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Teaching Math

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Curriculum accommodations. Adapting the ... Accommodation (McNamara 1998) 8. Repeating a computational operation. ... Accommodation (Burgstahler 2003) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Teaching Math


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Teaching Math Science to Special Needs Students
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  • Presented by
  • Lisa SuttonPatricia Szewczyk

5
Agenda
  • What are exceptional learners?
  • Clarification of terms
  • Math Interventions
  • Science Interventions
  • Curriculum accommodations
  • Adapting the mainstream classroom
  • Wrap Up / Activity

6
Did you know..
  • Today over 6.5 million exceptional learners have
    been identified in public schools through-out
    the United States.
  • 1 out of 10 students in U.S. schools is
    considered exceptional.

7
What is the Exceptional Learner?
  • Theyre individuals who require special education
    related services if they are realize their full
    human potential.
  • They may have problems in thinking, seeing,
    hearing, speaking, socializing, or moving.
  • Mental Retardation
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Emotional or Behavior Disorders
  • Communication Disorders
  • Deaf and Hard of Hearing
  • Blindness or Hard of Hearing
  • Blindness or Low Vision
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders

8
Clarification of Terms
  • IDEA
  • Section 504
  • IEP
  • Least Restrictive Environment (LRE)
  • Self-contained Classroom
  • Mainstream Classroom
  • Inclusion and Full Inclusion

9
Children Ages 3-21 Served Under IDEA
http//nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/nativetrends/ShowTable
.asp
10
Characteristics of Math Barriers
  • Math facts
  • Word problems
  • Visual perceptual disabilities
  • Auditory perceptual disabilities
  • Attention problems- distractibility-
    impulsivity- hyperactivity

11
Model of Two Stimulating Quizzes
12
Math Intervention
  • Guessing or racing through answers
  • Difficultly in completing work
  • 3. Dysgraphia
  • Auditory memory
  • deficits

Difficulty
Accommodation
  • 1. Hold their pencil while the think
  • or encourage thinking time
  • 2. Limit the number of problems
  • 3. Writing should be kept at a
  • minimum
  • 4. Link visual presentations
  • with auditory

(McNamara 1998)
13
Math Intervention
  • 5. Erasing difficulties
  • 6. Difficulties distinguishing size, shapes,
    length, and/or amounts, heavy- light,
    bigger-smaller
  • 7. Visual memory problems

Difficulty
Accommodation
  • 5. Model how to erase
  • 6. Use real materials for
  • comparison. Use all
  • senses- touching, looking,
  • counting aloud. Have them
  • experience the concept.
  • 7. Use verbal prompts or
  • color cuing

(McNamara 1998)
14
Math Intervention
  • 8. Repeating a computational operation.
  • 9. Have problems with math facts
  • 10. Have problems with word problems

Difficulty
Accommodation
  • 8. Alternate operations are
  • Required so that a pattern is
  • not established.
  • 9. Use mnemonics- a memory
  • enhancing strategy and
  • graphic organizers
  • 10. Provide students with
  • success by building on prior
  • skills and using task analysis
  • to simplify the instructional
  • sequence of math skills.

(McNamara 1998)
15
Math System
  • TouchMath
  • TouchMath is a multi-sensory teaching approach
    that bridges manipulation and memorization.
  • Students interact with numbers on paper by
    seeing, saying, hearing and touching numbers as
    they arrive at the right answers without
    guessing.
  • Teaches counting, addition, subtraction,
    multiplication, division, story problems, time,
    money and fractions.

http//touchmath.com/
16
TouchMath Promotes
  • Use in special education with students that have
    mild to severe learning disabilities
  • Facilitates comprehension among students who have
    autistic spectrum disorders
  • Accelerated math comprehension among children as
    early as ages 4 to 5
  • Builds a firm foundation and
  • speed up learning in Kindergarten through
    3rd grade
  • Remediate learning problems in any regular
    grade-level classroom

http//touchmath.com/
17
Characteristics of Science Barriers
  • Memory recall
  • Visual processing
  • Auditory processing
  • Motor skills
  • Organizational Deficits
  • Attention Deficits
  • Generalization
  • Negative Attitudes
  • Social skills
  • Language Disorders

(Steele, 2004)
18
Science Intervention
  • 1. Reading text or graphics
  • 2. Seeing materials on blackboard
  • or overhead
  • Reading output from equipment
  • Hearing multimedia and videotaped presentations

Difficulty
Accommodation
  • Materials in large text or Braille, on tape or
    via computer and enlarge illustrations
  • Provide binoculars, verbalize content
  • Interface lab equipment with computer and provide
    large print and speech output
  • Provide printed materials, have an interpreter
    present, face student for lip reading

(Burgstahler 2003)
19
Science Intervention
  • 5. Participating in class discussions due to
    hearing or speech impairment
  • Understanding concepts due to a specific learning
    disability
  • Reading because of specific learning disability
  • 8. Taking notes in class because of mobility or
    visual impairment

Accommodation
Difficulty
  • 5. Portable computer with speech output
  • 6. Use visual, aural and tactile demonstrations
    incorporated into instruction
  • Give extra time and access to materials via
    computer equipped with speech and large print
    output
  • 8. Provide in-class access to a computer with
    adaptive technology

(Burgstahler 2003)
20
Science Intervention
  • Operating lab equipment and conducting lab
    experiments due to mobility impairment
  • 10. Completing an assignment or lab because of a
    health impairment
  • 11. Doing research

Difficulty
Accommodation
  • Have an accessible facility, adjustable-height
    tables, model lab partner, modified scientific
    equipment
  • Allow flexibility in schedule arrangements
  • 11. Have information accessible on computer with
    adaptive technology

(Burgstahler 2003)
21
Accommodations in Delivery of Instruction
  • Discussion instruction
  • Materials presented in a variety of ways
  • Projects themes
  • Breakdown the lesson
  • Limit the amount of knowledge to be mastered
  • Incorporating movement
  • Use technology
  • Assessments

22
Modifying the Classroom
  • Use an organizational check list system
  • Use mailbox bins
  • Desk location
  • Limit the amount of visual stimuli to prevent
    distraction
  • Use a token economy system

(Carbone 2001)
23
Classroom Model for Structural Intervention
Blackboard (removed of potential distracters)
door
PeerModel
PeerModel
Freeseat
Child w/ ADHD
X
PeerModel
PeerModel
X
X
X
Teachers Desk
Child w/ ADHD
PeerModel
X
X
X
PeerModel
Help Seat
X
X
X
X
window
Pencil sharpener
Bookcase
Bookcase
Reduced Stimuli Area Serves as an isolation
area.
Classroom mailboxes Supplies
(Carbone 2001)
24
Using an Organization Check List System Mailbox
Bins
(Carbone 2001)
25
Sources
  • Berda, M. Blaisdell, M.J. (1998). Science
    Projects for All Students Inclusive Science
    Activities. New York Facts on File, Inc.
  • Burgstahler, S. (2003). Working together science
    teachers and students with disabilities.
    Retrieved November 10, 2005 from
    http//www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics
    /working.teachers.html.
  • Carbone, E. (2001). Arranging the classroom with
    an eye (and ear) to students with ADHD. Teaching
    Exceptional Children, 34, 72-81.
  • Crawley, J.F., Foley, T.E., Miller, J. (2003).
    Science and students with mild disabilities.
    Intervention in School Clinic, 38(3), 160-172.
  • Hallahan, D., Kauffman, J. (2006). Exceptional
    learners an introduction to special education.
    Boston Pearson Allyn Bacon.
  • Innovative Learning Concepts, Inc. (2003).
    TouchMath. Retrieved November 10, 2005 from
    http//touchmath.com/.
  • Kirch, S.A., Bargerhuff, M., Turner, H.,
    Wheatly, M. (2005). Inclusive science education
    classroom teacher and science educator
    experiences in CLASS workshops. School Science
    Mathematics. 105(4), 175-196.

26
Sources
  • McNamara, B. (1998) Learning disabilities
    appropriate practices for a diverse population.
    New York State University of New York.
  • Mercer, C. Pullen, P. (2005). Students with
    learning disabilities. New Jersey Pearson
    Merrill Prentice Hall.
  • National Center for Education Statistics (2003).
    Status and trends in the education of american
    indians and alaska natives. Retrieved November
    19, 2005 from http//nces.ed.gov
  • National Science Foundation. (2003). Working
    together K-12 teachers and students with
    disabilities. Brochure. Seattle, Washington
    DO-IT.
  • Seckel, A. (2002). The great book of optical
    illusions. Canada Firefly Book, Ltd.
  • Steele, M. (2004). Teaching science to students
    with learning problems in the elementary
    classroom. Preventing School Failure. 49(1),
    19-21.
  • University of Washington (2003). Working
    Together K-12 Teachers and Students with
    Disabilities. Retrieved on November 6, 2005 from
    http//www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics
    /working.k12.html
  • Wikipedia (2005). Mnemonics. Retrieved November
    6, 2005 http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
  • Wisconsin Education Association Council (2001).
    Special Education Inclusion. Retrieved November
    13, 2005 from http//www.weac.org
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