Ergonomics Guidelines Training for Nursing Homes - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Ergonomics Guidelines Training for Nursing Homes PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 79f80-YjA3M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Ergonomics Guidelines Training for Nursing Homes

Description:

Ergonomics Guidelines for Nursing Homes ... nursing homes. Recognize practical. solutions to address. problem jobs ... care to nursing home residents is ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:196
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 32
Provided by: lena8
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Ergonomics Guidelines Training for Nursing Homes


1
Ergonomics Guidelines for Nursing Homes
Recommendations for preventing and reducing
musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs)
Module 1
2
What this presentation covers
  • How to develop an ergonomics process to protect
    workers
  • Benefits of implementing an ergonomics process
  • Identify and analyze problem jobs in nursing
    homes
  • Recognize practical solutions to address problem
    jobs
  • Module 1 addresses problems involved with manual
    lifting and repositioning of residents.
  • Module 2 covers other activities.

3
What this presentation covers
Note The recommended solutions presented in
these slides are not intended to be an exhaustive
list, nor are they all expected to be used in any
given facility. The information represents a
range of available options that a facility can
consider using.
4
Introduction
Providing care to nursing home residents is
physically demanding work. Nursing home residents
often require assistance to walk, bathe, or
perform other normal daily activities.
Manual lifting and repositioning of residents
account for the majority of lost workday injuries
and illnesses in nursing homes.
  • Injury prevention efforts focused on manual
    lifting and repositioning methods may reduce
    work-related injuries and associated workers'
    compensation costs.

5
Introduction
Providing a safer and more comfortable work
environment can also result in additional
benefits to staff as well as residents
  • reduced staff turnover and associated training
    and administrative costs
  • reduced absenteeism
  • increased productivity
  • improved employee morale
  • increased resident comfort

6
What is Ergonomics?
Ergonomics is the science of fitting the job to
the worker. Ergonomics involves designing
equipment and work tasks to conform to the
capability of the worker.

7
Ergonomics Process
Develop a process for systematically addressing
ergonomics issues
  • Provide management support
  • Involve employees
  • Submit suggestions or concerns
  • Discuss workplace and work methods
  • Participate in design of work, equipment,
    procedures, and training
  • Evaluate equipment

8
Ergonomics Process
(Continued)
  • Identify problems
  • Use systematic methods
  • Implement solutions
  • Workplace modifications that
  • Eliminate hazards
  • and
  • Improve work environment

9
Ergonomics Process
(Continued)
  • Address reports of injury
  • Limit severity of injuries
  • Improve treatment of injuries
  • Minimize disability or permanent damage
  • Reduce claims and costs

10
Ergonomics Process
(Continued)
  • Provide training
  • recognize potential hazards
  • understand measures available to correct them
  • cover hazards found in each job
  • provide refresher training as needed
  • Evaluate ergonomic efforts

11
Benefits to Employees
What are the benefits of an effective ergonomics
program to employees?
  • Employee injuries reduced
  • Employee turnover declined
  • Absenteeism reduced
  • Productivity and morale increased
  • Compensation costs lowered

12
Benefits to Residents
What are the benefits of an effective ergonomics
program to residents?
  • Dignity
  • Independence
  • Security

13
Risk Factors in Nursing Homes
  • Nursing home residents often require assistance
    to walk, bathe, or perform other normal
    activities.
  • Risk factors that workers face when performing
    tasks associated with these activities include
  • Force
  • Repetition
  • Awkward postures

14
Risk Factors in Nursing Homes
  • Force

Amount of physical effort required to perform a
task or to maintain control of equipment or
tools (e.g., lifting, pushing, pulling, holding)
  • Examples of excessive force include
  • lifting or transferring heavy residents
  • unexpected or abrupt forceful motions
  • stopping resident falls or lifting them off the
    floor after a fall

15
Risk Factors in Nursing Homes
  • Repetition

Performing the same motion or series of motions
continually or frequently
  • Examples of repetitive activities include
  • repeated repositioning in bed
  • numerous transfers to and from beds, chairs, or
    commodes without rest breaks

16
Risk Factors in Nursing Homes
  • Awkward posture

Assuming positions that place stress on the
body (leaning, bending, twisting the torso while
lifting, reaching above shoulder height,
kneeling, squatting, etc.)
  • Examples of awkward posture are
  • dressing or undressing residents
  • providing in-bed medical care
  • repositioning or turning residents in beds

17
Exposure to Risk Factors
  • Excessive exposure to risk factors result in
    musculoskeletal disorders, which include
  • Low back pain
  • Sciatica
  • Rotator cuff injuries
  • Epicondylitis (elbow injuries)
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome

18
Identifying Problem Jobs
  • To obtain information, analyze and review
  • Injury and illness logs
  • Workers compensation reports
  • Accident and near-miss reports
  • Insurance company reports
  • Employee interviews
  • Workplace observations

19
Identifying Problems for Resident Lifting and
Repositioning
Resident Assessment
  • Level of assistance the resident requires
  • Size and weight
  • Ability and willingness to understand and
    cooperate
  • Rehabilitation plan
  • Medical conditions impacting choice of methods
  • Other factors

Factors to consider
20
Identifying Problems for Resident Lifting and
Repositioning
Resident Assessment Example
  • Fred is an 80 year old resident at a nursing
    home.
  • He weighs 156 pounds and is 59 tall.
  • He has dementia and a history of falls.
  • Although some days he is cooperative, on other
    days he is combative and fearful.
  • When he is cooperative, he can bear weight.
    Otherwise he resists standing.
  • He is to be out of bed every day in a chair.

21
Identifying Problems for Resident Lifting and
Repositioning
(Continued)
Resident Assessment Example
22
Identifying Problems for Resident Lifting and
Repositioning
(Continued)
Resident Assessment Example
  • Selection of equipment and method of transfer
  • Use full body sling with two caregivers

23
Finding Solutions to Problem Jobs
  • Engineering solutions
  • Involve a physical change to the way a job or
    task is conducted or physical modifications to
    the workplace.
  • Work practice solutions

Involve the way work is done and do not involve a
physical change to the workplace.
24
Factors That May Affect Solutions
  • Residents rehabilitation plan
  • Need to restore residents functional abilities
  • Medical contraindications
  • Emergency situations
  • Resident dignity and rights

25
Resident Lifting and Repositioning Solutions
Sit-to-Stand Lift
Floor-Based Sling Lift
26
Resident Lifting and Repositioning Solutions
(Continued)
Lateral Sliding Aid
Transfer Board
Electric Bed
27
Resident Lifting and Repositioning Solutions
(Continued)
Ambulation Assist
Weighing Scale with Ramp
28
Summary
In this module, you learned about the following
  • Ergonomics process
  • Provide management support
  • Involve employees
  • Identify problems
  • Implement solutions
  • Address reports of injuries
  • Provide training
  • Evaluate ergonomic efforts
  • Identifying and analyzing problem jobs in nursing
    homes
  • Recognizing practical solutions to address
    problem jobs

29
Resources
  • Guidelines for Nursing Homes
  • developed by the Occupational Safety and Health
    Administration (OSHA)

30
Resources
  • WISHA
  • http//www.lni.wa.gov/Safety/Topics/Ergonomics/def
    ault.asp
  • OSHA http//www.osha.gov/ergonomics/guidelines/nur
    singhome/index.html
  • NIOSH
  • http//www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/ergonomics/

31
  • Thank you for taking the time to learn about
    safety and health and how to prevent future
    injuries and illnesses.

?
About PowerShow.com