New Media: web opportunities for news - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

1 / 85
About This Presentation
Title:

New Media: web opportunities for news

Description:

What are newspaper not providing now? Language in various ... Baggage Screener (MSNBC) Mill City Museum (Star Tribune) Touch Screen Voting (Sun-Sentinel) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:106
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 86
Provided by: npa4
Category:
Tags: media | msnbc | new | news | opportunities | web

less

Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: New Media: web opportunities for news


1
New Mediaweb opportunities for news
  • Nora Paul
  • Institute for New Media Studies
  • June 25, 2004

2
(No Transcript)
3
The differences
4
Progress since 1995?
  • What are newspaper not providing now?
  • Language in various expressive forms / different
    attitudes
  • Personalities / identities for reporters
  • Background How I wrote the story
  • Links to past stories
  • Follow-up on stories
  • Interaction reporter community / between
    users
  • Personalization of news
  • Supporting documents
  • Deep local news

5
Progress since 1995?
  • How will the way we tell stories change?
  • Mixed and multimedia
  • Chronological presentation through linking
  • New relationship between words and graphics
  • Stories will be annotated, footnoted
  • New story-telling software help follow threads
  • Readers as contributors
  • Linking will replace inverted pyramid

6
Have we made progress?
7
Hurdles to progress
  • Dot.com bust
  • No firm business model
  • Production line model
  • Lack of understanding about what online customers
    want / need

8
Accessing the Internet
When
Where


Base Total market Mori Research Report
9
Hours Actively Spent Online Each Week(Excluding
e-mail)
Mean Total Market 15.5 hrs.

Base Total market Mori Research Report
10
Sites Used to Get Local InformationNews, things
to do, shopping
Base Total market

11
How Did You Get to This Site?

Base Total market
12
Using the Newspaper Website
Current Use
Future Use
35
34
22
7
3

Base Total market
13
Challenges to mainstream news
  • New competition
  • New customer expectations
  • New changes to news production

14
Without tradition,
  • art

----news
  • is a flock of sheep without
  • a shepherd. Without innovation,
  • it is a corpse.
  • Winston Churchill

15
The New Competition
  • Out2
  • Village Soup
  • Daytona Beach Live
  • BeniciaNews

16
Ed SchlenkerPublisher, GetLocalNews
  • In smaller bedroom communities, you have
  • a monopoly on media one paper. You dont
  • get aggressive journalism. The government
  • is run by insiders, the newspaper publisher
  • is an insider. People are hungering for
  • independent information.

17
New customer expectations
  • New media is interactive. In contrast to old
    media where the order of presentation is fixed,
    the user can now interact with a media object. In
    the process of interaction the user can choose
    which elements to display or which paths to
    follow, thus generating a unique work. In this
    way the user becomes the co-author of the work.
  • Lev Manovich The Language of New Media

18
New changes to news production
  • Digital asset management systems
  • New relationships between analog and digital news
    streams

19
Stages
  • Evangelize
  • Equip
  • Empower
  • Engage

20
Simon Waldman Director of Digital Publishing,
Guardian Newspapers
  • "The newspaper industry is no longer
  • about the print product, but about a
  • tapestry of news products. ... The
    smarter newspapers will see the print, online and
    wireless editions as a whole and manage
    accordingly. It's clear that the whole will have
    the value."

21
The hard parts
  • Equipping
  • Empowering

22
The opportunity
  • To be ENGAGING
  • Involve the community
  • Profile real people
  • Provide an experience
  • Do things online you cant offline
  • Create long-shelf life content

23
John Battelle, Industry Standard
  • You have to stop thinking about being in
  • the business of print and think about being
  • in the business of community The
  • Internet forces you to go back to square
  • one and say, How am I bringing together
  • a community?'

24
Involve the community
  • Waterfront Renaissance (Everett Herald,WA)
  • Fix Your Commute (Everett Herald, WA)
  • Ax and Tax (Seattle Times)
  • 20Below (Maine Today)

25
Profile real people
  • Interactive Obits (Spokesman Review)
  • First Coast Community (FLTimes-Union)
  • I Was So Cute Back Then (JournalNow)

26
Create stories that let people experience /
explore
  • Baggage Screener (MSNBC)
  • Mill City Museum (Star Tribune)
  • Touch Screen Voting (Sun-Sentinel)
  • Invention for 900 Hands (NY Times)
  • September 12th

27
Experiment with new forms
  • Drogas (El Mundo)
  • Gene Safari (BBC)
  • Big Plane, Small Planet (CSM)

28
Do online what you cant offline
  • A Day in the Life of One of Our Schools
    (Rochester Democrat-Chronicle)
  • ONA Training Module
  • Voices for the Land (Star Tribune online)
  • Language Lessons (Fargo Forum)
  • Collision Course (Cincinnati.com)
  • Against Their Will (JournalNow)

29
Create long shelf-life content
  • Webtowns (Seattle P-I)
  • Transportation (Seattle P-I)
  • Hurricane Center (Tampa Bay Online)
  • Kansas Legislature (Lawrence Journal-World)
  • Toxic Treats (Orange Co. Register)

30
Good ideas from St. Cloud
  • Readers as reporters Gas Prices
  • Give them a watercooler Comments
  • Organize ongoing stories MN Troops
  • Expand the newshole Photo Gallery

31
Michael Zimbalist, exec. director of the Online
Publishers Association
  • People are forming strong emotional bonds
  • to online content the way they do to print
  • content. But as for finding the right model
  • to exploit that bond, the jury is very much
  • still out.
  • Folio, Nov.1, 2003 -foliomag.com/ar/marketing_maki
    ng_web_sites/index.htm

32
Elements of digital storytelling
  • www.inms.umn.edu/elements
  • MEDIA
  • ACTION
  • RELATIONSHIP
  • CONTEXT
  • COMMUNICATION

33
Element 1 media
  • Single Medium AZ Daily Sun
  • Multiple Media Betrayal in the Ranks
  • Multimedia Safari Unclogging a Drain
  • Questions
  • How do people process multimedia versus single
    media packages?
  • Does multimedia impede or enhance understanding /
    retention?

34
Element 2 action
  • Static / Passive Strom Thurmond Dies
  • Static / Active Mill City Museum
  • Dynamic / Passive Strom Thurmond Dies Homeless
    not Hopeless
  • Dynamic / Active Game Museum
  • Questions
  • Whats better, letting people select or just
    delivering the content?
  • Is dynamic or static content more compelling?

35
Element 3 relationship
  • Linear Turkey Fuel
  • Non-linear U Street in Focus
  • Questions
  • What form results in more comprehensive reading /
    use?
  • Does the non-linear presentations selection
    process increase engagement?

36
Element 3 relationship
  • Manipulation
  • DIY Network Room Planner
  • Waterfront Renaissance
  • Questions
  • Does manipulation improve engagement?
  • Does experiencing content help with
    understanding the issues?

37
Element 3 relationship
  • Calculation
  • Find your Inner Republican
  • Ax and Tax
  • Questions
  • Does this sort of input and calculation tracking
    engage users?
  • Does this sort of interaction help people better
    understand the issues?

38
Element 3 relationship
  • Customization
  • Crimetracker
  • Questions
  • Does customizing make people see only a small
    part of the whole story?
  • Does it help make the news more personal?

39
Element 4 context
  • Embedded Slate
  • Sidebar Lightrail Debuts
  • Questions
  • Which method gets peoples attention?
  • Which method results in greater linking to
    related materials?

40
Element 5 communication
  • With reporters Seattle Times
  • Chat MSNBC
  • Between readers St. Cloud Times
  • Questions
  • How do people want to be communicated with?
  • Who do people want to communicate with?
  • What is the main objective of the communication?

41
Research
  • Current levels of use
  • Need baseline measures
  • Audience effects research
  • Which combinations of elements work best
  • Recommendations to practitioners
  • When to deploy effort with new story forms

42
current practices study 1
  • Homepage Finding Overview
  • Relationship Less than 1/3 utilized open
    content.
  • Action 90 of homepage contents were static.
  • Media Over half of the stories were single
    medium (print only).

43
current practices study 2
  • Special Project Package Finding Overview
  • Relationship Only 1/4 utilized open content.
  • Action Most static or dynamic / active.
  • Media Virtually all were multiple media.

44
effects testing
  • Testing for flow between different styles of
    news infographics

Zoom graphic Dynamic / active Non-linear Mult
iple media

3D graphic Dynamic / active Manipulable Multi
ple media

Baseball card Static / passive Multiple media

Animated graphic Dynamic / passive to Dynamic /
active, Non-linear, Multimedia

45
results?
46
We need to know more
  • New media has its own expressive properties
    encyclopedic, spatial, procedural, participatory.
    Janet Murray
  • The conventions of new media are still being
    formed.
  • There is still much to be learned.

47
A vision of tomorrows news
48
Online Journalism Education - LA
  • 70 new-media department editors in Latin
    American papers say their greatest need in terms
    of training is creation of multimedia content
    second biggest writing for the web (17 percent).
  • 53 of online journalists in Latin America have
    no academic background in online journalism.
  • 61 of new-media academic programs are taught as
    courses or seminars. More than half of the
    journalists asked say that the quality of such
    programs is not good.  
  • Only 43 of the media surveyed offer in-office
    digital journalism training for their
    journalists.
  • From Guillermo Francos
  • The State of Online Journalism in Latin America

49
Implications for journalism education
  • Writing across media
  • Editing issues online
  • The backpack journalist

50
Online Writing
  • Presentation by Elizabeth Osder to the American
    Copy Editors Society.

51
Writing Editing for Online
  • Elizabeth A. OsderVisiting Professor USC
    AnnenbergDeputy Editor, Online Journalism
    Reviewosder_at_usc.edu

52
What Is Writing for Online?
  • Its the creation of copy generated from
  • Broadcast scripts
  • Newspaper and wire stories
  • Original to the medium
  • Digitally distributed to
  • Websites
  • Newsletters and dispatches
  • Wireless and other devices

53
Editing for Online Readers
  • Provide value to your readers, viewers,
    interactors
  • Limited time
  • Infinite options
  • Immediacy
  • The price of a click
  • Download times

54
Writing for Online News
  • Language is critical
  • Reductive
  • Literal
  • To the point
  • Structure and format matter
  • Contextual and annotative
  • Navigation is the narrative

55
Scan-able Text
  • Highlighted keywords
  • Hypertext links
  • Typeface variations
  • Meaningful sub-headings
  • Bulleted lists

56
Scan-able Text
  • One idea per paragraph
  • Inverted pyramid style works
  • Half the word count (or less) than conventional
    writing

57
Elements of the Web Story
Full Story
Brief
Promo
58
Elements of the Promo
  • Homepage promotional copy
  • Should
  • Explains the story
  • Work for the reader
  • Work for search engines
  • Contains
  • Headline 30-40 characters
  • Deck 20-25 words
  • Links

59
Promos
60
Promos
61
Headlines
  • Fewer than six to 10 words
  • Use strong verbs
  • Put the most important word first
  • Avoid articles at the start of a headline
  • Use question headlines if the subject is
    interesting enough to entice readers

62
Online Decks
  • Entice readers to read more
  • 1-2 sentences long
  • Often repeats the lead
  • Tips
  • Write a clear summary
  • Avoid writing summaries that repeat the headline
  • Address the reader when appropriate

63
Deck is the Lead
64
Deck is Not the Lead
Time Stamp
65
Online Briefs
  • Similar to blurbs - often repeat lead of the
    story
  • Can be a few paragraphs long
  • Can stand alone - in place of a story
  • Offers the reader a choice of layers.
  • Some readers want to read only the headlines,
    others want a brief summary and others want the
    complete story.

Full Story
Brief
Brief
Promo
Proo
66
Envisioning the Web Story
  • Elements
  • Headline
  • Summary
  • Main story (scroll or chunks)
  • Breaking news (brief or update)
  • Hyperlinks
  • Timelines
  • Full text docs (speeches, etc)
  • Multimedia (video, audio)
  • Searchable databases
  • Interactive elements (polls, games, quiz, email
    links)

Storyboards
Main Story
Interactive
Timeline
Bios
Documents
Video
67
Copyediting Online Whats the Same?
Whats Different?
  • Nora Paul
  • Director, Institute for New Media Studies
  • University of Minnesota
  • npaul_at_umn.edu

68
BUT.
69
differences exist.
  • Some rules are different
  • Some AP and print style rules dont work online.
    Sentences and paragraphs have to be kept a lot
    shorter. If the writers dont do it, the copy
    editors have to step in.
  • There are some style variances from print to
    account for worldwide readership (we have to be
    sensitive to datelines, time zones, etc.)
  • Headlines have different rules online than in
    print
  • Style is different
  • Our standards for grammar, punctuation and syntax
    are generally the same but the process is not.
    We do believe in creating a different style and
    have been working on delineating what that should
    be.
  • Headlines have different rules online than in
    print

70
differences exist
  • Process is different
  • Style is the same, but the editing process is
    not..
  • On the print side, a story gets
    written, looked at by a desk editor, then worked
    over in minute detail by a copy editor. Then it
    is checked by the managing copy editor, and gets
    final approval by the chief copy editor. Once
    laid out, it gets printed off and re-checked on
    hard copy by another copy editor for errors in
    headlines, breakers, etc.
  • Online there is no formal copy editing
    staff whatsoever. In most cases an assignment /
    site editor will look at the story quickly either
    just before it is posted or, if it is a
    quick-breaking piece, immediately after it goes
    up online. But in some cases where nobody is
    available to check the copy, the person writing
    the story posts it directly once it is ready to
    go. If there is nobody available to look at it
    (due to chronic under-staffing), nobody in
    editorial buy the writer sees the story before it
    is posted.

71
differences exist
  • Experience level is different
  • We use the same copyediting guidelines, but we
    arent nearly as familiar with them.
  • Volume is different
  • Since the online site has more copy and
    additional resources, there is more copy editing
    to do with online material

72
  • Well

73
  • Yes
  • You bet it does!
  • Yes, and most of the copy editors are veteran
    newspaper copy editors.
  • Editors in the online department look at it for
    copyediting.
  • Everything on the site has to clear with the slot
    or the news service copy editors.
  • At the latimes.com and OJR, two places Ive
    worked, we copyedited original content as
    rigorously as print copy.
  • We even do edits on our weblogs.

74
  • Sometimes
  • Special projects undergo a copy editing procedure
    but breaking news does not
    this about breaking news not getting copyediting
    attention and material produced by non-news
    partners does not get copyedited.
  • Weve got two part-time copyeditors, if they are
    available and someone remembers to ask them, then
    yes, it goes through formal copyediting.
  • Sometimes, though not always. There is no copy
    desk, per se, but the team is loaded with veteran
    news people, many of whom have been copy editors
    and serve in that capacity on demand.
  • Sort of
  • Our copy editing is not as extensive as on the
    print side maybe one or two editors look at it
    before going live.

75
  • Not yet but going to
  • Several people mentioned that they are planning
    to add copyedit / rewrite desks for the web for
    breaking news.
  • No
  • Not yet, I would like to add that to the mix, but
    it is currently read by an online producer before
    going onto the site.
  • We have no formal copy editing staff. Assignment
    editors also write some of their own copy, as
    well as assigning things to writers and
    freelancers, and they are responsible for all
    copy editing and story posting duties. Due to
    story volume and workload, there is usually not
    time available to copy-edit stories so they
    sometimes get posted by the person who wrote them

76
  • Interesting comment
  • We find that copy desk experience is among
    the most important in finding well-qualified
    online producers. We want the benefits of copy
    editing built-into a small operation that doesnt
    allow a dedicated desk.

77
It depends
78
on
  • Style issues
  • Sometimes cut them for length or rewrite to
    emphasize breaking news.
  • Headlines are edited and summary grafs are
    sometimes rewritten from the lead paragraph of
    print stories.
  • Typos / errors
  • I often notice things that need to be fixed and,
    obviously, correct them.
  • Time constraints
  • Breaking news goes right up without any online
    editing.
  • Additional material
  • We add enhancements like related web sties,
    stock numbers, etc. if we have time.
  • While the text was shovelware from the print
    side - we have to add promos heads and decks
    on index pages to link to top stories

79
Interesting comment
  • Review is more accurate than edit. Although
    our online producers have reporting, copy editing
    and assignment-editing experience, breaking news
    from the print newsroom should generally be
    changed/corrected by originating reporter/editor
    if an online review raises serious questions. At
    the same time, producers who sometimes need to
    write breaking news themselves must go through a
    review process by the best option available a
    newsroom editor when available, or another
    experienced online producer.

80
Biggest copyediting issues for online
  • Lack of time and staff
  • Scheduling Most original copy is made during the
    day, but copy editors work at night. Trying to
    staff around the clock to match the continuous
    online news cycle is a challenge.
  • Deadline pressure is double prints
  • Writing promos
  • Forgetting the adage Get it first, but first
    get it right.

81
Biggest copyediting issue for online
Communication with print side editors
  • They dont understand how online works
  • Getting them to flag final version for online
  • Changes made to print text but online is not
    told
  • Culture clash online is urgent, copyeditors are
    methodical
  • Set in their workflow, not available to online
  • Getting print editors to give it to online now,
    not just when they get a chance

82
What the next generation needs to know
  • How to work like a wire service
  • How to work online and in print
  • How to balance speed and accuracy
  • How online writing differs from print and
    broadcast
  • How to edit different Web presentation forms

83
PrintOnlineWhatever
  • If youre good, you have a
  • bright future ahead of you.
  • The world will always need
  • copy editors.

84
Great resources for online journalism classes
  • UC-Berkeleys Multimedia Reporting and
    Convergence http//journalism.berkeley.edu/multim
    edia/
  • Online Journalism Course Syllabi
    http//ojr.org/ojr/education/1081489206.php
  • Donica Mensings assignments http//www.jour.unr.
    edu/donica/453/index.html

85
(No Transcript)
Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
About PowerShow.com