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Coaching Support and Monitoring towards the

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Humanistic approach. COACH CONTROL. COACH/ATHLETE. CONTROL. ATHLETE. CONTROL. 12 years & under ... The steps of preventive discipline (Martens, 2004) H K S I ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Coaching Support and Monitoring towards the


1
Coaching Support and Monitoring towards the
Pursuit of Sporting Excellence
CHUNG, Pak Kwong Acting Chief Executive
2
Outline of Presentation
  • Coaching Roles
  • Coaching Styles
  • Athlete-coach Relationship
  • Coaching Process Skills
  • Job Responsibilities of HKSIs Head Coaches
  • Qualities of Coach
  • Leadership in Coaching
  • Management and Monitoring of Athletes

H K S I
3
Coaching Roles
Aspiration
Performance Coaching

Development Coaching
Participation Coaching
Coaching Boundary Markers
Preparation Intensity Competitions
Involvement Performance Standard
The relationship between forms of coach and
boundary criteria (Lyle, 2002)
H K S I
4
PERFORMANCE
Short duration
Intensity high
Limited non-intervention contact
Stable performance group
Short-term objectives
Competition focus
Attempted control of variables
Limited control of variable
Longer-term objectives
Participation focus
Extensive intervention and interpersonal contact
Large, variable numbers
Long duration
Intensity low
PARTICIPATION
A diagrammatic representation of the balance of
performance and participation coaching roles
(Lyle, 2002)
H K S I
5
Coaching Styles
Autocratic Coaching Practice
Negative
Directive
Coach-led
Task-centred
Performance
Decision taking
Role orientation
Goal orientation
Feedback
Communication
Positive
Interactive
Performer-led
Person-centred
Process
Democratic Coaching Practice
The distinctions between autocratic and
democratic coaching practice (Lyle, 2002)
H K S I
6
Authoritarian
Power sharing
Humanistic approach
COACH/ATHLETE CONTROL
ATHLETE CONTROL
COACH CONTROL
12 years under
13-15 years
16-17 years
18 years over
  • Empowerment
  • Athlete independence
  • ( accountability)
  • Early experiencing
  • Coach dependence
  • Developing and collaborating
  • Athlete/coach dependence

Teaching skills Safety and security Procedure and
routines Guidance in learning
Opportunities self management self
determination Shared decision making and sense
of control
Personal AUTONOMY in Self-responsibility Training
/ competitive intensity Performance
routines Strategies
Partnership
Between coach and athletes
Illustration of a shift in coaching paradigms
(Hogg, 1995)
H K S I
7
High Performance Sport Winning
Winning isnt everything, but striving to win
is
Winning isnt everything its the only thing
H K S I
8
ATHLETE
COACH
TALENT
EXPERTISE
QUALITY OF TRAINING
PREPARATION
KNOWLEDGE AND PERSONALITY
PHYSICAL
TECHNICAL
TACTICAL
PSYCHOLOGICAL
The athlete-coach relationship (adpated from
Bompa, 1983)
H K S I
9
Successful coach needs to mix art with science on
their coaching (Pyke, 1999)
H K S I
10
H K S I
11
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12
Coaching Process Skills
  • Planning
  • strategic programming
  • scheduling
  • goal setting
  • competition programming
  • Regulation
  • crisis management
  • contingency management
  • threshold decision making

Planning
Coaching Process
  • Management
  • administration
  • information management
  • financial management
  • resource management

Monitoring
Coaching Practice
Delivery
Implementation
Management
Resources
  • Craft
  • communication
  • teaching
  • problem solving
  • decision solving
  • organization
  • interpersonal skills
  • competition management
  • demonstration

Coaching process skill (Lyle, 2002)
H K S I
13
H K S I
14
Job Responsibilities of HKSIs Head Coaches
  • To design, plan and co-ordinate training and
    competition programmes for talented and elite
    athletes. To liaise with other coaches and the
    relevant national sports association to ensure
    the programmes are completed accordingly.
  • To evaluate progress of the athletes against the
    training programmes and defined targets, to take
    necessary actions to enable performance
    improvement of talented athletes and to raise the
    standards of performance of elite athletes in
    Hong Kong.

H K S I
15
Job Responsibilities of HKSIs Head Coaches
  • To create opportunities for talent to emerge
    through the related programme so that the
    development of the respective sport is enhanced.
  • To contribute technical information to in-house
    and general media publications. To contribute to
    the enhancement of the professional image of the
    HKSI.

H K S I
16
Job Responsibilities of HKSIs Head Coaches
  • To present papers for seminars and courses so
    that the concept of the HKSI as a centre of
    sports excellence can be realised.
  • To contribute towards the overall development of
    coach education programmes which contribute to
    the development of more and better local coaches.
    To motivate and train direct reporting coaches to
    become high quality international coaches.

H K S I
17
Job Responsibilities of HKSIs Head Coaches
  • To liaise with the Departments of Athlete
    Affairs, Sports Science and Medicine, Strength
    and Conditioning to ensure that athletes receive
    the relevant support, testing, analysis and
    feedback required to improve performance.
  • To manage the respective Department to ensure
    that it operates effectively, efficiently and
    within the annual financial budget.

H K S I
18
Qualities of Coach(Sabock, 1973)
  • Coaches should maintain high moral and ethical
    values.
  • Coaches must be completely honest with all those
    with whom their deals.
  • Coaches must maintain a true and lasting concern
    for all the athletes with whom their deals.

H K S I
19
Qualities of Coach(Sabock, 1973)
  • Coaches must earn the respect of their athletes,
    the school staff and the community.
  • Coaches must be able to motivate their athletes
    as well as other school and community.
  • Coaches must be dedicated to their athletes, to
    the school, and to the community.

H K S I
20
Qualities of Coach(Sabock, 1973)
  • Coaches must be a strong disciplinarian.
  • Coaches must have obvious enthusiasm.
  • Coaches should possess a strong desire to win.
  • Coaches needs to be a good evaluator of talent.

H K S I
21
Qualities of Coach(Sabock, 1973)
  • Coaches must be knowledgeable about their sports.
  • Coaches should have a good sense of humor.
  • Coaches must be willing to work long hours.
  • Coaches must have a working knowledge of their
    sport.

H K S I
22
Leadership in Coaching (Martens, 2004)
  • Leaders provide direction they set goals by
    having a vision of the future.
  • Leaders build a psychological and social
    environment that is conducive to achieving the
    teams goal.
  • Leaders instill values, in part by sharing their
    philosophy of life.

H K S I
23
Leadership in Coaching (Martens, 2004)
  • Leaders motivate members of their group to pursue
    the goals of the group.
  • Leaders confront members of the organization when
    problems arise, and they resolve conflicts.
  • Leaders communicate.

H K S I
24
Respect may be gained by (Holbrook Barr, 1979)
  • Being knowledgeable about your sport.
  • Being prepared in all situations.
  • Giving respect.
  • Treating all team members equally, but not
    necessarily the same.

H K S I
25
Respect may be gained by (Holbrook Barr, 1979)
  • Refraining from using excessive profanity.
  • Being moral and ethical in all areas of life.
  • Showing concern for athletes in and out of the
    athletic setting.
  • Being enthusiastic and showing confidence in team
    members and the team itself.

H K S I
26
Management and Monitoring of Athletes
A. Positive Discipline Athletes are coached
with tolerance, encouragement, praise, fairness,
consistency, and respect, but without criticism,
hostility, ridicule, and shame.
H K S I
27
B. Preventive Discipline
Step 6 Catch them doing good
Step 5 Conduct exciting practices
Step 3 Develop team rules
Step 4 Create team routines
Step 2 Hold team meetings
Step 1 Create the right team culture
The steps of preventive discipline (Martens, 2004)
H K S I
28
Guidelines for Handling with Athletes
Misbehaviors (Martens, 2004)
  • Be highly predictable in your dealing with
    misbehaviour.
  • Be specific about what you want the athletes to
    do or stop doing.
  • Be succinct. Avoid lecturing, nagging,
    interrogating, and moralizing.

H K S I
29
Guidelines for Handling with Athletes
Misbehaviors (Martens, 2004)
  • Be confident when you speak, but if you are not
    quite certain about the appropriate consequence,
    tell the athletes you need to give it some
    thought and will talk later.
  • Even if you feel angry, remain calm and in
    control.
  • Once you gain compliance, do not keep athlete in
    the dog house. Forgive and forget.

H K S I
30
Conclusion
Successful coaches are those who can learn new
skills, who are flexible enough to change old
ways when change is needed, who can accept
constructive criticism, and who can critically
evaluate themselves.
H K S I
31
A mediocre coach tells,
A good coach explains,
A superior coach demonstrates,
But the great coach inspires (Martens, 2004)
H K S I
32
(No Transcript)
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