smart, sexy)
  • The Nelsons the Cleavers (shift to focus on
    Ricky and Wally, the teens in the family)
  • The Patty Duke Show (teen issues with some
    idealism, but convention rules)
  • Dobie Gillis
  • II. TWISTS ON THE TRADITIONAL FAMILY
  • Family Affair (uncle and Butler)
  • Bachelor Father (widower raising teen daughter)
  • My Three Sons (widower and cook raising three
    boys)
  • III. WORK PLACE FAMILIES
  • Dick Van Dyke Show (show business)
  • Car 54 Where Are You (police station)
  • Get Smart (spy spoof)

12
Sixties
  • IV. MILITARY SETTING
  • Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C (contemporary Marine boot
    camp)
  • Hogan's Heroes (WW II prisoner of war camp)
    McCale's Navy (WW II, the Pacific)
  • F- Troop (Indian wars, ca. 1880)
  • V. Hayseed Comedies ("Fish out of water")
  • The Andy Griffith Show
  • Beverly Hillbillies (pits rural innocence and
    honesty against "big city" corporate greed,
    hypocrisy, and snobbery)
  • Green Acres (reverses "Hillbillies" with city
    coming to the country and trying to cope)
  • Petticoat Junction (Hooters in Hooterville!)
  • VI. Magi-coms (fantasy-escape comedies, bizarre
    characters situations, but more commentary on
    contemporary issues than other more "realistic"
    comedies.)
  • Mr. Ed (how to raise a teenager who eats hay)
  • My Favorite Martian (tolerance for an uncle from
    another planet)
  • Bewitched (women have power but domesticity is
    best acceptance of difference)
  • I Dream of Jeannie (women have power- in your
    dreams! domesticated sex slave)
  • The Munsters (questions what is normal tolerance
    of differences)
  • The Addams Family (ultimate comment on the
    domestic conventionality of 50s family comedies.

13
The Seventies
14
  • 1970s
  • All in the Family (19711979)
  • Archie Bunker's Place (19791983)
  • The Bob Newhart Show (19721978)
  • Chico and the Man (19741978)
  • Diff'rent Strokes (19781986)
  • WKRP in Cincinnati (19781982)
  • MASH (1972-1983)
  • Mork Mindy (19781982)
  • Taxi (19781983)
  • Three's Company (19771984)
  • What's Happening!! (19761979)
  • Laverne Shirley (19761983)
  • Welcome Back, Kotter (19751979)
  • The Jeffersons (19751985)
  • Good Times (19741979)
  • Happy Days (19741984)
  • Sanford and Son (1972- 1977)

15
Seventies
  • REACTION TO THE HAYSEED/MAGICOMS OF THE SIXTIES.
    SHIFT TO
  • URBAN SETTINGS
  • BLUE COLLAR FAMILIES
  • "WORK PLACE" FAMILIES
  • TOPICAL ISSUES
  • OLD SIT-COM FORMULA IS ABANDONED. NO
    PREDICTABLE RESOLUTIONS OF MINOR PROBLEMS.
    CHARACTERS OFTEN HAVE NO ANSWERS AND REMAIN AS
    CONFUSED AND ANXIOUS AS THE TIMES WERE.

16
Seventies
  • I. "HIP FAMILIES" AND TEENS
  • GIDGET
  • BRADY BUNCH
  • PARTRIDGE FAMILY
  • II. WORK PLACE COMEDIES
  • MARY TYLER MOORE (Working Girl,
    independent, etc.)
  • TAXI (Blue collar work place
    "family")
  • BOB NEWHART SHOW (Home life, in city
    apartment office setting Psychiatrist)
  • MASH (Military setting, anti-war
    themes, "male" bonding
  • WKRP in Cincinnati (Radio station)
  • Welcome Back Kotter (school)

17
Seventies
  • III. THE "NEW" FAMILY Norman Lear - Fragmented,
    angry, in conflict, yelling, etc. often about
    social issues. Urban not suburban, generational
    battles, polarized about the issues (no safe
    resolutions)
  • All in the Family
  • Sanford and Son (junkyard setting)
  • Chico and the Man (garage setting)
  • IV. Nostalgia
  • Happy Days
  • V. Postmodern Magicom
  • Mork and Mindy

18
Seventies - MTM
  • Emphasis on workplace parafamilies, and singles.
    Often had high production values.
  • The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970-77), CBS
  • Rhoda (1974-78), CBS
  • Phyllis (1975-77), CBS
  • Lou Grant (1977-82), CBS
  • The Betty White Show (1977-78), CBS
  • The Bob Newhart Show (1972-78), CBS
  • WKRP in Cincinnati (1978-82), CBS
  • Hill Street Blues (1981-87), NBC
  • Remington Steele (1982-87), NBC
  • St. Elsewhere (1982-88), NBC
  • Newhart (1982-90), CBS
  • MTM alums
  • Taxi -- 1978-82
  • Cheers -- 1982-93
  • Influenced Taxi, Cheers, (Cheers earned 117 Emmy
    nominations, edged out by ER with 122 as of 2009
    for the most Emmy nominations for a single
    series), Wings, Frazier, Friends, Will Grace
    through James Burrows.

19
Seventies Norman Lear
  • All in the Family (19711979)
  • Sanford and Son (19721977)
  • Maude (19721978)
  • Good Times (19741979)
  • Diff'rent Strokes (19781986)
  • Archie Bunker's Place (19791983)
  • Gloria (19821983)
  • Production company
  • The Jeffersons (19751985)
  • Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman (19761978)
  • One Day at a Time (19751984)
  • The Facts of Life (19791988)
  • Silver Spoons (19821987)
  • Square Pegs (1982)
  • Who's the Boss? (19841992)

20
Seventies Gary Marshall
  • Love, American Style (69-74)
  • spunoff Happy Days, which spunoff
  • Laverne and Shirley, (76-83)
  • Mork and Mindy, (78-82)
  • Joanie Loves Chachi, (82-83)
  • Blansky's Beauties (77)
  • Out of the Blue (79)

21
The Eighties
22
  • 1980s
  • Newhart (19821990)
  • Cheers (19821993)
  • Family Ties (19821989)
  • Who's the Boss? (19841992)
  • The Cosby Show (19841992)
  • Night Court (19841992)
  • The Golden Girls (19851992)
  • ALF (19861990)
  • Garry Shandling Show (19861990)
  • Full House (19871995)
  • Married... with Children (19871997)
  • The Wonder Years (19881993)
  • Murphy Brown (19881998)
  • Roseanne (19881997)
  • The Simpsons (1989-)
  • Doogie Howser, M.D. (19891993)
  • Major Dad (19891993)

23
Eighties
  • I. Rise of the Postmodern Comedy
  • Seinfeld
  • Its Gary Shandlings Show
  • The Simpsons
  • II. More Parafamilies
  • Cheers
  • Newhart
  • Night Court
  • Murphy Brown
  • Doogie Howser, MD
  • III. Anarchic Comedies from Fox
  • Marriedwith Children
  • The Simpsons

24
Eighties
  • IV. REVISIONIST TRADITIONAL FAMILIES
  • Family Ties
  • Full House
  • Cosby Show (Ethnic)
  • Silver Spoons
  • The Wonder Years (Nostalgia)
  • Major Dad
  • ALF (Magicom)
  • V. WORKING CLASS FAMILIES
  • Roseanne
  • Grace Under Fire

NBCs Must-See TV Thursday Nights 1985 to late
90s Hill Street Blues, The Cosby Show, Family
Ties, Cheers, Night Court, L.A. Law, Frasier,
Seinfeld, ER, Friends, and Will Grace.
25
The Nineties
26
(No Transcript)
27
  • 1990s
  • The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (19901996)
  • Wings (1990-1997)
  • The Nanny (1993-1999)
  • Grace under Fire (1993-1998)
  • Sex and the City (1998-2004)
  • Friends (1994-2004)
  • The Jeff Foxworthy Show (1995-1997)
  • Spin City (1996-2002)
  • Sabrina the Teenage Witch (1996-2003)
  • Dharma Greg (1997-2002)
  • Will Grace (1998-2006)
  • Family Guy (1999-2002/2005-)
  • King of Queens (1998-2007)
  • South Park (1997-)

28
Nineties
  • Fragmentation of audience. More adult themes.
  • Dominance by NBC (Must-see Thursday)
  • I. TRADITIONAL FAMILIES
  • The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
  • The Nanny
  • Dharma Greg
  • II. WORKING CLASS FAMILIES
  • The Jeff Foxworthy Show
  • III. MAGICOMS
  • Sabrina the Teenage Witch

29
Nineties
  • IV. ANTI-COMS
  • Family Guy (1999-2000, 2002, 2005-)
  • South Park (1997-)
  • Futurama (1999-2003, 2008-?)
  • V. PARIFAMILIES
  • Wings (1990-1997)
  • Sex and the City (1998-2004)
  • Friends (1994-2004)
  • Spin City (1996-2002)
  • Will Grace (1998-2006)
  • Frasier (1993-2004)

30
The Millennium
31
  • 2000s
  • Malcolm In The Middle (2000-)
  • Scrubs (2001-2008)
  • Reba (2001-2007)
  • According to Jim (2001-2007)
  • 8 Simple Rules (2002-2005)
  • Two and a Half Men (2003-)
  • Arrested Development (2003-2006)
  • Joey (2004-2006)
  • American Dad! (2005-)
  • The War at Home (2005-2006)
  • How I Met Your Mother (2005-)
  • Entourage (2004-)
  • Weeds (2005-)
  • My Name is Earl (2005-)
  • Aliens in America (2007-)

32
Millennium
  • I. TRADITIONAL FAMILIES
  • Weeds
  • Malcolm In The Middle
  • According to Jim
  • 8 Simple Rules
  • Two and a Half Men
  • American Dad!
  • The War at Home
  • II. WORKING CLASS FAMILIES
  • Everybody Hates Chris
  • My Name is Earl
  • III. ANTI-COMS
  • Arrested Development
  • IV. Parafamilies
  • Entourage

33
Dramedies
  • Ally McBeal
  • Boston Legal
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer
  • Charmed
  • Dead Like Me
  • Desperate Housewives
  • Due South
  • Ed
  • Firefly
  • Freaks and Geeks
  • Gilmore Girls
  • Grey's Anatomy
  • Monk
  • Moonlighting
  • Northern Exposure
  • Pushing Daisies
  • Rescue Me
  • Six Feet Under
  • Sports Night

34
Women and Humor
35
(No Transcript)
36
Morals
  • Homer Save a guy's life, and what do you get?
    Nothing! Worse than nothing! Just a big scary
    rock.
  • Bart Hey, man, don't bad-mouth the head.
  • Marge Homer, it's the thought that counts. The
    moral of the story is a good deed is its own
    reward.
  • Bart Hey, we got a reward. The head is cool.
  • Marge Then... I guess the moral is no good deed
    goes unrewarded.
  • Homer Wait a minute. If I hadn't written that
    nasty letter, we wouldn't've gotten anything.
  • Marge Well... Then I guess the moral is the
    squeaky wheel gets the grease.
  • Lisa Perhaps there is no moral to this story.
  • Homer Exactly! Just a bunch of stuff that
    happened.
  • Marge But it certainly was a memorable few days.
  • Homer Amen to that! laughter all around
  • -- Simpsons, Blood Feud''

37
Plot Formulas
  • The plot and situations for many sitcom episodes
    arise out of a character's lying to or otherwise
    deceiving the other characters. The most common
    comedic situations based on deception include
  • Attempts to hide egregious mistakes or acts
    of weakness.
  • Attempts to protect friends and family
    members from bad news.
  • Attempts to "correct" a mistake before
    others find out about it.
  • Attempts to hide the breaking of pacts.
  • Attempts to maintain an advantage based on
    deception.
  • Attempts to dupe someone so as to achieve an
    advantage.
  • Attempts to return stolen property before
    discovery of the theft.
  • Attempts to replace destroyed property
    before discovery of destruction.
  • Attempts to ignore certain characters.
  • Attempts to recreate scenarios.
  • Attempts to fix situations that end up
    making them worse.
  • (wikipedia)

38
Formulas
  • Fish out of water Many sitcoms, despite a
    variety of settings, are based on the premise of
    a characters being out of his or her element, a
    fish out of water.
  • Foils Other sitcoms are based on foils. In
    fiction, a foil is a minor character whose traits
    are the opposite to those of the main character.
    This situation highlights the main characters
    traits just as a silver foil behind a ruby would
    highlight the rubys color. I Married Joan and I
    Love Lucy are examples. In both series, a
    straightforward, down-to-earth, rational husband
    marries a flighty, zany, emotional woman given to
    hatching complex absurd schemes that invariably
    cause problems for their impatient but long
    suffering husbands.
  • (wikipedia)

39
Formulas
  • Youthful protagonist's point of view
  • A third premise for sitcoms is that of telling
    the story from the youthful protagonists point
    of view (i. e., the use of an unreliable
    narrator). In these shows, the main characters
    are teens or pre-teens whose view of the world is
    often both exasperating and endearing
    simultaneously. Trying to understand their world
    through inexperienced and naïve eyes, these
    characters often misunderstand the implications
    of incidents and actions. Often, they make a bad
    situation worse before their parents or another
    wise, understanding, and loving adult bails them
    out of their trouble. As a result, they become a
    little older and a little wiser.
  • (wikipedia)

40
Formulas
  • Parody Television sitcoms such as Batman and Get
    Smart are based on parodying other more serious
    versions of their characters or genres. Batman,
    starring Adam West, poked fun at the campy
    elements implicit in costumed crime fighters and
    over-the-top villains whose comic book punches
    are accompanied by hand-lettered onomatopoeia in
    dynamic and dazzling fonts.
  • Ensemble cast structure Many sitcoms reuse a
    common mixture of character archetypes to achieve
    reliable comedic situations from week to week.
  • (wikipedia)

41
Formulas
  • The naïve fool The most common archetype
    appearing in sitcoms is the naïve fool.
    Typically, this character accepts events and
    statements at face value and often misunderstands
    situations in ways that create conflict in the
    plot. Some of the many characters in sitcom
    history that fit this description include Maynard
    G. Krebs (The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis), Monroe
    Ficus (Too Close for Comfort), Chrissy Snow
    (Three's Company), Rose Nylund (The Golden Girls)
    Woody Boyd (Cheers), and Linda (Becker).
  • The sage This character usually has either an
    elevated intellect, advanced age, or "outsider"
    experience. The sage frequently comments wryly on
    the situation into which the other characters
    have placed themselves. Often suggests solutions
    to resolve the major plot conflict. The character
    Wilson from Home Improvement is one example of a
    sage.
  • (wikipedia)

42
Formulas
  • The comic relief The comic relief character
    usually exhibits eccentric personality traits and
    unusual reactions to commonplace situations and
    sometimes serves as the protagonist of the
    situation comedy series. This character's strange
    attitudes and reactions to events provide
    opportunities for absurd or unexpected humour.
    Cosmo Kramer from Seinfeld is a textbook example
    of a comic relief character. On the American
    version of The Office, Dwight Schrute is the main
    comic relief character.
  • The antagonist This archetypal character
    functions as a primary rival, competitor, or
    enemy of the series' principal character, the
    protagonist. On the sitcom All in the Family,
    Michael "Meathad" Stivic served as the primary
    antagonist to his father-in-law, Archie Bunker.
    On The Simpsons, Homer Simpson chooses (most of
    the time) to make an antagonist of his neighbor,
    Ned Flanders. Jerry Seinfeld's main antagonist on
    his self-titled sitcom was his postal worker
    neighbor Newman.
  • (wikipedia)

43
Formulas
  • The ladies' man / the man eater The ladies' man
    and the man eater are aggressively sexual
    characters whose primary humor derives from their
    sexual exploits. Depending upon the tenor of the
    series, the character's attitude can range from
    harmless flirtation to borderline hypersexuality.
    The characters Larry Dallas (Three's Company),
    Blanche Devereaux (The Golden Girls), Roz Doyle
    (Frasier), The Todd (Scrubs), Joey Tribiani
    (Friends, Joey) and Glenn Quagmire (Family Guy)
    are examples of this character type.
  • The ethnic/regional stereotype Some sitcoms
    feature characters from other countries or
    specific parts of the United States whose
    accents, speech patterns, mannerisms, and
    attitudes provide opportunities for conflict or
    comic relief. Examples include Latka Gravas
    (Taxi), Carla Tortelli (Cheers), Thurston Howell
    III and Lovey Howell (Gilligan's Island), Fez
    (That '70s Show), Otto and Gretchen Mannkusser
    (Malcolm in the Middle), Lola Hernandez (Hot
    Properties), Carla Espinosa (Scrubs (TV Series)
    and Joy Darville (My Name Is Earl).
    (wikipedia)

44
  • Common characters
  • Other recurring archetypal characters that appear
    in sitcoms include
  • The meddling or nosy neighbor (The
    Ropers/Ralph Furley from Three's Company, The
    Ochmoneks from ALF)
  • The wacky wife and her straight laced
    husband (I Love Lucy, Dharma Greg)
  • The wisecracking curmudgeon (Archie Bunker
    from All in the Family, Lou Grant from The Mary
    Tyler Moore Show, Frank Barone from Everybody
    Loves Raymond)
  • The well-meaning, but ill-fated, male blue
    collar worker, usually married to a relatively
    better-looking and smarter woman (The
    Honeymooners, The Flintstones, The Simpsons, The
    King of Queens, Still Standing, Family Guy,
    According to Jim, Yes, Dear, Everybody Loves
    Raymond)
  • The lovable loser (Cliff Clavin and Norm
    Peterson from Cheers, Noel Shempsky from Frasier,
    Gunther from Friends, Spence Olchin from The King
    of Queens, Stan Zbornak from The Golden Girls).

45
  • Common characters
  • Other recurring archetypal characters that appear
    in sitcoms include
  • The acerbic servant (Geoffrey from The Fresh
    Prince of Bel-Air, Florence Johnston from The
    Jeffersons, Robert Guillaume's title character
    from Benson, Rosario Salazar from Will Grace)
  • The unseen character, often mentioned and
    sometimes heard, but never seen (Vera from
    Cheers, Maris from Frasier, Louis from Becker,
    Bob Sacamano from Seinfeld, Phil from The Golden
    Girls, Stanley from Will and Grace)
  • The cutesy moppet (Michelle Elizabeth
    Tanner, played by the Olsen twins, from Full
    House)
  • The overprotective father (Paul Hennessy
    from 8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage
    Daughter, Dave Gold from The War at Home, Danny
    Tanner from Full House, Flex from One On One,
    Uncle Phil from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Bill
    Cosby from The Cosby Show)
  • The meddling sibling (The Brady Bunch, Eight
    is Enough, Malcom in the Middle, Twins, DJ from
    Full House)
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