TOUR 21-CRUISE SALES AND MANAGEMENT

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TOUR 21-CRUISE SALES AND MANAGEMENT

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Title: TOUR 21-CRUISE SALES AND MANAGEMENT


1
Tour 21cruise sales and management
  • Professor Chori T.Infante

2
HISTORY OF CRUISELINES
  • 1816- Black Ball Line Liverpool packets, First
    shipping Company to offer regularly service from
    the United States to England .
  • 1830- steamships were introduced and dominated
    the transatlantic market of passenger and mail
    transport.

3
History of cruise lines
  • July 4, 1840- Britannia , the first ship under
    the Cunard name, left Liverpool with a cow on
    board to supply fresh milk to the passengers on
    the 14-day transatlantic crossing.
  • 1844- PO Cruises started ,popularly advent of
    pleasure cruises known as Peninsular Steam
    Navigation Co.begun.
  • 1850s and 1860s -a dramatic improvement in the
    quality of the voyage for passengers. Ships began
    to cater solely to passengers.
  • 1867, Mark Twain was a passenger on the first
    cruise originating in America, recorded his
    experiences in the book Innocents Abroad

4
History of cruise lines
  • 1880s - leisurely pleasure cruises
    transatlantic travel. Ships began to carry
    immigrants to the U.S in steerage class.
  • 1887- POSH word coined Port Out, Starboard
    Home
  • Early 20th century -superliner was developed and
    Germany led the market in development of floating
    hotels.
  • Mauritania and the Lusitania- owned by Cunard
    Line of England.(started the tradition of
    dressing for dinner and the romance of the
    voyage)

5
History of cruise lines
  • White Star Line, owned by J.P. Morgan, introduced
    the most luxurious passenger ships ever seen in
    the Olympic (complete with swimming pool and
    tennis court)
  •  Titanic. Space and passenger comfort now took
    precedence over speed in the design of these
    ships.
  • 1900- Golden Age of cruising started
  • 1912 sinking of Titanic devastated the White
    Star Line.

6
History of cruise lines
  • 1916- Brittanic the sister ship of Titanic sank.
  • World War I-Leisure cruising ceased. Ships were
    converted to cruise ships including Cunard Ship
    Lines Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth.
  • 1934-Cunard bought out White Star the resulting
    company name, Cunard White Star. With a total of
    25 vessels.

7
Cunard white star
8
History of cruise lines
  • World War II- Cruise liners again were converted
    into troop carriers and all transatlantic
    cruising ceased until after the war.
  • European lines then reaped the benefits of
    transporting refugees to America and Canada, and
    business travelers and tourists to Europe.
  • The first non-stop flight to Europe in 1958,
    however, marked the ending of transatlantic
    business for ocean liners. Passenger ships were
    sold and lines went bankrupt from the lack of
    business.

9
History of cruise lines
  • European lines then reaped the benefits of
    transporting refugees to America and Canada, and
    business travelers and tourists to Europe.
  • 1958- the advent of the first commercial non-stop
    trans-Atlantic flight to Europe, cruising
    continued to decline. Lines went bankrupt and
    passenger ships were sold.
  • 1960- Modern cruising emerged,
  • 1977-1986-Cruise ships came laden with amenities
    and entertainment options, immortalised in the
    hit television series The Love Boat, which and
    starred Princess Cruises.
  • 1990s- development in the cruise industry
    continued, emerge of several cruiselines.

10
EVOLUTION OF THE CRUISE LINE
1800s
1900s
EARLY
INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
STEAMSHIP
CRUISE LINE
OCEANLINER
11
History of cruise lines
  • 2010-divergence between companies building larger
    and larger ships . Companies like Royal
    Caribbean have been busy building megaliners
    capable of carrying up to 3,000 passengers. These
    vessels continue to add more and more amenities,
    such as virtual reality gaming rooms, ice-skating
    rinks, and multi-story shopping centers, as well
    as special services
  • 2012-Allure of the Seas was build..
  • 2014- Quantum of the Seas was build
  • 2015-Harmony of the Seas was build., several
    cruiseline continued to be build.

12
Motivations why people cruise
  1. DEGREE OF INCLUSIVENESS
  2. FACTORS AFFETCING THE PRICE OF THE CRUISE

13
MOTIVATIONS
  • WHY DO YOU WANT TO CRUISE?

14
WHY DO PEOPLE WANT TO CRUISE?
  •  Party time
  • Family togetherness
  • No housekeeping
  • Dining and trying new foods.
  • Get unplugged for a week.
  • Gambling
  • History.  This can be on an anywhere-in-the-world
    cruise
  • Get back in shape
  • New or adventure experiences.
  • See the world without flying! 
  • Business
  • You know what you are paying for
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15
Motivations on why people cruise?
  • http//www.cruisemaven.com/top-10-reasons-for-a-cr
    uise-vacation

16
Degree of inclusiveness
  • ALWAYS OR ALMOST ALWAYS INCLUDED
  • Stateroom accommodations
  • Stateroom amenities
  • Meals
  • Entertainment
  • Onboard activities
  • Ship transportation (tenders)

17
Degree of inclusiveness
  • Accommodations. Certain beverages, entertainment
  • Airfares, shore excursions, gratuities, alcoholic
    beverages,
  • Port charges, government fees, valet services,
    transfers, and taxes
  • Never included are meals offshore, departure
    port,shopping,gambling,phone calls, medical
    services, babysitting,massage, hairstyle, spa,
    insurance.The ship usually sell trip
    cancellations,interruption, lost damaged luggage
    insurance.

18
DEGREE OF INCLUSIVENESS
  • SOMETIMES INCLUDED, SOMETIMES NOT.
  • USUALLY NOT INCLUDED.
  • Airfares
  • Port charges
  • Government fees
  • Taxes
  • Transfers
  • Shore excursion
  • Gratuities
  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Optional activities
  • Laundry

19
Factors affecting the price of the cruise
  1. The higher the deck the stateroom is on, the
    higher the price.
  2. Outside staterooms (which generally have windows)
    are more expensive than inside stateroom (
    staterooms with window are usually called ocean
    view).
  3. Larger staterooms in the ship are usually more
    expensive than the smaller one.
  4. Staterooms with balconies generally cost high
    than those without.
  5. Staterooms with obstruction , usually cost lesser
    than those without any obstruction on the outside
    ocean view.

20
Factors affecting the price of the cruise
  • 6. Booking 6 months or even earlier gives a good
    discount.
  • 7. Last minute sale, when the ships not really
    fully booked, gives sales.
  • 8. Third or fourth person sharing in the room,
    will have lesser price.
  • 9. Seasonability- when off season cruises are
    less priced.(high season or low season)
  • 10. Repositioning Cruises
  • 11. Past passenger sale or Alumni Sale.

21
Styles of the ship
  1. DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHIPS
  2. CLASSIC VS. MODERN SHIPS
  3. SIZING SHIPS

22
  • CLASSIC OCEANLINER-epitomizes the Golden Age of
    Cruising. Sleek,streamlines , and build to knife
    their way to the open oceans.

23
  • CONTEMPORARY CRUISE SHIPS-speed is no longer a
    prime consideration. tapered, knife like hulls,
    nice staterooms, bigger , another term is
    megaships

24
  • SMALL SHIPS-smaller which accommodates at least
    200 passengers, more intimate cruise ships,
    miniature cruise ships.

25
  • MASTED SAILING SHIP- they have must and sails and
    generally powered by wind. In some cases, there
    are cases when they are technologically
    computered, controlling the sails. The ships have
    motors in case the wind died downs.

26
  • RIVERBOATS-paddlewheeleroften modeled after the
    great steamboats oto explore Americas
    greatrivers. This is to experience legendary
    great rivers, which Mark Twain did.

27
  • BARGES- flat-bottomed boat for carrying freight,
    typically on canals and rivers, either under its
    own power or towed by another.

28
  • FERRIES-a ferry is a merchant vessel used to
    carry passengers, and sometimes vehicles and
    cargo as well, across a body of water.
    Most ferries operate regular return .

29
Multipurpose ships
  • MULTIPURPOSE SHIPS- vessel (MPV) is a seagoing
    ship that is built for the carriage of a wide
    range of cargoes. Examples of these cargoes are
    wood, steel, building  cargoes.

30
...
  • MiscellaneousYatch-is a recreational ship. The
    term originates from the Dutch word jacht hunt
    and was originally defined as a light fast
    sailing vessel used by Dutch navy to pursue
    pirates and other transgressions.

31
CLASSIC VS. MODERN SHIPS
  • Older, Classic Ships
  • Newer, Modern ships
  • Much use of wood, brass other natural
    materials.
  • Modest-sized public areas.
  • Can travel up to 30 knots.
  • Nostalgic appearance.
  • Hulls have deep drafts some ports are.
  • Small windows.
  • More obstructed stateroom views.
  • Synthetic materials more common.
  • Large public areas(atriums, showrooms, malls)
  • Travel at 20-25 knots.
  • Modern appearance.
  • Hulls have shallow drafts ports more accessible.
  • Larger windows.
  • Fewer obstructed stateroom views.

32
Classic vs. modern ships
  • Older, Classic Ships
  • Newer, Modern ships
  • Pedestrian flow through ship sometimes awkward.
  • Stateroom verandas more rare.
  • Smaller swimming pools.
  • Promenade decks common.
  • Many different-sized staterooms staterooms are
    relatively large rooms.
  • Easy Pedestrian flow through views.
  • Stateroom verandas more likely.
  • Larger swimming pools.
  • promenade decks less common.
  • More standardized stateroom size some staterooms
    may be small.

33
PUBLIC SPACES
34
Public spaces
35
private SPACES
36
staterooms
37
Anatomy of the ship
  • READING A DECK PLAN

38
ANATOMY OF A SHIP
39
ANATOMY OF THE SHIP
40
READING A DECK PLAN
41
POPULAR CRUISE LINE DESTINATIONS
  1. CRUISELINE DESTINATIONS
  2. TYPE OF CRUISES

42
Popular cruise destinations
43
CRUISING NORTH AMERICA
  • ALASKA
  • Sitka
  • Juneau
  • Skagway
  • Glacier Bay

44
THE NORTHEAST
  • One of the famous was the Fall River Line, made
    up of elegant steamers , that serve ass
    transportation between England and New York City
  • Newport- Rhode Island-site of Americas greatest
    mansion
  • Boston, Massachusetts-Cradle of Liberty in the
    USA
  • Bar Harbor, Maine- gateway to gateway Acadia
    National Park.

45
The northeast
BAR HARBOR,MAINE
BOSTON,MASSACHUSSET
S
NEWPORT,RHODE ISLAND
46
CRUISING NORTH AMERICA
  • Saint John-New Brunswick
  • Halifax- Nova Scotia-two key cities of the
    Canadian Maritime Provinces.
  • Quebec City, Quebec- a little bit of seventeenth
    century, France right here in N. America
  • The Mississippi River and its Tributaries

47
CRUISING NORTH AMERICA
SAINT JOHN
HALIFAX,NOVA SCOTIA
QUEBEC, QUEBEC CITY
48
Mexicos Pacific Coast
  • Cabo San Lucas-southern tip of Baja
  • Mazatlan-dramatic golf course
  • Puerto Vallarta-fishing paradise in Mexico
  • Acapulco- Mexicos grand old resort

49
Mexicos Pacific Coast
CABO, SAN LUCAS
MAZATLAN
PUERTO VALLARTA
ACAPULCO
50
Eastern Caribbean
  • Bahamas
  • The Eastern Caribbean
  • The US Virgin Islands
  • The British Virgin Islands
  • St Martin/ St. Maarten
  • Antigua
  • Guadaloupe and Martinique
  • St. Vincent, Granada, and St. Kitts

51
CARIBBEAN-FAVORITE PORT
52
Southern Caribbean
  • The ABC Island
  • Trinidad
  • Barbados

53
Western Caribbean
  • Cancun
  • Cayman Islands
  • Jamaica
  • Haiti
  • The Dominican Republic

54
Different type of cruisers
55
DIAL A CRUISER
  •  This is the most common type of cruiser we've
    seen in our travels. They are usually of
    retirement age and have a pretty well appointed
    vessel in the 40-44 foot range. Some sold all
    their land-based assets to live aboard
    indefinitely but most have some sort of home
    ashore. Their uniform is decidedly "boaty"

56
 Salty Sea Dog
  • This is usually the old man in the anchorage who
    has sailed thousands and thousands of miles,
    usually alone. He is incredibly wise, perhaps a
    tiny-bit sketchy and has captivating stories from
    all over the world. His skin is perma-tanned and
    leathery and he typically has a beard. 

57
 Minimalist
  •   These cruisers scoff at anything and everything
    that will make their lives more comfortable at
    sea (more to fix, right?). A windlass? Psh. We've
    got muscle power!! A watermaker? Ugh. We wash and
    clean in the ocean!

58
Sailing Athlete 
  • This cruiser can be spotted a mile away by all
    the gear they have aboard. Kayaks, SUPs, and
    surfboards take up every space on deckt

59
Hardcore Cruiser
  • These cruisers are HARD CORE. They're similar to
    the minimalist but have more expertise. One or
    both usually carry a captain's license and
    they've traveled many miles at sea. They know
    things like celestial navigation, navigate with a
    hand bearing compass, and sail in extreme
    latitudes in extreme conditions.

60
By-the-Book Cruiser
  • This cruiser is new to cruising and has read
    every single book, blog, and article on the
    subject.. They will spout out theoretical
    information at an alarming rate and act like they
    know everything despite having sailed very little
    .

61
Awkward Single-hander 
  • These guys (because - sorry ladies - they are
    usually men) have a story, but you don't really
    know it. They tend to keep to themselves and, if
    they don't, conversation can be a little awkward
    since they are so used to being on their own.  

62
Jack-of-all-Trades
  •  This is the helpful cruiser in the anchorage who
    can do it all. "just in case". These folks are
    usually some of the most popular in the anchorage
    and are usually of the "learn by doing" variety.

63
Young and the Restless
  • They are the young cruisers, usually during the
    spring break we have several of theses cruisers.
    because they're having the time of their lives.
    No matter what, there is always plenty of time
    aboard. They get in with the local populous by
    frequenting their bars, smoking their pot and -
    in general - having a total blast.

64
Dreamer Gone Awry 
  • These are the cruisers who had the dream, made it
    happen, and then discovered they actually don't
    really like cruising at all. If they are a
    couple, they are often at each others' throats
    and they usually look and sound a little forlorn.
    They complain a lot about local food, local
    people and "island time".

65
 Wealthy cruiser
  •  They do exist - but they are few and far between
    in the cruising community. These folks usually
    come from a powerful background (doctor, lawyer
    CEO, entrepreneur) Some are retired but most
    still have a business or endeavor.

66
Naked European
  • The name says it all. They are usually French and
    have crossed at least one ocean. These folks are
    usually very good cruisers and wise expenditures,
    and - because they have been at it so long (and
    are European) - they have shed all inhibition and
    have no problem showering completely naked off
    the back of their boat in plain view

67
Family Afloat 
  •  These folks are very easy to spot and more
    common than you think. Their two or three
    tow-headed kids are perfectly tan and can be
    heard screeching and playing on the cruise all
    day long. They swing from the halyards, jump off
    the boom, and sail their little dinghies. They
    have no fear and an innate sense of adventure.
    The children are well spoken, imaginative and
    free to go around.

68
Loner cruiser
  • These cruisers want to be on their own. They
    prefer secluded , turn their noses up at things
    like "buddy boating" (herd mentalitybad
    decisions) and abhor pot-lucks and any other type
    of cruiser-y gathering. They intentionally avoid
    crowds, hardly ever stay at ports but are
    touristy

69
Working Cruiser
  • This cruiser is working as they go. They might
    run an internet business, or charter - whatever
    it is, they are making money. They usually have
    decent, well equipped personality (because they
    can afford them), and will indulge in meals
    ashore and happy hours more than the others
    because they actually have a reliable income,
    unlike most others who are living off of savings.

70
Happy to Be Here Cruiser
  • These are the ones that most of us can identify
    with. These folks are just so stinking happy to
    live this life. Every place has something to
    offer, there is always something new to be
    learned and every day brings a new adventure. The
    sights and sounds take their breath away and they
    revel in the simple delights of a lifting.

71
CRUISE VACATION EXPERIENCE
  • PRE AND POST CRUISE PACKAGE

72
PRE CRUISE PACKAGE
  • Clients will sometimes travel to their cruise
    embarkation point and go directly to the ship.
  • Often, though, theyll spend a day or more
    exploring the port.
  • The simplest of Pre-Cruise experience is the
    air/sea package.

73
POST CRUISE PACKAGE
  • Post-cruise packages are exactly like pre-cruise
    ones.
  • Theyre sold the same way.
  • They represent the same possible components,
    options and experiences.
  • Some passengers prefer to do a package before
    their cruise, others after, still others before
    and after.

74
CRUISE ITINERARIES
  • Two major itinerary types exist Round-trip or
    Circle (the vessel leaves from and returns to the
    same port) and One-way (the cruise begins at one
    port and finishes at another.)
  • Round-trip itineraries tend to predominate at
    mass-market destination such as the Caribbean.
  • Cruise lines that serve mass-market customers and
    destinations will use a one-way itinerary when
    logistics dictate that they should.

75
ACTIVITIES ONBOARD THE SHIP
  • Intermediary Port Stops and Shore Excursions
  • A Day in Port, A Day in Sea

76
Intermediary Port Stops and Shore Excursions
  • They may purchase a shore excursion through the
    cruise line.
  • They may buy it through a shore excursion
    company.
  • They may buy a tour or activity from vendors who
    usually await them at or near the dock.
  • They may simply explore the port and its environs
    on their own.
  • They may elect to stay onboard to relax, get some
    sun and feel like they have ship almost all to
    themselves.
  • In a few rare cases (very upscale lines or
    river-based ships), some or all of the shore
    excursions are included in the cruise price.

77
A DAY IN PORT
  • Go ashore
  • Go on shore excursion trips
  • Stay onboard the ship

78
A day at sea
  • Shipboard newspaper
  • Breakfast
  • Shipboard activities
  • Deck games
  • Exercise
  • Bingo
  • Theater
  • Port Lecture
  • Shore excursion Sign up

79
departure
  • Ship departure on the embarkation port
  • Dinner
  • First Seating- the earlier of two meals
  • Second Seating- the later of two meals
  • Open Seating- passenger sit were they wish
  • Dinner to be followed by entertainment

80
LAST NIGHT AND THE FOLLOWING DAY
  • Packing
  • Last dinner onboard the ship
  • Gratuity giving
  • Fill up customs form and comment card
  • Early breakfast
  • Disembarkation

81
Categories of excursions
  • Shore excursions come in every size, shape and
    theme. They can be divided into three broad
    categories
  • Sightseeing Excursions- a group of people on a
    motorcoach, train, submarine ride and walking
    tour.
  • Sports Excursions- golf, tennis, snorkeling and
    many more.
  • Miscellaneous Excursions- shore excursion, to a
    legendary shopping area or to a world-class
    museum.

82
REASONS FOR A CRUISE
  • A cruise is a hassle free vacation
  • A cruise takes you away from it all
  • Youre pampered like nowhere else.
  • Your can do it all or nothing at all.
  • You can sample a broad geographic area.
  • A cruise is something new.
  • Cruises offer a huge variety of events,
    activities and meals.
  • A cruise facilitates shopping.
  • 9. Its easy to make friends on a cruise.

83
REASONS FOR A CRUISE
  • Cruises lends themselves to groups.
  • A cruise is a romantic experience.
  • A cruise is a learning experience.
  • Theres a cruise that can satisfy virtually
    anyone.
  • Its a great way to celebrate a special
    event.Everybodys talking about how wonderful
    cruises are.
  • Cruises represent a safe travel experience.
  • Its a fabulous value for the money.
  • 18. You know what youre paying for in advance.

84
TIPPING GUIDELINES
  • Head Waiter- 0.25/guest/guest/day
  • Waiter- 3.75/guest/day
  • Assistant Waiter-2.00/guest/day
  • Stateroom Attendant- 5.00/guest/day
  • Bar-10 of the drink

85
JOB OPPoRTUNITIES IN A CRUISE LINE
  1. SEA BASED
  2. LAND BASED
  3. OFF SHORE

86
  • JOB OPPORTUNITIE

87
3 OCCUPATIONAL AREAS IN THE CRUISE LINE INDUSTRY
  • Sea-based Operations
  • Land-based Operations
  • Off Shore Operations

88
BENEFITS AND DRAWBACKS IN WORKING IN A SHIP
  • If you work on a cruise ship, you travel to many
    attractive destinations and see interesting
    places.
  • Although you spend most of the time aboard, there
    are some chances to go ashore and see the sites.
  • You meet people from all over the world and may
    forge some enduring friendships
  • You can earn quite a lot of money.
  • Since you do not have many opportunities to spend
    the money aboard, you can easily save most of it.
  • You get free accommodation and food. Moreover,
    you dont have to pay the utility bills

89
BENEFITS AND DRAWBACKS IN WORKING IN A SHIP
  • It is very difficult to get a job on a cruise
    liner.
  • You will work long hours 12 or 14 hours a day,
    7 days a week.
  • Accommodation for the cruise staff is very
    modest. On newer ships two people or, on older
    ships, even more share a small cabin and a
    bathroom. The crew cabins of the major cruise
    lines have televisions supplied. Most cabins are
    situated on one of the lower decks and they do
    not have windows. You have to give up some of
    your habits and get used to those of your
    roommates'.
  • You will be at sea in all types of weather.
  • If you suffer from severe sea-sickness, perhaps
    you should find a job ashore. Light forms of
    sea-sickness, however, are common amongst
    experienced seamen.

90
COMPARISON WITH HOTEL LAND BASED AND SEA BASED
WORK
  • Hotel Land Based
  • Sea Based
  • Achieve permanent friends
  • Goes home with the family
  • Go out after work.
  • Other responsibilities at home
  • Family to care or attend to your needs.
  • Bonding with love ones and relatives
  • With day off
  • Experience home sickness.
  • Away from family
  • Independent
  • Concentrated at your work
  • Saves rental, electric water and food
  • Better compensation
  • No permanent friends
  • No day off

91
PUBLIC HEALTH INSPECTION
  • Following is a guideline list in preparation for
    a P.H inspection.
  • Pre-inspect three days before arrival in port.
  • Prepare a repair list if necessary for the staff
    Captain or Chief Engineer.
  • Conduct a department Head Meeting to discuss the
    results of the pre-inspection in areas of
  • A Food handling
  • B Cleanliness of departments
  • C Personal hygiene
  • -Ensure that all refrigerators have thermometers.
  • -Ensure that there are no cleaning supplies in
    any department (except three step bucket system).
  • -                     This includes
  • A Brooms, Mops and Deck Brushes B
    Insecticide Sprays C Deck Soap

92
PUBLIC HEALTH INSPECTION
  • Sanitation Procedures
  • General cleanliness and sanitizing
  • Work tables/counters/shelves Clean and sanitize
    after each use. 
  •  Wash with hot water, rinse with clean water,
    sanitize with solution containing at
  • least 100 PPM chlorine but no more than 200
    PPM.  
  •  Leave surface damp to permit the chlorine to
    effectively sanitize and air dry.
  • Heat grinders/ slicers /meat choppers/mixers
    Schedule regular clean up after each
    use.Dissemble parts and clean them completely.
    Operating correctly.
  • Steam tables Clean outside, free of lime scale
    inside.
  • Coffee/tea urns Flush out, clean, delime, rinse
    cloth filters in cold water.
  • Stoves Grill and surrounding area Free 

93
BASIC INFORMATION IN PROCESSING OS SEAFARERS
DOCUMENTS AND CERTIFICATION
94
REQUIREMENTS ON BECOMING A SEAFARER
  • Medical Certificate (eent, cbc, psychological,
    p.e, gbi,dentistry, ecg)
  • Passport
  • SIRB or Seamans Book
  • Basic Training
  • Crowd Management
  • NBI Clearance

95
Trend profiles of the worlds famous cruiseline
companies
96
Income scheme onboard the ship
  • BASIC PAY
  • BASIC PAY WITH INCENTIVES
  • GRATUITY PAY
  • Basic pay with gratuity

97
Manning agencies in the philippines
98
Trend classification of the cruise line industry
99
Hope you enjoyed your lesson!
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