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Making Middle

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Went parasailing. 3. Southern. Regional. Education. Board. MMGW. Workshop Protocols. Scheduled Breaks ... Overview of the MMGW school improvement initiative ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Making Middle


1
Making Middle Grades Work Site Developmen
t Workshop New Ohio Sites February 6-7, 2007 Co
lumbus, Ohio

2
  • Introductions
  • Fact or Fiction
  • Born in Georgia
  • Drove a city bus
  • Went parasailing

3
Workshop Protocols
  • Scheduled Breaks
  • Biology breaks
  • Cell phones are turned off or on vibrate
  • Hand signal to stop discussions
  • Everyone participates
  • Respect for everyone
  • Start and end on time

4
Facilitation Parking Lot
SUGGESTIONS
QUESTIONS
CONCERNS
FOLLOW-UP
5
Workshop Objectives
  • Overview of the MMGW school improvement
    initiative goals, conditions and key practices
    (Planner Pages pp 2-4)
  • Review the essential framework components and
    2006 data
  • Analyze the status of school and classroom
    practices
  • Plan and prioritize actions for Year One, Two and
    Three to advance student achievement and
    implement MMGW key practices
  • Determine professional development needed to
    achieve goals

6
Nursing Education
Educational Technology Cooperative
Educational Policy and Programs
Doctoral Scholars
Comprehensive School Improvement
Evalutech
Academic Common Market
State Services
Electronic Campus
7
Workshop Format
  • Introduce each key practice.
  • Discuss indicators for success
  • Determine current status
  • Learn about actions schools take
  • Brainstorm actions in table groups
  • Instructional Strategies are integrated into
    discussions (i.e. Anticipation guide).
  • School develops tentative actions for Year One,
    Year Two and Year Three

8
Why Teams?
  • Teachers spend too little time talking about
    their trade.
  • Teams come up with better ideas.
  • Leadership Teams carry on the process if a leader
    leaves.
  • Teamwork improves communication.

9
Leadership Team
  • School leadership
  • Representatives from each focus team
  • Community/business leaders
  • Parents
  • Students (optional)

10
Developing the Improvement Plan The MMGW Way
  • School leadership forms focus teams
  • Curriculum
  • Guidance
  • Professional development
  • Evaluation
  • Transition/Special ad hoc
  • Alternative Formats
  • Around challenges
  • Around school/district improvement goals

11
How Many Do You Remember?
  • Take one minute to work independently to list all
    the items on the following slide
  • (hint there are 24)

12
Teams Work Best
13
Teams Work Better
  • Now work together in table teams to see if your
    table can come up with all 24.
  • I have a prize for the team with the most!

14
Teams Work Best
15
Improvement Planning, Using the MMGW Design
  • Where do we begin?

16
Where do you begin to implement a school
improvement plan?
  • Establish a consensus among faculty and
    community about the need to change.

17
How do you develop a consensus for the need to
change?
  • Tell the truth about current status.
  • Organize teacher and parent study teams around
    critical questions.

18
Why Are the Middle Grades Important?
  • Students are often unprepared for
    college-preparatory high school English/ language
    arts, mathematics, and science.
  • Failure rates in grade nine keep increasing.
  • High dropout rates in grade 10.
  • More rigorous requirements for high school
    graduation, post-secondary study, and a good job.

19
Goal ofMaking Middle Grades Work
  • Increase the percentage of
    eighth-graders who perform at the proficient
    level or above in reading, mathematics, and
    science and who leave eighth grade ready for
    college-preparatory work in high school.

20
Goals ofMaking Middle Grades Work
  • To strengthen links between elementary school and
    high school.
  • To emphasize that access to a rigorous academic
    core is imperative for high student achievement.

  • To communicate the importance of high
    expectations for all students.
  • To construct a framework for success.

21
Goals ofMaking Middle Grades Work
  • To advocate for systems of extra help and
    transition support for all students.
  • To provide strategies for teachers working
    together and effectively to increase student
    achievement.
  • To foster belief systems that explicitly says
    that all students matter.
  • To include parents in the mission.

22
Work Harder to Get Smarter
  • MMGW requires schools to rethink our beliefs
    about education and learning. We need to change
    our thinking and our language from an
    ability-based learning model to an effort-based
    learning model.

23
Comprehensive FrameworkMaking Middle Grades Work
  • The Ten Key
  • Research-based Practices

24
Organizing Themes
  • Continuous improvement guided by data analysis
    and a clear mission and vision
  • Raise expectations and provide extra help and
    time
  • Rigorous academics
  • Effective guidance and support for all students
    that ensures successful transitions to and from
    the middle grades
  • Strong instructional leadership and focused
    professional development
  • Teachers work together to provide engaging,
    challenging instruction that integrates
    technology effectively

25
What Does Being a Member School Mean?
  • Network of almost 300 schools in 21 states using
    MMGW framework for school improvement.
  • Commitment to deeply implement MMGWs
    research-based Key Practices.
  • Commitment to identify gaps and challenges.

26
Implementing the Design
  • Where do we begin?..
  • From the beginning.

27
Clear Mission and aVision of Success
  • Getting the Middle Grades Mission
  • Right means
  • Making sure the goals and priorities for your
    school are clear..
  • To prepare all students for rigorous
    college-preparatory courses in high school
  • Inform parents regularly of students readiness
    for high school

28
  • MMGW Vision . . . .
  • States, districts and schools must send a
    clear message that the goal and priority of
    middle grades education is to prepare all
    students for college-preparatory courses in high
    school.

29
Critical Questions
  • How well are incoming ninth-graders prepared?
    Are those students ready to do independent study
    and rigorous high school work?
  • What do graduates believe that their middle
    grades school should have done to better prepare
    them for high school and beyond?
  • What percentage of students who enter grade nine
    fail to graduate in four years? Why?

30
We asked teachers at MMGW sites
  • 48 report that preparing almost all students
    with academic knowledge and skills needed in
    college-preparatory English, mathematics and
    science courses in high school is a very
    important goal

31
We asked teachers at MMGW sites
  • 16 ranked preparing almost all students with the
    academic knowledge and skills needed in
    college-preparatory English, mathematics and
    science courses in high school as the most
    important goal
  • 45 agree that the goals and priorities for their
    school are clear

32
What Are Indicators?
  • Practices strongly associated with improved
    student achievement
  • Link to key practices, key conditions and values
    held by HSTW and MMGW since the beginning
  • Indicators communicate clear expectations to all
    stakeholders
  • Rooted in educational research

33
Indicators for Achieving the Middle Grades
Mission
  • Teachers report
  • Preparing almost all students with the academic
    knowledge and skills needed in college-preparatory
    English, math and science courses in high school
    is a very important goal.
  • Making sure all students leave 8th grade with the
    knowledge and skills necessary to be successful
    without remediation in a college-preparatory
    curriculum in 9th grade is the primary mission
    for their school.

34
Indicators for Achieving the Middle Grades
Mission
  • Teachers report
  • They strongly agree the goals and priorities for
    their school are clear.
  • They inform parents and students about the
    students readiness to do challenging high school
    studies at least once a semester.

35
Indicators for Achieving the Middle Grades
Mission
  • Teachers report
  • They strongly agree that the surrounding
    community actively supports the schools
    instructional goals.
  • They strongly agree that teachers in their school
    maintain a demanding yet supportive environment
    that pushes students to do their best.

36
Establishing a Baseline
  • Page 10

37
Team Planning Time Working Toward the Mission
  • Current Mission and Beliefs Statements p. 11-12

38
RigorousAcademic Core
  • Key Practice
  • Upgraded academic core (pages 4-5)

39
Activity Pre-learning Concept Check
  • Complete An Inventory on Rigorous Curriculum
    (p.13)
  • Compare answers with those at your table
  • Return to whole group

40
Provide Content That isRigorous and Challenging
  • Content that historically has been taught to the
    top 25 of students
  • Content that is compared to state, national and
    international benchmarks

41
Actions to Teach the Recommended Academic Core to
Standards
  • Examine assignments to ensure alignment with
    standards and proficient-level work Align
    assignments and assessments to the proficient
    level.
  • Create common end of unit and course exams and
    scoring guides
  • Establish an assessment system to provide
    feedback on specific knowledge and standards at
    least quarterly
  • Examine assessment results to determine student
    deficiencies

42
Actions to Teach the Recommended Academic Core to
Standards
  • Benchmark assignments to the proficient or
    advanced level.
  • Use performance descriptors to evaluate the level
    of questions.
  • Use higher-order questions during classroom
    discussions and on all assessments.
  • Develop common course syllabi, rubrics and
    end-of-course exams.
  • Get teachers to agree and display samples of
    student work that earn an A or B.

43
Team Planning TimeMiddle Grades Academic Core
  • What actions can your middle school take to
    increase the rigor of the core academic courses?
    p. 14

44
Key Practice Set high expectations and get
students to meet them
45
RaisingExpectations
  • The school expects high-quality work from all
    students and all students participate in
    challenging classes.

46
Four Corners Activity
  • The four corners of the room are each marked with
    a word.
  • Please move to the corner that most represents
    your feelings toward this statement.

47
Why high expectations?
  • Expect more get more.
  • All students should have access to
    college-preparatory curriculum.
  • School counts when students have to work hard
    to meet high expectations.
  • Students value themselves when the school sees
    them as worthy enough to complete challenging
    work.

48

Indicators of High Expectations
  • Teachers often
  • set standards and are willing to help students
    meet them.
  • encourage students to do well.
  • indicate the amount and quality of work necessary
    to earn an A or B.

49

Indicators of High Expectations
  • Students often
  • revise essays or other written work to improve
    quality.
  • work hard to meet high standards on assignments.
  • spend an hour or more on homework each day.
  • report that school and classroom rules are
    defined and clear often
  • report that they failed to complete or turn in
    assignments never or rarely.

50
Gauging Your School
  • What is the current status of your school?
  • Complete planner page 15

51
Assessment Data Tables
  • 2006 network data all sites, original 2006
    indicators
  • 2004 high/low implementation sites 25 high and
    25 low-implementation sites with additional new
    indicators

52

Getting at Deep Implementation of the Design
  • The data are clear schools that more deeply
    implement the MMGW improvement design have
    significantly higher student achievement than
    schools with low implementation rates, and this
    can be tracked and measured in all schools.

53
Comparison Percentages of Students Experiencing
High Expectations
p 54
Student Performance by Intensity of High
Expectations
55
Teachers Affect the Expectations of Students
  • 61 of teachers in 2006 agree that students
    success or failure in school is due to factors
    largely beyond a teachers control.
  • Almost 80 of middle grades teachers do not ask
    students to revise work until it meets standards.

56
High Expectation Practices and Meeting
Achievement Goals
Reading
Mathematics
Science
Source 2006 Middle Grades Assessment
57
Team Planning TimeRaising Expectations
  • What actions do you plan to take to raise
    expectations for your students?
  • Team planning time. p. 16

58
Engaging Students in Learning
  • Key Practice
  • Classroom practices that engage students in
    their learning
  • Use of technology for learning

59
Why Engaging Practices are Needed
  • The more interesting an assignment is, the more
    likely students are to complete it.
  • Students are more engaged when they can build on
    prior knowledge and see connections to the world
    they live in.
  • Even small opportunities for choice give students
    a greater sense of autonomy.
  • Students are more engaged when sharing what they
    are learning is needed by others in the group to
    complete an assignment.

60
Giving the Curriculum Meaning and Purpose
  • Authentic problems, concrete experiences
  • A problem-solving approach
  • Inquiry-based learning
  • Integrated projects across the curriculum

61
The Teaching Practices Gap
  • A cluster of five teaching practices and student
    experiences is a significant predictor of higher
    student achievement in reading, mathematics and
    science
  • The more often students reported the practices,
    the higher their scores regardless of race,
    poverty and gender
  • Teachers can and do control these practices in
    their classrooms

62
Teaching Practices Related to Higher Student
Achievement
  • Indicating the amount and quality of work needed
    to earn an A or B
  • Encouraging students to do well in school
  • Encouraging students to help and learn from each
    other
  • Knowing the subject and making it interesting and
    useful
  • Setting high standards and helping students meet
    them

63
(No Transcript)
64
Teachers who know their subject are always
asking about the hows and whys they ask us
to compare and contrast, and they challenge us to
think!an eighth-grade student
65
Student engagement is not
Student engagement is
  • Giving students choices in assignments and
    assessments
  • Providing assignments that challenge students to
    develop ideas and to think
  • Allowing students to share what they have learned
  • Drill sheets
  • Copying notes from the board
  • Assignments with no variety and no choice
  • Activity for activitys sake

66
Activity Learning Pyramid
  • Teams brainstorm which teaching practices
    correspond to each level of the pyramid.
  • Group views the slides and discusses correlation
    with team responses.

67
HOW WE LEARN 1 10 20 30
50
70 80 95 98
Learning Pyramid
68
HOW WE LEARN 1 10 20 30
50
70 80 95 98
Fill out worksheet
Read assignment
Hear only lecture
Using only visuals
Lecture with visuals
Discussion with others
Having a personal experience Making connections
(hands on)
Teach someone else
Use art, drama, music, movement
Integrated curriculum with content
69
Where does your school stand?
  • Complete page 17 in your planner with your team.


70
Considerations of Each Activity
  • Which instructional strategies are used
    consistently by teachers across all classrooms?
  • Which instructional strategy would you like to
    use more often during the upcoming school year?
  • What help will teachers need to use new
    strategies?
  • What staff development plans are focused on this
    goal?

71
Team Planning TimeStudent Engagement
  • What actions do you plan to take to engage more
    students research-based strategies across the
    curriculum?
  • Team planning time. p. 18

72
Quality InstructionIndicators for Each Content
Area
73
Engaging Strategies That Work
  • Language Arts
  • Literacy
  • Mathematics
  • Science

74
Engaging Strategies That Work
  • Consider the degree to which the literacy
    indicators are in place in your school. (page 19)

75
Content IndicatorsLanguage Arts
  • Students report
  • Taking advanced English/language arts classes.
  • Writing a major research paper (with footnotes
    and bibliography) on a subject they choose once a
    semester or once a year.
  • Completing short writing assignments of one to
    three pages for a grade weekly.
  • Reading a minimum of 25 books (or the equivalent)
    across the curriculum each year.
  • Using reading and writing strategies to
    understand and use the content of all classes.
  • Reading 11 or more books this year both in and
    out of school.

76
Why do we need to focus on reading writing for
learning?
  • Reading and Writing
  • Are keys to learning in all subjects.
  • Advance student achievement.
  • Assist students in advancing in our information
    based society.

77
Research Based Strategies that Target Literacy
  • Revise written work for quality
  • Write in-depth explanations
  • Use word processing
  • Complete short writing assignments (in English,
    math and science)
  • Discuss topics with other students
  • Read books outside of class
  • Read technical materials

78
Fifteen Literacy Strategies Any Teacher Can and
Should Use
  • 1. Admit slips
  • 2. Exit slips
  • 3. Double entry or two column notes
  • 4. ReQuest
  • 5. Interactive CLOZE
  • 6. Cubing
  • 7. Open-response questions A KEY

79
Fifteen Literacy Strategies Any Teacher Can and
Should Use
8. KWL charts 9. Metaphorical Thinking 10. Jigsa
w reading 11. Paired Reading 12. Graphic organiz
ers 13. GIST 14. WordSplash/Capsule Vocabulary
15. RAFT
80
Three tougher ones that work great in all classes!
  • Anticipation Guides/Pre-learning Concept Checks
  • Activating prior knowledge
  • Socratic Seminars
  • Focusing class discussions
  • Using all levels of Blooms

81
Student Performance by Intensity of Literacy
Experiences
82
Team Planning TimeEngaging Literacy Strategies
  • What actions do you plan to take to increase
    engaging literacy activities for your students?
  • Team planning time. p. 20

83
Content IndicatorsMathematics
  • Offer accelerated curriculum
  • Use SREBs 12 indicators for readiness in
    mathematics
  • Content indicators (by end of grade eight)
  • Algebra I taught like college-prep high school
    Algebra (intensive rigor)
  • Pre-algebra (moderate rigor)
  • Mathematics (low rigor)

84
Engaging Strategies That Work
  • Consider the degree to which the
    mathematics/numeracy indicators are in place in
    your school. (page 21)

85
Middle Grades ContentNumeracy Indicators
  • Students report
  • Developing and analyzing tables, charts and
    graphs in their schoolwork often.
  • Using a scientific calculator weekly.
  • Solving math problems other than those in
    textbook at least weekly.
  • Working with one or more students in their class
    on a challenging mathematics assignment monthly
    or weekly.
  • Working in groups to brainstorm how to solve a
    mathematics problem monthly or weekly.

SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
86
Middle Grades ContentNumeracy Indicators
  • Students report
  • Explaining to the class how they solved a
    mathematics problem monthly or weekly.
  • Explaining different ways for solving mathematics
    problems monthly or weekly.
  • Using their math skills to solve problems in
    other classes monthly or weekly.
  • That their mathematics teaches showed them how
    math can be used to solve problems in real life.
  • That their teachers know their subject and can
    make it interesting and useful often.

SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
87
Middle Grades ContentNumeracy Indicators
  • Students report
  • That their teachers encourage them to help each
    other and learn from each other sometimes or
    often.
  • Using the internet to find information for
    completing assignments often.
  • Using work-processing software to complete an
    assignments or project often.

SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
88
Student Performance by Intensity of Numeracy
Experiences
89
Team Planning TimeEngaging Numeracy Strategies
  • What actions do you plan to take to increase
    engaging numeracy activities for your students?
  • Team planning time. p. 22

90
Middle Grades ContentScience Indicators
  • Students report
  • Completing science projects that take a week or
    more.
  • Completing written lab reports once a semester or
    monthly.
  • Working with one or more students to complete
    challenging science assignments once a semester
    or monthly.
  • Using equipment to do activities in science labs
    with tables and sinks once a semester or monthly.

SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
91
Content IndicatorsScience
  • Students report
  • Using word-processing software to complete an
    assignment or project often.
  • Completing short writing assignments of one to
    three pages for a grade in science once a
    semester.
  • Using a laptop computer, a lab book or notebook
    to keep records, logs and comments.
  • Writing long answers to questions on tests in
    science monthly.

SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
92
Content Indicators Science
  • Students report
  • That teachers know their subject and can make it
    interesting and useful often.
  • That teachers encourage them to help each other
    and learn from each other sometimes or often.
  • Developing and analyzing tables, charts and/or
    graphs in their schoolwork often.
  • Using the Internet to find information for
    completing assignments often.

SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
93
Engaging Strategies That Work
  • Consider the degree to which the science
    indicators are in place in your school. (page 23)

94
Student Performance by Intensity of Science
Experiences
95
Team Planning TimeEngaging Science Strategies
  • What actions do you plan to take to increase
    engaging science activities for your students?
  • Team planning time. p. 24

96
Content IndicatorsSocial Studies
  • Understand the essential concepts of geography,
    economics, history and government.
  • Analyze conflicts and debate and defend a
    position.
  • Participate in hands-on activities such as
  • problem-solving and decision-making in the real
    world
  • simulations
  • service learning

97
Content Indicators for Exploratory Courses
  • aligned to core academic standards
  • reading and writing to learn emphasis
  • align to technology competencies/skills
  • projects integrating academic standards
  • projects that explore different career pathways

98
Guiding and Supporting All Students
  • Key Practice
  • A belief that all students matter

99
Key PracticeGuidance - All Students Matter
All students need long-term personal
relationships with an adult at the school who
will work with them and their parents to set
learning goals and to develop education and
career plans.
100
Current Status in Guidance and Advisement
  • Consider the degree to which the guidance and
    advisement indicators are in place in your
    school. (page 25)

101
Activity Best Practices Newsletter Guidance
and Advisement
  • Brainstorm elements of a comprehensive guidance
    and advisement system. Use vignettes to help
    generate ideas. (p. 26-30)

102
Why guidance and advisement?
  • Every student needs help in setting tentative
    educational and career goals.
  • Every student needs a plan aligned to their
    educational and career goals.
  • Every student needs help and support from their
    families in setting goals.
  • Every student needs to feel a sense of personal
    belonging in school that comes from an adviser
    relationship.

103
Goals of Guidance and Advisement
  • Middle grades
  • become familiar with high school requirements
  • develop tentative education plans for high school
    and at least one year of post secondary

104
Goals of Guidance and Advisement
  • The school provides career exploration, academic
    advisement and educational planning for all
    students through a structured approach that
    connects adult advisers and students.
  • The school helps students and parents understand
    high school graduation requirements and knowledge
    and skills needed for success in postsecondary
    education or employment.

105
Advisement Content Areas
  • Academic Development
  • Career Development
  • Personal Social Development
  • The more students know about education and
    career options and requirements, the more reasons
    they have to set goals and work hard to
    achievement.
  • Source Things That Matter Most in Improving
    Student Achievement, SREB

106
Elements of an Advisor/Advisee program
  • The teacher-adviser has a well-defined role.
  • Teacher-advisers have a comprehensive curriculum,
    materials and activities.
  • The teacher-adviser meets with students and their
    parents regularly.
  • The teacher-adviser helps struggling students
    find the extra help they need.

107
Indicators of a High-quality Guidance and
Advisement System
  • Students report
  • Being encouraged by a counselor to teacher to
    take Algebra in 7th or 8th grade
  • Having a written plan for courses they plan to
    take in high school
  • That their parents and someone at school helped
    them write their plan for courses they will take
    in high school.

108
Indicators of a High-quality Guidance and
Advisement System
  • Students report
  • That they expect to take notes from a lecture
    weekly in ninth-grade English.
  • That they expect to use mathematics to solve
    real-world problems weekly in ninth-grade
    mathematics.
  • That they have talked with teacher or other
    adults at school about what they will need to
    know and be able to do in ninth grade.

109
Student Performance by Intensity of Guidance
Experiences
110
Team Planning TimeGuidance and Advisement
  • What can your school do to improve the guidance
    and advisement process for students? p. 31

111
Key Practice Provide a structured system of
extra help to assist students in meeting higher
standards.
112
Current Status of Extra Help
  • Top of page 32

113
Why extra help?
  • Reduce the failure rate.
  • Reduce the middle grades retention rate.
  • Encourage students to stretch themselves
    academically.
  • Convince parents that the school cares.
  • Build students confidence.

114
Extra Help Indicators
  • Students report that
  • that their teachers care about them enough that
    they often will not let them get by without doing
    the work.
  • they are often able to get help from their
    teachers when they need it without much
    difficulty.
  • teachers or other adults in the school are
    available to help before, during or after school
    a few times a week.

115
Extra Help Indicators
  • the extra help they received at school helped
    them to understand their schoolwork better
    sometimes or often.
  • That they tried harder on their schoolwork after
    receiving extra help sometimes or often.

116
Student Performance by Intensity of Extra Help
Indicators
117
Actions for Improving Extra Help
  • Tutoring
  • Mentoring
  • Before and after school programs that extend the
    school day
  • Summer programs that both enrich and accelerate
  • Longer blocks of time when needed
  • Immersion and catch-up strategies
  • Contracts for learning

118
Team Planning TimeExtra Help
  • How can your school both better use its current
    extra help structures and create new ones to help
    students meet higher standards? 2nd area of page
    33

119
Successful Transitions
  • Key Practice
  • A belief that all students matter

120
Readiness for High School Where Do We Stand?
  • Middle Grades Students
  • 86 plan further study after high school.
  • 29 had intensive literacy experiences.
  • 25 had intensive numeracy experiences.
  • Well over half of the current students leaving
    middle school are not ready for high school work
    based upon their experience at the middle grades.

121
Where does your school stand on the transition
to high school?
  • Complete bottom of page 32 in your planner with
    your team.

122
Why target middle school transition?
  • The transition point from middle school to high
    school has the highest percentages of dropouts
    nation wide.
  • The highest failure rate occurs in grade nine.
  • Preparing students for high school work directly
    impacts retention.

123
Successful Transition Programs
  • Bring middle grades and high school personnel
    together to examine each others curriculum and
    requirements
  • Require all students to have a five-year
    educational plan by the end of eighth grade
  • Provide information on the new school for
    students and parents
  • Provide social support for students
  • Focus on increasing parental involvement

124
To Assure Students Are Ready for High School
  • District, high school and middle school leaders
    can
  • Establish and implement readiness indicators for
    challenging high school English, mathematics and
    science courses
  • Align curriculum and teacher assignments and
    assessments to the SREB readiness indicators
  • Set goals to annually increase the percentages of
    students having successfully completed Algebra I
    by the end of grade eight.

125
Transitions Jigsaw Activity
  • Each group is assigned one school vignette that
    profiles how the school provided extra help and
    support to ensure students success.
  • Each group identifies key points.
  • Each participant returns to their initial group
    and shares the key findings from their reading.

126
Transition Strategies Summer Bridge
  • Develop a four- to six-week program for entering
    ninth-graders who need further study to succeed
    in high school
  • focus on reading, mathematics, computer and study
    skills
  • include career education components
  • include high-interest, challenging activities
  • taught by most effective teachers

127
Transition Strategies HighQuality Catch-Up
Courses
  • Requires a week-long training and extensive
    follow up with a coach.
  • Teachers plan in teams.
  • Staff moves from a remedial approach to an
    acceleration approach a sense of urgency.
  • School develops a comprehensive evaluation plan.

128
What makes a HighQuality Catch-Up Program?
  • Students are identified early.
  • Qualified teachers with depth of content
    knowledge teach challenging content.
  • Students have a reason for learning.
  • Schools modify schedules to allow students to be
    double-dosed.

129
Some Guidelines for Transitions
  • Provide several activities not just one event
    that involve students, parents, teachers and
    staff from both schools
  • Establish a procedure that can be easily followed
    and updated each year without major new effort
  • Establish a timeline for the procedure and
    activities

130
Some Guidelines for Transitions
  • Schedule meetings between collaborative groups
    from sending and receiving schools both
    students and adults
  • Assess the human and financial resources
    available for support
  • Identify student and adult leaders from all
    schools to help with the transition

131
Team Planning Time Transitions
  • What outstanding practices are already in place
    at your school for extra help and transitions?
    (top of page 33)

132
Team Planning Time Transitions
  • Which transitions are most urgent at your school
    and what actions are needed? (parts 3 and 4 of
    page 34)
  • What can your school do to improve the transition
    process for students from middle school to high
    school and elementary to middle?
  • Are summer bridge programs or Catch-Up courses
    needed?

133
Creating a Climate of Continuous Improvement
  • Key Practices
  • Strong Leadership
  • Using data
  • Qualified teachers
  • Teachers Working Together

134
Strong Leadership
  • What is the current status of leadership at your
    school? (page 34)

135
Using Data
  • Use student assessment and program evaluation
    data to improve curriculum, instruction, school
    climate, organization and management to advance
    student learning.
  • Keeping score.continuous improvement!

136
Why Use Data
  • Clarify where you are. . . And where you need
    to be
  • Inspire change
  • Determine progress
  • Link achievement with changes in school
    and classroom practices
  • Identify what doesnt work
  • Celebrate accomplishments

137
How schools measure progress!
  • MMGW Student Assessment
  • Promotion/retention percentages
  • College-preparatory course enrollment
    percentages
  • Distribution of grades
  • Student survey
  • Teacher Survey
  • Attendance at extra help sessions
  • Responses from student and parent interviews and
    focus groups
  • Follow-up Study
  • Annual Report
  • Ninth-grade failures
  • High School Drop-out Rates
  • Technical Assistance Visits

138
How schools measure the depth of implementation!
  • The MMGW Assessment
  • NAEP referenced assessment in Reading,
    Mathematics and Science
  • Student survey of school and classroom practices
  • Faculty Survey
  • School Data Profile
  • Technical Assistance Visit review of school and
    classroom practices
  • MMGW Annual Report A reflection by the school
    of progress
  • Portfolio of Progress
  • Use MMGW Design Implementation Plan

139
Higher-performing sites have a Climate of
Continuous Improvement
140
Higher-performing sites have a Climate of
Continuous Improvement
141
Higher-performing sites have a Climate of
Continuous Improvement
142
Higher-performing sites have a Climate of
Continuous Improvement
143
Continuous Improvement Indicators
  • Teachers strongly agree
  • That teachers in their school are always learning
    and seeking new ideas on how to improve students
    achievement.
  • That staff use data reports to continuously
    evaluate the schools academic and technical
    program and activities.

144
Continuous Improvement Indicators
  • Teachers strongly agree
  • That the teachers and administrators in this
    school work as a team to improve the achievement
    of students in this school.
  • That the goals and priorities for this school are
    clear.
  • That teachers in this school maintain a demanding
    yet supportive environment that pushes students
    to do their best.

145
Strong Leadership Indicators
  • Teachers strongly agree
  • That the principal consults with staff members
    before making decisions that affect them.
  • From school data
  • The schools structure for improvement involves a
    number of committees with representatives from
    the school and the community.
  • School improvement teams are aligned with and
    address all elements of MMGWs comprehensive
    improvement framework.

146
Strong Leadership Indicators
  • Teachers strongly agree
  • Improvement actions are based on evidence
    supplied by multiple data sources.
  • An action plan is reviewed annually by all
    partners in improvement and includes interim
    assessments of progress.
  • The school uses multiple strategies to share
    student achievement data with the community at
    large.

147
Closing the Gaps
  • Improving student achievement is
  • about changing the experiences all students
    receive throughout the school.
  • not about improving individual student scores.
  • about closing the gaps in opportunity,
    expectations, possibilities and achievement for
    all students.

148
Closing the Gaps
  • Achievement Gaps
  • Exist when test scores, classroom grade
    distribution and failure and retention rates are
    markedly different between sub-groups of
    students.
  • Opportunity Gaps
  • Exist when enrollment in higher-level courses
    such as Algebra or honors or advanced classes,
    foreign languages, etc. is limited to some
    sub-groups of students.
  • Expectation Gaps
  • Exist when teachers and/or students do not expect
    the same performance from some sub-groups of
    students.
  • Possibility Gaps
  • Exist when schools cannot accept that their
    students can achieve at higher levels compared to
    like schools that are performing at higher levels.

149
Analysis of the Achievement Gap
  • On MMGW and state assessments
  • Are there variations (gaps) among different
    subgroups?
  • Is one group progressing at a faster or slower
    pace than others?
  • What characteristics are more common at some
    grade levels or content areas than others?
  • Can administrators and teachers identify
    classroom practices that increase achievement
    within various subgroups?

150
Analysis of the Opportunity Gap
  • On MMGW and state assessments
  • What is being taught to each group?
  • Who is teaching the various levels?
  • How are students placed in classrooms?
  • How are students achieving based on their
    experiences?

151
Analysis of the Expectation Gap
  • On MMGW and state assessments
  • What school policies are in place to convey
    behavior and attendance expectations?
  • How do current protocols and practices convey
    school expectations?
  • What do school attendance, graduation and
    discipline reports convey about consistent
    expectations by subgroup and grade level?

152
Analysis of the Possibility Gap
  • Are there other schools with similar demographics
    that have higher student achievement?
  • What are those schools doing differently?
  • Expectations
  • Behavior
  • Attendance
  • Enrollment in higher-level courses

153
Team Planning TimeContinuous Improvement and
Strong Leadership
  • What actions can your middle school take to
    improve the climate and strengthen the leadership
    support? p. 35

154
Actions to Cultivate a Climate for Continuous
Improvement
  • Establish AND USE a clear mission and goal.
  • Teachers maintain a demanding and supportive
    environment.
  • Teachers/administrators work as a team
  • Teachers use data to evaluate school and
    classroom practices.
  • School wide focus on a few action plans with
    entire faculty agreeing to take the actions.

155
What process do schools use to change? (page 6)
  • Establish a consensus among faculty and community
    about the need to change.
  • Create a vision of what they want the school to
    look like.
  • Establish interim targets to reach the vision.
  • Establish small, concrete actions to reach the
    vision.
  • Celebrate successes along the way.

156
Why Teams?
  • Teachers spend too little time talking about
    their trade.
  • Teams come up with better ideas.
  • Leadership Teams carry on the process if a leader
    leaves.
  • Teamwork improves communication.

157
Leadership Team
  • School leadership
  • Representatives from each focus team
  • Community/business leaders
  • Parents
  • Students (optional)

158
Developing the Improvement Plan The MMGW Way
  • School leadership forms focus teams (Planner
    pages 36-37)
  • Curriculum
  • Guidance
  • Professional development
  • Evaluation
  • Transition/Special ad hoc
  • Alternative Formats
  • Around challenges
  • Around school/district improvement goals

159
Spotlight on Excellence
  • Stemmers Run Middle School
  • 201 Stemmers Run Road Baltimore,  MD   21221
  • (985) 764-9946
  • Contact John Ward, Principal

160
Developing Focus Teams at Your School
  • Explain
  • How selected
  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Focus area responsibility based upon workshop
    analysis

161
Teachers Working Together presenter may need to
move ahead to slide 166)
  • Key Practice
  • Teachers working together is the
  • glue that holds the organizing
  • themes together

162
Why Do Teachers Need to Work Together?
  • Serves as a model for cooperation / project
    based learning
  • Changes teachers focus
  • Changes teachers perceptions of students and of
    each other
  • Helps teachers grow
  • Promotes professionalism
  • Contributes to a climate of continuous improvement

163
Why integrate subject matter?
  • Connects classroom learning to the real world
  • Helps teachers expand their teaching strategies
  • Improves academic achievement
  • Helps students recognize aptitudes and interests
    related to career goals
  • Allows teachers to gain knowledge and skills from
    each other

164
Teachers Working TogetherIndicators
  • Provide teachers
  • time to work together to plan, develop and
    conduct high-quality learning experiences.
  • opportunities to discuss student best work and
    teacher best practices.

165
Conditions for Supporting Integration
  • Common planning time
  • Standards-based, not activity-based
  • Create organizational structure that will support
    teacher collaboration
  • Provide large blocks of instructional time for
    completion of complex tasks.
  • Provide professional development to support
    teachers.
  • Establish clear expectations for teachers
    collaboration by invitation does not work.
  • Planner, p.46

166
Supporting Staff with Professional Development
Indicators
  • Teachers report
  • Meeting monthly as teams of academic and
    fine/related arts teachers to plan joint
    instructional activities and take collective
    responsibility for students learning.
  • That a great deal of their staff development
    experiences have resulted in them holding
    students to current national standards developed
    by teacher sin their fields.

167
Supporting Staff with Professional Development
Indicators
  • Teachers report
  • Participating in the following types of staff
    development during the last three years
  • Workshops with regular follow-ups
  • Reading professional literature and viewing
    professional videotapes with a study group
  • Being observed and receiving feedback from other
    educators
  • Working with other teachers who are successful in
    having students master high-level content.

168
Supporting Staff with Professional Development
Indicators
  • Teachers report
  • That professional development programs are
    sustained over time, with ample follow-up
    activities, a great deal or somewhat.
  • All teachers use common planning time to examine
    student work and improve instruction.
  • All staff has access to technology training and
    equipment.
  • Hold content majors or minors in the subjects
    they teach.

169
Building Support for Professional Development
  • Use practitioners who can describe how
    professional development increased their
    effectiveness
  • Assess, document and report the effects of
    professional development in the school and
    classroom
  • Be specific in describing what matters in
    helping teachers be more effective

170
What Does Being a Member School Mean?
  • Commitment to develop plans to close gaps and
    meet challenges by deeply implementing the MMGW
    key practices.
  • Access to network of schools working on the same
    practices.
  • Telephone and email access to school improvement
    experts and all MMGW staff for assistance.
  • Many no cost services sponsored by your state.

171
Whats Next
172
Next Steps
  • You cant attempt to implement them all at one
    time or none of them will get done well..
  • MMGW is about DEEP implementation of the key
    practices, and efforts must be spread out over a
    3-5 year period of time to see the best results.
  • Where do we go from here?

173
School Improvement Team Membership
  • Overall Site Team
  • Membership System administrator, school
    principal, academic and exploratory teachers,
    business/community, parents, students, focus team
    leaders.
  • Focus Teams -- Curriculum, Professional
    Development, Guidance/Public Information,
    Evaluation, Transitions
  • Membership Teachers, business/community
    representative(s), system/central office staff
  • Focus Teams Based on Key Practices

174
Focus Team Expectations
  • Establish concrete action plans based upon
    recommendations from brainstorming
  • Use plans to detail each step toward
    implementation and support needed from school,
    district and state, and SREB
  • Submit plans to leadership team

175
Prioritizing Actions p. 38-39
  • Review actions developed for each goal throughout
    the workshop.
  • Prioritize goals to work toward during year one.

  • Choose indicators on which to work during year
    one.
  • Determine specific actions to address year one
    goals.

176
Prioritizing Actions p. 40
  • Choose indicators on which to work during year
    one.
  • Literacy reading 25 books, weekly writing in
    every week
  • Math get almost all students into real Algebra
    for credit in grade 8
  • Course syllabi, A and B work, redo work, rubrics,
    engaging activities
  • Choose indicators on which to work during year
    two and three.
  • Determine specific strategies to reach identified
    goals.

177
Developing Plans to Engage All Stakeholders (page
41)
  • Generate plan to go back and engage your entire
    school in the MMGW goals and framework
  • Develop focus teams (p. 52)
  • Establishing Effective Focus Teams publication
  • Brainstorm strategies for engaging parents,
    students, the school board and the community
  • Venues
  • Materials needed

178
Summary and Follow-Up
  • Focus Teams will present staff development
    priorities for Year One.
  • Principal or Site Coordinator will send a final
    copy of 3-year action plan to the MMGW state
    coordinator who will forward a copy to SREB/MMGW.

179
REMEMBER
  • All schools want to improve but few want to
    change. The fact remains that to improve one
    MUST change.

180
Next Steps
  • KEEP MOVING! The next 60 days are critical to
    your Success!
  • Home Depot Approach You can build it and we can
    help! Remember, you own the plan!
  • You cant attempt to implement your goals all at
    one time or none of them will get done well.
  • MMGW is about DEEP implementation of the 10 Key
    Practices

181
Contacts
  • Toni Eubank, Director
  • toni.eubank_at_sreb.org, 404-879-5610
  • Barbara Moore, Associate Director
    barbara.moore_at_sreb.org 404-879-5596
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