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Mentoring Matters: Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships

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Cultural, Ethnic and Social Diversity. Language Diversity. Special Needs ... Moving in clockwise fashion, every member, in turn, responds for up to one minute. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Mentoring Matters: Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships


1
Mentoring Matters Roles, Responsibilities, and
Relationships
  • Alabama Teacher Mentoring Program Training 1

Alabama
Governors
Commission on State Department of Education


Quality Teaching
2
Objectives
  • Participants will
  • become familiar with two parts of the Framework
    for the Alabama Teacher Mentor (ATM) program
  • begin to establish a vision for successful
    induction of beginning teachers
  • commit to mentoring
  • review skills in communications, especially those
    that promote reflection
  • join a network of mentor-teachers

3
Agenda Mentoring Matters
  • Overview Goals, Agenda, Norms, Warm-up
  • Introduction to Alabama Quality Teaching
    Standards (AQTS)
  • The Mentor Mission Rationale for Mentoring
  • Major Challenges Reflecting on the First Year
    of Teaching. Arenas of work for the mentor
  • Expectations of Mentor Role Training Overview
  • Developing Relationships/Fostering Reflection

4
Group Norms
  • Be a learnerbe open to new ideas.
  • Respect otherslisten to understand.
  • Ask questionsseek clarification.
  • Keep things confidential within the group.
  • Have fun!

5
Bingo
  • Find someone to sign and answer each of the
    squares on your Bingo card. (No one can answer
    more than one of the squares on your card.)
  • Complete all squares to score Bingo!

6
Why Mentoring?
7
Why Mentoring?
  • More importantly, to provide a helping hand so
    that beginning teachers develop into effective
    teachers as soon as possible.

8
Why Mentoring?
  • Of the in-school factors that affect learning,
    the quality of teaching is the most important by
    far.
  • Marzano, Robert J. What Works in Schools
    Translating Research into Action. 2003.
  • What teachers doand dont doaffects student
    learning outcomes.
  • Mentors can help beginning teachers develop into
    quality teachers.

9
Setting a Vision of Quality Teaching
  • If you walked into that teachers classroom, what
    would you see to let you know that he or she was
    effective?
  • What would the teacher be doing?
  • What would they have done before and after each
    lesson that contributed to their effectiveness?
  • What would you see in the classroom that would
    make you know, THIS IS QUALITY?
  • Write legibly and use just a few words.

List each idea on a separate post-it.
10
In your groups
  • Share-Around your ideas.
  • One person begin by sharing one Post-it idea.
  • Move around the table, with each person sharing
    one idea.
  • Look for commonalities. In the middle of your
    table, on easel paper, create clusters of ideas
    that are similar.
  • Name each cluster.

11
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Developed by the Governors Commission on Quality
    Teaching, 2007
  • Based on research about effective teaching
  • Adopted by the Alabama State Board of Education

12
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • A framework for thinking about quality teaching
  • Provides a common reference, shared vocabulary
  • Relates to ALL levels of teaching (K-12) and ALL
    content areas

13
Uses of Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Teacher preparation
  • Supervising student teachers
  • Teacher recruitment and hiring
  • Mentoring beginning teachers
  • Structuring professional development

14
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 1 Content Knowledge
  • Standard 2 Teaching and Learning
  • Standard 3 Literacy
  • Standard 4 Diversity
  • Standard 5 Professionalism

15
AQTS JigsawCooperative Learning
  • At your table, number off from 1 to 5.
  • Your number matches the standard to which you are
    assigned to learn more so that you can share with
    other members of your group.

16
AQTS Jigsaw
  • In your expert groups,
  • Review your assigned standard.
  • Read the description, the rationale, and the key
    indicators.
  • Create a definition (in your own words) for this
    standard.
  • What would it look like? What evidence would you
    look for? How would you know if it is in place?
  • Look for sample ideas you generated in the last
    activity.
  • Be prepared to present to the other members of
    your original table group.

17
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 1 Content Knowledge

Teachers have deep knowledge of the academic
discipline they are teaching, facilitate
students understanding of the subject, and know
the state standards and district curriculum for
subjects taught.
18
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 1 Content Knowledge
  • Academic Discipline(s)
  • Curriculum

19
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 2 Teaching and Learning

In a classroom environment conducive to learning,
teachers use best practice instructional and
assessment strategies appropriate to the students.
20
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 2 Teaching and Learning
  • Human Development
  • Organization and Management
  • Learning Environment
  • Instructional Strategies
  • Assessment

21
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 3 Literacy

Teachers model and teach effective oral and
written communication, integrating basic reading,
math and technology as appropriate.
22
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 3 Literacy
  • Oral and Written Communication
  • Reading
  • Mathematics
  • Technology

23
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 4 Diversity

Teachers differentiate instruction in ways that
exhibit a deep understanding of cultural, ethnic,
and social backgrounds second language learning
special needs and learning styles.
24
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 4 Diversity
  • Cultural, Ethnic and Social Diversity
  • Language Diversity
  • Special Needs
  • Learning Styles
  • General

25
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 5 Professionalism

Teachers engage in continuous learning and
self-improvement through collaboration with
colleagues.
26
Alabama Quality Teaching Standards
  • Standard 5 Professionalism
  • Collaboration
  • Continuous, Lifelong Professional Learning
  • Alabama-Specific Improvement Initiatives
  • School Improvement
  • Ethics
  • Local, State, Federal Laws and Policies

27
Checking For Understanding
  • Numbered Heads Together
  • Number off at your table from 1-5.
  • Use your handout, Standards in Action.

28
Checking For Understanding
  • As I direct your attention to a statement, get
    with others in your home group to decide To
    which of the standards does this relate most
    closely?
  • Be ready to respond and give a rationale for your
    selection.

29
Mentoring Mission
  • To help support beginning teachers as they
    develop the skills and confidence to become
    quality teachers

30
Why Mentors?
  • Induction for beginning teachers relates to
    support, guidance, and orientation programs can
    be in the form of classes, workshops, seminars,
    or mentors
  • Since 1990s, mentoring has become the dominant
    form of induction.

31
Some of the Facts Beginning Teachers
  • In teaching, new entrants, fresh out of
    professional training, assume the exact same
    responsibilities as 20-year veterans
  • Support for Beginning Teachers must Become a
    Top Priority Working Toward Excellence A
    Newsletter of the Best Practices Center, Fall
    2001.

32
Some of the Facts Beginning Teachers
  • Attrition in the first five years among beginning
    teachers is between 40-50
  • --Ingersoll and Kralik, 2004

33
Some of the Facts Beginning Teachers
  • Initiation of new teachers has traditionally been
    sink or swim
  • In a survey of 1st and 2nd year teachers in
    Alabama
  • lt 40 said they had received help in
    establishing relationships with colleagues and
    managing class time
  • gt 80 wanted assistance through professional
    development and an assigned mentor teacher
    (2000)

34
Final Word
  • Read the excerpt from Support for Beginning
    Teachers Must Become a Top Priority.
  • As you read, select three ideas that are
    interesting or seem important to you. Underline
    or highlight them so you can refer to them later.
  • Be prepared to talk about why you think they are
    important.

35
The Final Word
  • In your group
  • Select a facilitator, who will keep your group on
    trackfollowing the protocol.
  • Select a timekeeper, who has a watch with a
    second-hand and can multi-task (listen and talk
    and keep track of time.)
  • Select a volunteer, who agrees to introduce an
    idea first.

36
The Final Word
  • The protocol
  • One person volunteers to lead offtaking up to
    three minutes to talk about one idea.
  • Moving in clockwise fashion, every member, in
    turn, responds for up to one minute.
  • The opening speaker has one minute for the final
    word.
  • Repeat the above process for the next person.

37
The Final Word
  • Listen actively.
  • Be open to what each speaker is saying.
  • Take notes.
  • Speak only when it is your turn.

38
Debrief the Final Word
  • Why might we have used this process rather than
    (1) lecture or (2) read and discuss at your
    tables?

39
Mentoring Mission
  • What can we do to ease the difficulties that
    beginning teachers face during the first year?

40
Lets think together
  • About the major challenges that beginning
    teachers will face this year. It may help for
    you to remember your first year as a teacherand
    the feelings and difficulties that you confronted
    at that time.
  • Individually, make a list of the challenges that
    you expect teachers will face. List at least
    three.

Challenges Faced by Beginning Teachers
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________

41
Give OneGet One
  • Stand up and find a partner.
  • Listen as your partner shares one of his or her
    ideas. If you dont have that, add it to your
    list.
  • Be sure to share at least one idea with your
    partner that is new to his or her list.
  • If you both have the same items, create a new
    idea that you can both add.

42
Give OneGet One
  • Move to a new partner every time the leader calls
    time. From each partner, get a new idea to add
    to your listand give one from your list.

43
What Help Do New Teachers Need?
44
Alabama Teacher Mentoring Program Spheres of
Activity
Classroom
Personal
School
45
Application of the Spheres of Activity
Classroom
Personal
School
46
Expectations for Mentoring Say Something
  • Find your handout, Expectations for Participants
    in Alabama Teacher Mentoring Program.
  • Now find a partner.
  • Read through the first section, Every new
    teacher in Alabama can expect to
  • When you finish, turn to your partner and say
    something about what you read listen as they say
    something to you about what every new teacher in
    Alabama can expect.

47
Expectations for Mentoring
  • Now read the second section, Every teacher
    mentor in Alabama can expect to
  • Say something to your partner about what you
    read listen as they say something to you about
    what every teacher mentor in Alabama can expect.

48
Expectations for Mentoring What is Ongoing
Training?
  • Mentor consultants (from the Regional Inservice
    Centers) and mentor liaisons (from the LEA) will
    provide training to mentor teachers.

49
Expectations for Mentoring What is Ongoing
Training?
  • Network of learners
  • Participating in face-to-face training
    opportunities
  • Sharing experiences
  • Learning from and supporting one another
  • Staying current and on target with
    responsibilities

50
Expectations for Mentoring What is Ongoing
Training?
  • Proposed sessions
  • Roles, Responsibilities and Relationships (1 day,
    August)
  • Coaching for a High-Performance Learning
    Environment (4 hours, October)
  • Assessing for Increased Student Achievement (3
    hours, December)
  • Increasing Student Engagement (3 hours, February)
  • Connecting Students to the Content (3 hours,
    April/May)

51
Expectations for Mentoring What is Ongoing
Training?
  • Network of learnersthrough the internet
  • On-line support post questions and concerns
  • Dialogue through web-postings
  • To stay in touch with colleagues
  • To share ideas
  • To connect with and share resources

52
Expectations for Mentoring What is Ongoing
Training?
  • PPTs to be posted on ALEX for viewing by mentors,
    beginning teachers, and school administrators on
    the following proposed topics
  • Alabama Quality Teaching Standards, (September)
  • Resources for Classroom Management (November)
  • Formative Assessment (November/December)
  • Assessment of Mentor Program (December)
  • Best Practices (February/March)
  • Summative Evaluation of the Mentor Program (May)

53
Alabama Teacher Mentoring Program Spheres of
Activity
Classroom
Personal
School
54
Beginning Teachers Emotions During Their First
Year
Eagerness
Reflection
Endurance
Hope
Renewal
Distress
Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan
Feb Mar Apr May Jun July
55
Beginning Teachers Emotions During Their First
Year
Eagerness
Reflection
Endurance
Hope
Renewal
Distress
Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan
Feb Mar Apr May Jun July
56
As a mentor,
  • the best thing we can do is to establish a
    relationship built on trust.

57
Consider this
  • Too often in the process of change, we have
    neglected the personal and interpersonal factors
    that contribute to the motivation to learn and
    the willingness to explore new ideas and new ways
    of being. First among these is trust, the sense
    that the relationship between knower and learner
    is solid, dependable, and honest.
  • Frances OConnell Rust and Helen Freidus

58
What characterizes a relationship built on trust?
  • Individually, generate at least three ideas of
    your own on a piece of paper.

59
Silent Sharing
  • Share your ideas silently by writingone person
    at a timeone of your ideas on the easel paper in
    the middle of your table.
  • Continue to go around the table until all ideas
    are exhausted.
  • Quickly look at the ideas expressed at other
    tables. What are the commonalities that you
    notice?

60
Trust Mistrust
  • Open
  • Supportive
  • Willing to Risk
  • Respectful
  • Genuine
  • Cooperative
  • Problem Centered
  • Accepting Warm
  • Dependable
  • Closed
  • Controlling
  • Unwilling to Risk
  • Disrespectful
  • Hypocritical
  • Competitive
  • Solution Minded
  • Rejecting Cold
  • Capricious

61
Trust Its Multiple Dimensions
  • AuthenticityBe yourself.
  • HonestySpeak the truth.
  • ListeningListen to understand, not to judge
  • ConfidentialityKeep confidences.
  • NOT putting another downAcknowledge and build on
    strengths.
  • NOT trying to take overRemember your role.

62
Authenticity
  • Authenticity is simply being honest with
    ourselves and being direct and honest with
    others. For whatever the reason, authenticity
    continues to be rare in our workplaces. Most
    interactions carry an element of role play,
    positioning, and strategy. All are reflections
    of our wish to control our environment and the
    people in it. What is difficult about
    authenticity is that it is a high-risk strategy.
    It swims upstream in a culture of control.

63
Alabama Teacher Mentoring Program Spheres of
Activity
Classroom
Personal
School
64
Develop Supportive Relationships Among All
Members of the School Community
Beginning Teacher
All school staff
Principal
Mentor
65
Plan a Session with the Principal about the ATM
66
Prepare an Elevator Speech
  • What would you want to say to your facultyin two
    minutes or lessabout the mentoring program and
    about their role in helping to provide a
    successful year for the beginning teachers in
    your school?
  • Work with your table group to plan an elevator
    speechsomething you could say in the time it
    takes to ride an elevator from the lobby to the
    10th floor.

67
How can we help bridge the gap between
a teacher of students?
a student of teaching
and
68
Communication Strategies
  • Ordinary, everyday habits of communication wont
    work as a mentor
  • We need extraordinary skills of listening,
    rephrasing, clarifying, and prompting thinking

69
Areas of Communication Skills
  • General Communications
  • Listening to understand
  • Questioningto clarify, to elicit thinking, to
    promote reflection
  • Giving feedback
  • Communications Specific to Observing
  • Setting a focus
  • Observing, collecting data--evidence vs. opinion
    (non-evaluative)
  • Conferencinggiving feedback, stimulating
    reflection

70
Listening
  • One of the best ways to persuade others is with
    your earsby listening to them.
  • --Dean Rusk

71
Listening
  • It turns out that most people want less advice
    but more opportunity to explore their own
    thinking with a caring coach who is paying
    attention.

  • --Patty McManus

72
Listening
  • A committed listener helps people think more
    clearly, work through unresolved issues, and
    discover the solutions they have inside them.
    This often involves listening beyond what people
    are saying to the deeply held beliefs and
    assumptions that are shaping their actions.
  • --Robert Hargrove

73
How to Listen
  • Stop talkingto others and to yourself
  • Imagine the others point of view
  • Look, act, and be interested
  • Observe for the meaning behind the words
  • Dont interrupt. Wait until they finish and
    pause at least three seconds (they may have more
    to say!)
  • Speak only affirmatively while listening
  • Paraphrase to ensure understanding
  • Stop talkingthis is first, middle, and last!

74
Questioning
  • You cannot teach a man anything. You can only
    help him discover it within himself.
  • --Galileo Galilei

75
Mentor as Questioner
  • Reflectiveto engage a person in thinking about
    his or her perception and understanding to cause
    deep thinking about an issue
  • Probingto get behind the thinking of a person
    to cause them to go deeper in their thinking or
    be more explicit
  • Clarifyingto ensure a common understanding of
    what is said
  • Elicitingto get more information, Can you tell
    me more about that?

76
Examples of Reflective Questions
  • Tell me about
  • Did you notice?
  • What problems did you come across today?
  • How are you planning to address this?
  • What if?
  • I wonder?
  • How did you reach this conclusion?
  • Why do you think?
  • Talk to me about what success might look like.
  • Lets assume for a minute that
  • Imagine that you
  • What might be the relationship between ____ and
    ____?

77
Probing Questions or Comments
  • To clarify,
  • What do you mean when you say. . . ?
  • Help me get behind your thinking. . .
  • Paraphrase Let me see if Ive got this right.
    (Provide summary in own words.)
  • To elicit more information
  • Can you give me an example of. . .?
  • Talk about a time when you were able to . . .
  • Say more about . .
  • Youve told me about how you hope to engage the
    students in learning fractions. Now talk about
    how you will know if that strategy is successful.

78
Reflective Dialogue
  • Purpose
  • To better understand the strengths you bring to
    the role of mentoring
  • To identify skills and strategies that promote
    reflection

79
Individual Reflection Personal and
Professional Strengths
  • In the left column of your handout, write about
    the work you imagine you will be doing as a
    mentor.

80
Individual Reflection Personal and
Professional Strengths
  • In the right column, reflect on what, in your
    personal and professional life, has prepared you
    to perform this role effectively. That is, what
    strengths do you bring to this mentoring role?
    How did you acquire them?

81
  • Form groups of three. Two people will engage in
    a reflective dialogue while the other observes.
  • Interviewer
  • Responder
  • Observer

82
Roles
  • Interviewer Pose reflective questions to
    surface your partners understanding of the role
    of mentor as well as the strengths that he or she
    brings to the role.
  • Your role is to listen intently, probing
    gently when necessary.

83
Roles
  • Reflector Talk to the interviewer openly about
    your perceptions of the job of mentor teacherand
    how you see your own strengths helping you in
    this challenging role.
  • Reflect deeply about how your past
    experiencesboth personal and professionalhave
    enabled you to perform this job well.

84
Roles
  • Observer Look for evidence of deep reflective
    thought. What did you notice that facilitated
    reflection?
  • A. Verbal What did the interviewer say that
    seemed to prompt reflective thought?
  • B. Non-verbal What did the interviewer do
    that seemed to facilitate reflection?

85
Debrief Reflective Dialogue
  • In your triads, think about the following
  • What kinds of questions were most effective in
    promoting reflection?
  • What other factors contributed to the reflection?
  • What conclusions can you draw about reflective
    questioning?

86
Facilitating Reflection
  • What did you learn from this activity that you
    might be able to transfer to your work as a
    mentor?

87
Making a Commitment
  • Based on the discussion today, what new ideas or
    affirmations of old ones do you have? Write down
    two or three.
  • What are you willing to commit to do with your
    beginning teacher?
  • What questions do you have?

88
References
  • Block, Peter. Flawless Consulting A Guide to
    Getting Your Expertise Used. San Francisco
    Jossey-Bass. 2000.
  • Chartier, Myron R. The 1991 Annual Developing
    Human Resources, edited by J. William Pfeiffer.
    San Diego, CA University Associates. 1991.
  • Hargrove, Robert. Masterful Coaching
    Extraordinary Results by Impacting People and the
    Way They Think and Work Together
  • Ingersoll, R. and Kralik, J. The Impact of
    Mentoring on Teacher Retention What the
    Research Says. Denver Education Commission of
    the States. 2004.
  • Marzano, Robert J. What Works in Schools
    Translating Research into Action. Alexandria, VA
    ASCD. 2003.
  • Moir, Ellen. The Stages of a Teachers First
    Year. A Better Beginning Supporting and
    Mentoring New Teachers. Ed. By Marge Scherer.
    Arlington, VA ASCD. 1999.
  • Rust, Frances OConnell and Freidus, Helen.
    Guiding School Change The Role and Work of
    Change Agents. Teachers College Press, 2001.
  • Senge, Peter and others. The Fifth Discipline
    Fieldbook Strategies and Tools for Building a
    Learning Organization. New York Doubleday.
    1994.
  • Support for Beginning Teachers Must Become a
    Top Priority. Working Toward Excellence A
    Newsletter of the Best Practices Center. Fall
    2001.
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