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Universal Design

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Make reach comfortable seated or standing. Accommodate variations in hand and grip size ... Make the structure of the website as visible as possible (Yahoo, hhs.gov) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Universal Design


1
Universal Design
  • Ensuring access to the Internet for all users

2
"The world is harder when it is not conceived
for you."
  • http//www.ad-awards.com/inc/video.swf?id104

3
Universal Design
  • The design of products and environments to be
    usable by all people, to the greatest extent
    possible, without the need for adaptation or
    specialized design.

4
Universal Design Principles
  • (1) Equitable Use
  • The design is useful and marketable to people
    with differing abilities.
  • Provide the same means for all users identical
    or equivalent
  • Provisions for privacy, security and safety
    equally available
  • Make design appealing to all users

5
Universal Design Principles
  • (2) Flexibility in Use
  • Provide choice in methods
  • Facilitate users accuracy and precision
  • Adapt to users pace

6
Universal Design Principles
  • (3) Simple and Intuitive
  • Eliminate unnecessary complexity
  • Be consistent with user expectations
  • Accommodate a range of literacy/language skills
  • Arrange information consistent with importance
  • Provide feedback during and after

7
Universal Design Principles
  • (4) Perceptible Information
  • Use different modes (visual, verbal, tactile)
  • Provide adequate contrast (foreground/background)
  • Maximize legibility
  • Differentiate elements in ways that can be
    described (instructions/directions)
  • Provide compatibility with a variety of
    techniques or devices

8
Universal Design Principles
  • (5) Tolerance for error
  • Arrange elements to minimize errors
  • Provide warnings
  • Provide fail-safe features

9
Universal Design Principles
  • (6) Low Physical Effort
  • Minimize repetitive actions
  • Allow user to maintain neutral body position
  • Minimize sustained physical effort
  • Use reasonable operating forces

10
Universal Design Principles
  • (7) Size and space for approach
  • and use
  • Provide a clear line of sight to important
    elements
  • Make reach comfortable seated or standing
  • Accommodate variations in hand and grip size
  • Provide adequate space for assistive devices or
    attendant

11
Universal Design Principles
  • TRACE Center University of Wisconsin
  • http//trace.wisc.edu/world/
  • Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST)
  • http//www.cast.org/udl/UniversalDesignforLearning
    361.cfm

12
The Issues
  • Individuals with disabilities
  • Universal user access
  • Legal mandates
  • Business productivity

13
Individuals with disabilities
  • Adults, youth and children in every social sector
    and ethnic group
  • Largest minority in the U.S. and growing
  • Currently 55 million people in U.S.
  • 18.7 of population, not including LD
  • 75 million people worldwide
  • Responsible for over 1 trillion in aggregate
    income

14
AARP Web Access Guidelines
  • Use conventional interaction elements
  • Make it obvious what is clickable and what is not
  • Make clickable items easy to target and hit
  • Minimize vertical scrolling eliminate horizontal
    scrolling
  • Ensure the Back button behaves predictably.

15
  • Let the user stay in control
  • Is there clear feedback on actions?
  • Provide feedback in other modes than visual
  • Make the structure of the website as visible as
    possible (Yahoo, hhs.gov)
  • Clearly label content categories assist
    recognition and retrieval rather than recall
  • Implement the shallowest possible information
    hierarchy

16
  • Include a site map and link to it from every page
  • Make pages easy to skim and scan
  • Make elements on the page easy to read
  • Visually group related topics
  • Make sure text and background colors contrast
  • Use adequate white space
  • Make it easy to find things on the page quickly

17
  • Focus the writing on audience and purpose
  • Use the users language minimize jargon and
    technical terms

18
User Access Issues
  • Browser
  • Platform
  • Language
  • Connection speed
  • Bandwidth
  • Hardware
  • Software
  • Input
  • Output

19
Legal Issues
  • Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
  • Public accommodations must be accessible
  • Rehabilitation Act, Section 508
  • Federal agencies required to be accessible
  • World Wide Web Consortium
  • Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) Accessibility
    guidelines
  • Company/Institution policy

20
Business Productivity Issues
  • Increase your share of the market
  • Qualify for government contracts
  • Distinguish yourself from the competition
  • Improve general usability
  • Bragging rights IBM, Southwest Airlines, others

21
Usability Issues
  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Manual
  • Cognitive

22
Usability Issues
  • Blind speaking browsers, screen readers
  • Low vision magnifiers, high contrast
  • Deaf/hard of hearing visual alternatives for
    audio content
  • Mobility impairments alternative browsing,
    navigation devices, voice input
  • Cognitive/learning disabilities combination of
    solutions

23
Strategies for Accessibility
  • Present information in multiple formats
  • Visual/auditory, graphic/text
  • Duplicate functions in two methodologies
  • Form/e-mail, table/no table, color/no color
  • Test site for accessibility

24
Visual Disorders
  • Blind
  • Visually impaired
  • Color blind/color sensitive
  • Seizure disorder

25
Blackboard Accessibility
  • Blackboard is working with our WebAIM partner,
    Equal Access to Software and Information (EASI)
    to serve our software users with disabilities. As
    part of this effort, Blackboard and EASI have
    developed this screen reader tutorial. This
    tutorial includes information such as logging in,
    navigating through the Blackboard navigation
    frames, using the Blackboard Portal and course
    Web sites, and using the Discussion Board
    feature.
  • http//products.blackboard.com/cp/bb5/access/index
    .cgi

26
WebCT Accessibility
  • WebCT is committed to the accessibility of our
    e-Learning platform. Accommodation of learners of
    all needs helps increase the availability of high
    quality educational experiences to every
    individual. Users of WebCT include an increasing
    number of students with sensory, physical or
    learning disabilities, who rely on adaptive
    technologies for a gateway to information and
    education. WebCT is working with leaders in the
    accessibility field to ensure that our software
    complies with both industry standards and federal
    guidelines for accessibility.
  • http//www.webct.com/products/

27
Users Who Are Blind
  • Screen reader programs (text to speech)
  • JAWS
  • (http//www.freedomscientific.com/fs_products/sof
    tware_jaws.asp)
  • IBM Home Page Reader
  • http//www-3.ibm.com/able/solution_offerings/
    hpr.html
  • ReadPlease 2000
  • (http//www.readplease.com/)
  • Connect OutLoud (web access)
  • (http//www.freedomscientific.com/fs_products/soft
    ware_connect.asp)

28
JAWS Commands
  • Basic JAWS Screen Reading Keys
  • Reading of the screen is done by pressing keys on
    the numeric keypad (NUM PAD), sometimes in
    combination with other keys on the keyboard. When
    JAWS is loaded, the NUM LOCK is turned off, so
    that these keys represent movement keys, such as
    left arrow, right arrow, page up, and so on.
  • Read by Character
  • To begin reading with JAWS, put your middle three
    fingers on the numeric keypad, with your middle
    finger on the number 5, the one with the raised
    bump. Your pointer finger should be resting on
    the left arrow (NUM PAD 4) and your ring finger
    on the right arrow (NUM PAD 6).
  • Press the NUM PAD 5 to speak the current
    character.
  • Press the RIGHT ARROW to move and read the next
    character.
  • Press the LEFT ARROW to move and read the prior
    character.

29
  • Read by Word
  • To read by words, tuck your thumb under and press
    down the Insert key (NUM PAD 0) while pressing
    any of the three keys above.
  • Press INSERTNUM PAD 5 to speak the current word
    at the cursor.
  • Press INSERTNUM PAD RIGHT ARROW to move to and
    speak the next word.
  • Press INSERTNUM PAD LEFT ARROW to move to and
    speak the prior word.

30
  • Read by Line
  • Press UP ARROW to move to and read the previous
    line, DOWN ARROW to move to and speak the next
    line, and INSERTUP ARROW to read the current
    line. To read an entire document with one
    keystroke, press INSERTDOWN ARROW. This last
    keystroke is called the Say All command, and is
    used frequently with JAWS.
  • Read Sentences
  • To move to and read the previous sentence, press
    ALTUP ARROW. To move to and read the next
    sentence press ALTDOWN ARROW. To read the
    current sentence, press ALTNUM PAD 5.

31
  • Read Paragraphs
  • To move to and read the prior paragraph, press
    CTRLUP ARROW. To move to and read the next
    paragraph press CTRLDOWN ARROW. To read the
    current paragraph press CTRLNUM PAD 5.
  • There are many other keystrokes used for reading
    with JAWS, but these are the basic ones most
    people use.

32
  • Example html to text
  • logo.gif spcr.gif admin_cart_0410.gif
    admin_acct_0410.gif admin_help_0410.gif
    admin_status_0410.gif spcr.gif
    tab_cap_left.gif tab_home_cold.gif
    tab_pipe.gif tab_books_cold.gif
    tab_pipe.gif tab_oop_cold.gif tab_pipe.gif
    tab_textbooks_cold.gif tab_pipe.gif
    tab_bargain_books_cold.gif tab_pipe.gif
    tab_ebooks_cold.gif tab_pipe.gif
    tab_article_cold.gif tab_pipe.gif
    tab_music_cold.gif tab_pipe.gif
    tab_dvd_cold.gif tab_pipe.gif
    tab_pcvideo_games_cold.gif tab_pipe.gif
    tab_magazines_cold.gif tab_pipe_clear.gif
    tab_online_hot.gif tab_cap_right.gif
    spcr.gif spcr.gif About BNU spcr.gif
    whitedot.gif spcr.gif Browse All Courses
    spcr.gif whitedot.gif spcr.gif Teach for
    BNU spcr.gif whitedot.gif spcr.gif Tell a
    Friend spcr.gif whitedot.gif spcr.gif BNU
    HelpDesk spcr.gif whitedot.gif spcr.gif BNU
    FAQs spcr.gif whitedot.gif spcr.gif Contact
    BNU spcr.gif spcr.gif spcr.gif spcr.gif
    spcr.gif www.powered.com spcr.gif spcr.gif
    spcr.gif spcr.gif vcart_header3.gif
    cleardot.gif cleardot.gif cleardot.gif
    cleardot.gif cleardot.gif cleardot.gif
    cleardot.gif cleardot.gif No items in cart.
    cleardot.gif cleardot.gif cleardot.gif
    vcart_checkout3.gif spcr.gif New Students
    It's FREE! Register today! button_registernow.gif
    orange_arrow.gif More Info spcr.gif
  • University Login
  • Nickname (Case Sensitive) _______
  • Password (Case Sensitive) _______
  • button_login.gif-Submit
  • Forgot your nickname or password? spcr.gif
  • bluedot.gif About BNU bluedot.gif Browse All
    Courses bluedot.gif Teach for BNU bluedot.gif
    Tell a Friend bluedot.gif BNU HelpDesk
    bluedot.gif BNU FAQs bluedot.gif Contact BNU
    spcr.gif mc_bug.gif spcr.gif
    tan_curved_line.gif spcr.gif spcr.gif
    main.gif
  • Welcome! Try one of our FREE online courses
    today! Barnes Noble University offers more than
    50 courses every month on a wide variety of
    subjects -- from poetry to finance to
    programming. Our courses are designed to provide
    you with in-depth learning and are all taught by
    authors and experts! So join our online learning
    program. . . .

33
Users Who Are Blind
  • Braille output programs
  • PowerBraille (http//www.freedomscientific.com/
    fs_products/displays_40.asp)
  • ALVA Braille Display
  • (http//www.alvabraille.com/BrailleDisplays/)

34
Users Who Are Blind
  • Potential problems
  • Graphics (photos, clip art, diagrams, etc.)
  • Links
  • Navigation
  • Image maps
  • Tables
  • Frames
  • Forms
  • Abbreviations, acronyms, other languages

35
Users Who Are Blind
  • Suggested solutions
  • Graphics
  • Include an ALT tag in the ltIMG SRCgt code. The
    ALT tag should tell the user what the graphic is
    in a few words.
  • EX ltIMG SRCmydog.jpg ALTPhoto of my dog
    Spotgt
  • Non-active images that do not convey information
    should have ALT.

36
  • For longer descriptions, use the LONGDESC tag
    in the ltIMG SRCgt code, which links to another
    .html page with a longer text description.
  • EX ltIMG SRCmydog.jpg ALTPhoto of my dog
    Spot LONGDESCmydog.htmlgt
  • Insert a D-link immediately after the image.
  • EX ltIMG SRCmydog.jpg ALT-Photo of my dog
    SpotgtltA HREF./mydog.htmlgtDlt/Agt

37
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  • Graphics
  • Use appropriate markup language or text instead
    of graphics where available.
  • EX Mathematical equations
  • Identify the meaning of variables, provide the
    formula in text as well as graphics, use MathML
    or TeX markup language.

39
  • Find the square root of 36, then divide that by
    2, then multiply the answer by 3.

  • Divide 36 by 2, find the square root of the
    answer, then multiply that by 3.
  • Multiply 2 times 3, divide the answer into 36,
    then find the square root of that number.
  • Divide the square root of 36 by the product of 2
    times 3.

40
Users Who Are Blind
  • Links
  • Clearly label graphics used as links with
    descriptive alt tag
  • Include alternate text links on page
  • Separate text links with spaces
  • EX
  • ltA HREFcourses.html ALTLink to list of
    coursesgt Courseslt/AgtltA HREF faculty.html
    ALTLink to list of faculty teaching
    coursesgtFacultylt/Agt ltA HREFregistr.html
    ALTRegistration formgtRegistrationlt/Agt

41
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42
Users Who Are Blind
  • Navigation
  • Keep links together
  • If navigation links precede page content, provide
    a method to skip to main content
  • Ex lthtmlgtltbodygtltA HREFmain ALTSkip to main
    contentgtnbsplt/Agt

43
Users Who Are Blind
  • Image maps
  • Use client side maps, not server maps
  • Include an ALT tag for each area of the map.
  • Include a LONGDESC to a file with a more
    complete site map if the image map is extensive.
  • EXAMPLE ltMAP NAME"map1"gt
  • ltarea shape"rect" COORDS"92,55,257,85
  • HREF"./preview.html" ALTLink to Program
    Preview"gt
  • Include separate descriptive text links on the
    page.

44
Users Who Are Blind
  • Tables
  • Include the ltTHgt tag and use the table header to
    give a description of the contents of the table
    column.
  • Use the ltTITLEgt tag to give the table a title
    that helps the user understand what is in the
    table.
  • Also include the information in the table in text
    somewhere in the document.
  • Avoid using multiple columns of text.
  • Avoid using the ltTABLEgt code for page layout.

45
Users Who Are Blind
  • Frames
  • Clearly NAME and TITLE frames and indicate how
    they relate to each other
  • EX ltFRAMESET ROWS"100,"gt   ltFRAME
    NAME"titlebar" SRC"titlebar.html" TITLE"Title
    Bar"gt   ltFRAMESET COLS"25,"gt     ltFRAME
    NAME"navbar" SRC"navbar.html" TITLE"Navigation
    Bar"gt     ltFRAME NAME"main" SRC"main.html"
    TITLE"Main Content Frame"gt   lt/FRAMESETgt
    lt/FRAMESETgt

46
  • Provide alternative format for non-frame
    browsers.
  • Separate HTML page with link from the main page
  • NOFRAME markup in main page

47
Users Who Are Blind
  • Forms
  • Include an e-mail address or e-mail link as an
    alternative method of sending the required
    information.
  • Ensure that labels for all form controls are
    properly positioned.
  • EX ltLABEL for"firstname"gtFirst name ltINPUT
    type"text" id"firstname" tabindex"1"gt lt/LABELgt

48
Users Who Are Blind
  • Downloadable/Printable Documents
  • Include downloads in multiple formats that are
    accessible to screen readers, enlargers, etc.
  • Newest version of Adobe Acrobat can be made
    readable with screen reader in Windows 2000.
  • EX On-line registration form
  • Registration form in .pdf format
  • Registration form in HTML format

49
Users Who Are Blind
  • Lists
  • Number the text manually rather than through the
    ltOLgt tag if the numbers are important.
  • Numbered items 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, etc. is more
    meaningful than embedded lists.
  • Do not use lists for page formatting

50
Users Who Are Blind
  • Use structural markup for its designated purpose
  • Ex Use H1, H2, etc. for true headings
  • Use font size__ to change font size
  • Use ltBLOCKQUOTEgt for quotations, not for
    indentation

51
Users Who Are Visually Impaired
  • Screen display enlargement programs
  • Zoomtext (display enlargement voice output)
  • (http//www.aisquared.com/)
  • MAGic
  • (http//www.freedomscientific.com/fs_products/soft
    ware_magic.asp)

52
ZoomText
  • http//www.aisquared.com/Products/zoomtexttour/ind
    ex.cfm

53
MAGic
  • http//www.freedomscientific.com/fs_products/softw
    are_magic.asp

54
Users Who Are Visually Impaired
  • Potential Problem
  • Poor quality graphics or graphics too small
  • Potential solutions
  • Create graphics with accessibility in mind
  • Add ltaltgt tags to graphics

55
Users Who Are Visually Impaired
  • Potential Problem
  • Difficult navigation (e.g. links are not
    underlined, dotted box is difficult to see)
  • Suggested solutions
  • Make links appear underlined, even if they are
    graphical
  • Use correct stylesheet elements to highlight text
    links

56
Dotted box around Resources is difficult to
see. Put this code in a file called
"highlight.css" aactive, afocus, ahover
background FFFF66 color 000000border
solid 990000 font-weight bold padding 3px
and you will get -
Internet Explorer text link
57
  • To highlight input boxes
  • Use the ltspangt or ltdivgt element around each form
    element and you will get

58
Users Who Are Visually Impaired
  • Other Potential problems
  • Poor contrast on the screen
  • Embedded style cannot be changed

59
Users Who Are Visually Impaired
  • Suggested solutions
  • Use the ALT tag for graphics
  • Include text links as well as graphic links
  • Use style sheets to set page display so that
    users can change the appearance using the
    preferences feature
  • Be sure that documents can be read without the
    associated style sheets

60
Users Who Are Visually Impaired
  • Use relative units rather than defined units
  • Ex Table width100, FONT SIZE1
  • Do not set pages to automatically refresh or
    redirect
  • Use navigation mechanisms in a consistent manner
    links to the same page should have the same
    text every time they occur

61
Users Who Are Color-Blind or Color-Sensitive
  • Potential problems
  • Red/green deficiency
  • Sensitivity to certain colors or bright lights
  • www.visibone.com/colorblind/
  • http//more.btexact.com/people/rigdence/colours/

62
Users Who Are Color-Blind or Color-Sensitive
  • Suggested solutions
  • Do not depend on color to convey information
  • Ex
  • Tell us who you are (required fields in red)
  • Company
  • Salutation
  • First name
  • Last name
  • Job title

63
Users Who Have Seizure Disorders
  • Potential Problems
  • Flashing lights, moving graphics
  • Seizures can be triggered by flashing lights in
    the range of 2Hz to 55Hz in people with
    photosensitive epilepsy (animated gifs, Flash
    screens, etc.)
  • WARNING! Flash example of flicker
    http//ncam.wgbh.org/richmedia/flicker_demo.html

64
Users Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing
  • Potential problems
  • Sound effects
  • sound cues
  • Audio descriptions
  • Background music

65
Users Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing
  • Suggested solutions
  • Provide alternate descriptive text of the audio.
  • Provide alternate visual cues.
  • Include a short acknowledgement of the
    title/composer of background music.
  • MAGpie software adds captioning to audio/video
    content
  • (http//www.webaim.org/techniques/captions/magpie/
    )

66
Users With Manual Impairment
  • Potential problems
  • Limited range of motion
  • Limited manual dexterity
  • Alternate input devices
  • Voice recognition technology
  • Switches, buttons, touch screens, light beams,
    on-screen keyboard, TAB key

67
Users with Manual Impairment
  • Dragon Naturally Speaking
  • http//www.nuance.com/naturallyspeaking/

68
Users With Manual Impairment
  • Potential Problem
  • Resizing frames
  • Suggested Solutions
  • Avoid frames altogether
  • Make sure text fits within frame size, even if
    the user enlarges the font
  • Make the border thicker or add a handle to make
    it easier to grab

69
Users With Manual Impairment
  • Potential Problem
  • Image links that are too small
  • Suggested Solutions
  • Add an invisible border around
  • the image
  • Add text with the image

Next
70
Users With Manual Impairment
  • Potential Problem
  • Small form objects (radio buttons, check boxes)
  • Suggested Solutions
  • Use the ltlabelgt tag to link the text and the form
    object

71
Users With Manual Impairment
  • Potential Problem
  • Server-side image maps are mouse dependent
  • Suggested Solutions
  • Use client-side image maps
  • Provide alternate text links

72
Users With Manual Impairment
  • Potential Problem
  • ltOnmouseovergt requires a mouse
  • Suggested Solution
  • Avoid using mouseovers to display important
    information
  • Use device-independent scripts
    (e.g. onFocus)
  • Include an alternate keyboard-accessible way to
    access the information

73
Users With Manual Impairment
  • Potential Problem
  • Too many links on one page (tabs)
  • Suggested Solutions
  • Group links under main headings
  • Provide shortcut links whenever possible (e.g.
    skip to main content)
  • Avoid using access keys as they may conflict with
    special accessibility software

74
Users With Manual Impairment
  • Suggested Solutions
  • Keep links in the same area
  • Make buttons/image map areas larger
  • Make sure that links are tab-able
  • Provide alternative response form, i.e. an
  • e-mail link

75
Users With Manual Impairment
  • Adaptive Software
  • IBM Viavoice
  • http//www-4.ibm.com/software/speech/
  • Dragon Systems Naturally Speaking
  • http//www.dragonsys.com/naturallyspeaking/
  • Synapse TAP System
  • http//www.synapseadaptive.com/synapse/stap.htm

76
Users With Cognitive Disorders
  • Potential problems
  • Reading
  • Provide alternative graphics which explain the
    text
  • Use the clearest and simplest language
    appropriate for a sites content
  • Divide large blocks of information into more
    manageable groups where natural and appropriate
  • Visual cues
  • Provide alternative sound cues.

77
Users With Cognitive Disorders
  • Potential problems
  • Complicated navigation
  • K.I.S.S.
  • Provide simpler alternative navigation links such
    as a site map with links
  • Clearly identify links and what they are for
  • If search functions are provided, enable
    different types of searches for different skill
    levels and preferences

78
Other Issues
  • Scripts
  • May be inaccessible to people using screen
    readers and/or unable to use a mouse
  • Applets and Plugins
  • Software associated with a web page should also
    be accessible

79
Other Issues
  • Pop-up windows
  • Can be confusing, disorienting
  • Users who maximize the display wont know the
    window has appeared
  • Cannot be read by screen readers

80
RESOURCES
  • Accessible University Web Pages
  • The University of Vermont
  • www.uvm.edu
  • The University of Wisconsin/Madison
  • www.wisc.edu
  • Southwest Texas University
  • www.swt.edu
  • Arizona State University
  • http//www.asu.edu/

81
  • University of Florida Distance Education
  • http//disted.ifas.ufl.edu/
  • Empire State College SUNY
  • www.esc.edu/
  • University of Maryland University College
  • www.umuc.edu/virtualteaching/

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Sample University Web Access Policy
  • University of Wisconsin/Madison
  • www.wisc.edu/wiscinfo/policy/wwwap.html
  • MIT Universal Design Web Access
  • http//web.mit.edu/ada/waccess.html

90
World Best Websites http//www.worldbestwebsites.c
om/
  • Gold Award Winners
  • http//www.balthaser.com/builder/fx_boot.asp
  • http//www.questacon.edu.au/index_flash.asp
  • http//www.profitpatterns.com/
  • http//www.penguinclassics.com/
  • http//www.davidplant.net/B4UStart/excellent_cheap
    _websites.htm

91
Which one?
Based on what you have learned about
accessibility, which one would you choose as most
accessible?
92
http//www.amazon.com
93
http//www.barnesandnoble.com
94
www.airfrance.com
95
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96
www.dreamworks.com
97
www.oscars.org
98
http//www.hp.com/hpinfo/abouthp/accessibility/ind
ex.html
99
Web Access Guidelines
  • World Wide Web Accessibility Initiative
  • http//www.w3.org/WAI/Resources/gl
  • Microsoft Access Guidelines
  • http//www.microsoft.com/enable/
  • Federal Access Board Guidelines for Government
    Purchases
  • http//www.access-board.gov or http//www.section5
    08.gov

100
  • IBM Web Accessibility Checklist and Tutorial
  • http//www-3.ibm.com/able/guidelines/web/
    accessweb.html
  • Information Technology Technical Assistance
    Training Center (ITTATC)
  • http//www.ittatc.org/training/webcourse
  • AARP Web Accessibility Guidelines
  • http//www.aarp.org/olderwiserwired/oww-resources/
    designing_web_sites_for_older_adults_heuristics.ht
    ml

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HELP for Web Authors
  • Getting Started Making a Web Site Accessible
  • www.w3.org/WAI/gettingstarted
  • Worldwide Access Accessible Web Design video
    and workbook
  • http//www.washington.edu/doit/Video/www.html
  • EASI Online Workshops
  • http//www.rit.edu/easi/access.htm
  • Resources for Web Authors
  • www.mtsu.edu/itres/help/Accessibility/index.html

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  • Designing Accessible Websites
  • http//www.infouse.com/disabilitydata/guidelines98
    .html
  • W3C Accessibility Guidelines
  • http//www.w3.org/WAI/GL/
  • AWARE (Accessible Web Authoring Resources and
    Education)
  • http//aware.hwg.org/resources
  • Web Design Group HTML Help
  • http//www.htmlhelp.com/
  • TRACE Design of HTML
  • http//trace.wisc.edu/world

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  • Creating Accessible Web Pages with
    Composer http//www.htctu.net/trainings/manuals/tu
    tmain.htm

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Other Helpful Resources
  • See how your page looks to someone who is color
    blind
  • http//www.vischeck.com
  • View your page in Lynx (text browser)
  • www.delorie.com/web/lynxview.html

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  • Dreamweaver accessibility information
  • http//www.macromedia.com/macromedia/accessibility
    /mx/dw/
  • Flash accessibility information
  • http//www.macromedia.com/macromedia/accessibility
    /features/flash/
  • Information on Web CT Web Accessibility features
  • http//booboo.webct.com/otln/webct_accessibility.h
    tm
  • Convert pdf files to html files
  • http//access.adobe.com/
  • Create accessible rich media
  • http//ncam.wgbh.org/richmedia/index.php

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Multimedia Tools
  • MAGpie (Media Access Generator)
  • http//ncam.wgbh.org
  • Apple Quicktime Pro
  • http//www.apple.com/quicktime/products
  • SMIL (Synchronized Media Integration Language)
  • http//www.w3.org/AudioVideo
  • OptiMap (translates searchable databases to text)
  • http//www.corda.com/accessibility

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  • Check your web sites accessibility
  • www.cast.org/bobby
  • http//www.webaim.org/techniques/articles/aac/whit
    epapertool
  • http//www.accent.webaim.org
  • http//www.webable.com/linkspage.html
  • http//aprompt.snow.utoronto.ca/
  • http//www.usablenet.com
  • http//www.w3.org/WAI/ER/existingtools.html

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Prepared by Carol Pope Asst. Dir. for disAbled
Student Support Services Kennesaw State
University, 770-423-6443 Feb. 22, 2005
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