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PROPER MANAGEMENT

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Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) is a program to ensure that beef ... ELIMINATE UNSOUNDNESS. FEET AND LEGS. UDDERS AND TEATS. PREGNANCY CHECKING. DISEASE MONITOR ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: PROPER MANAGEMENT


1
MID ATLANTIC BEEF QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM
Maine, Maryland, New Jersey, New York,
Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia
2
What is Beef Quality Assurance?
  • Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) is a program to
    ensure that beef and dairy cattle are maintained
    in a manner, which will result in a safe and
    wholesome beef product for the consumer.
  • The BQA Certification program is based on
    recommended national guidelines and scientific
    research.
  • The purpose of BQA is to protect consumer
    confidence in beef safety and quality.

3
What is Certification
  • Process by which producers accept responsibility
    for actions under which cattle on their
    production unit were produced.
  • Process allowing the beef industry to maintain
    its independence from regulatory agencies.

4
BQA Is In The Marketplace
  • February 20,2000
  • All suppliers presenting live animals for
    slaughter at any Con-Agra Beef Company plants
    must have signed the following statement within
    the past year.
  • To the best of my knowledge, all animals
    presented for slaughter have been handled in a
    manner to prevent a pharmaceutical or
    agricultural chemical residue violation. Label
    dosages, route of administration and withdrawal
    times have been followed, and only approved FDA
    pharmaceutical compounds have been used for
    treatment. Any exception to the previous has
    been administered under a recognized
    veterinarian-client-patient relationship and
    proper precautions taken for off-label use.
    Agricultural chemicals used for herd health
    management and production of feedstuffs have also
    been used in compliance with label directions and
    withdrawals.
  • Compliance with State or National BQA
    Certification and Verification programs should
    result in compliance with this statement.

5
What does Quality stand for in Beef Quality
Assurance?
  • Up until a few years ago, 25 or 1 out of every
    4 people ordering beef at a restaurant had an
    unpleasant eating experience.
  • Quality means wholesome and safe,
  • but it also means providing a product to the
    consumer that delivers a desirable eating
    experience (purchase and preparation included).

6
MAKE SURE ALL EATING EXPERIENCES ARE GOOD ONES
  • ALL OF OUR CATTLE WILL ENTER THE HUMAN FOOD CHAIN
    AT SOME POINT
  • WE ARE NOT JUST CATTLE PRODUCERS, WE ARE FOOD
    PRODUCERS!

7
COMPETITION FOR PRODUCT
  • TO REMAIN COMPETITIVE
  • Industry must maintain, even increase, high
    quality standards for their product.
  • Producers must optimize cost and performance,
    produce cattle that are efficient in the feed
    yard and produce carcasses that perform well on
    the rail.
  • QUALITY STANDARDS
  • Free of defects
  • Tender and palatable
  • Yield 1s and 2s and meet targets for quality
    grades

8
COMPETITION FOR PRODUCT
  • SAFETY STANDARDS
  • Industry must continue to enhance image for
    residue avoidance and reduced pathogen
    contamination.
  • RESPONSIBILITY SHARING
  • We all share responsibility to ensure the
    consumer that we are doing all that we can to
    meet high standards in food safety.

9
LACK OF FOOD SAFETY OPENS THE DOOR TO ACTIVISTS
  • Animal activities scare consumers through the
    news media about food safety issues to advance
    their legislative and regulatory agendas.
  • - Florida 2002 Farm Sanctuary funded an effort
    to ban gestation crates for pigs. Measure
    passed and hog production ceased in Florida
  • Food safety is a cost of doing business. A food
    product must be safe. There can be no excuses by
    an industry because there is no tolerance by the
    public!

10
Consumer Concerns About Food Safety
Serious Health Risk
  • Bacteria 69
  • Mad Cow Disease 65
  • Pesticides 65
  • Chemical Additives 61
  • Hormones 55

Source NCBA/IPSOS-Reid - 2002
If its not safe, it wont sell!
11
Residue Avoidance
  • Drug residue in livestock products is an
    important issue confronting the livestock
    industry. Consumers are concerned about the
    drugs used in the industry and how they affect
    the food they eat.
  • Medical communities, government agencies, and
    legislative bodies focus on the animal use of
    antibiotics.
  • based on the panels extensive evaluation of
    the evidence, we have found that the use of
    antibiotics in food animals is contributing to
    the growing problem of antibiotic resistance in
    human infections and must be addressed on an
    urgent basis. SHERWOOD GORBACH, MD, Co-Chair
    of the panel and an infectious disease physician
    based at New England Medical Center

12
REASONS FOR INCREASED CONFIDENCE IN MEDIA
  • MEDIA IS MADE TO ORDER
  • ONLINE NEWSPAPERS
  • NEWS 24 HOURS A DAY (FOXNEWS, CNN)
  • BELIEVE INFORMATION IS PROVEN BEFORE REPORTING
  • EQUALS PERSONAL EXPERIENCE
  • SEEING PEOPLE AFFECTED ENHANCES CREDIBILITY, ADDS
    DRAMA, AND PERSONALIZES THE STORY

Food Marketing Institute, 1999 Survey
13
Media Sources for Consumers on Nutrition
Information
SOURCE Shopping for Health 2001
14
IMPACTS ON BEEF CONSUMPTION
  • DECREASED PUBLIC CONFIDENCE CAUSES REDUCED
    CONSUMPTION
  • 1996, TV PERSONALITY DECLARES,
  • ILL NEVER EAT HAMBURGER AGAIN.
  • RESULT..10 MONTH DECLINE IN BEEF
    CONSUMPTION..700 MILLION DROP IN RETAIL BEEF
    SALES.
  • SUMMER 2002, LARGE GROUND BEEF RECALL DUE TO E.
    Coli O157H7.
  • RESULT..SEPTEMEBER 2002 SURVEY SHOWED BEEF AS
    THE 1 (23) FOOD CONSUMERS WERE MOST CONCERNED
    ABOUT
  • SOURCE- NCBA/IPSOS-REID 2001-2002

15
ATTITUDES ABOUT NUTRITION AND BEEF
Consumers Attitudes
  • BUY 90 LEAN GROUND BEEF IF PRICE IS 67
  • NOT AN ISSUE
  • BELIEVE VITAMINS AND MINERALS IN BEEF ARE 55
  • IMPORTANT IN CHILDREN
  • BELIEVE BEEF IS IMPORTANT FOR A BALANCED
    DIET 48
  • BELIEVE BEEF IS IMPORTANT IN DIET OF WOMEN 42
  • EAT SMALLER PORTIONS THAN 1 YEAR AGO 39
  • BELIEVE BEEF HAS MORE IMPORTANT NUTRIENTS 31
  • THAN CHICKEN
  • FEEL BETTER ABOUT BEEFS NUTRITIONAL VALUE 20
  • THAN LAST YEAR

SOURCE NCBA/IPSOS-REID 2002
16
CONFIDENCE IN GROUPS THAT PRODUCE AND PREPARE FOOD
Consumer Confidence
  • Cattle Farmers and Ranchers 34
  • U.S. Government Meat Inspection 29
  • Sit-down Restaurants 28
  • Supermarkets 26
  • Meat Packing Plants 22
  • Fast Food Restaurants 19

SOURCE- NCBA/IPSOS-REID 2002
17
Alliances and Branded Programs
  • Approximately 60 programs exist today
  • PA Quality Beef, CAB, etc
  • According to Cattle-Fax Cow-Calf Survey collected
    in February 2002, 14 of producers marketed a
    portion of their calves through an alliance or
    co-op in 2001.

18
Advancements Made by the Industry
  • Less than 3 top butts contained a lesion in
    2000, compared to the 22 in the early 1990s.
  • Increase in choice and prime carcasses.
  • Improvement in polled and dehorned cattle.

SOURCE- NBQA 2000
19
Opportunities to be addressed by the industry
  • Create uniformity and consistency of cattle.
  • Slaughter cattle at the appropriate size, weight,
    and condition.
  • Improve beef tenderness
  • Increase marbling

SOURCE- NBQA 2000
20
FEEDSTUFFS
  • Maintain records
  • Pesticide/herbicide use on pasture or crops
  • Do this to avoid any violative residues in our
    product

21
FEEDSTUFFS
  • Assure quality of incoming feedstuffs
  • Monitor for molds and mycotoxins
  • Supplier assurance of quality recommended

22
FEEDSTUFFS
  • Suspect feedstuffs should be analyzed prior to
    use
  • Feeding by-product feeds should be supported by
    sound science

23
FEED ADDITIVES AND MEDICATIONS
  • Only FDA approved products
  • Cant use feed additives extra label
  • Observe withdrawal times
  • Keep records for 2 years

24
Ruminant-Derived Proteins for Cattle
Dont even think about it!!
25
FEED SOURCE BIOSECURITY
  • Develop, implement and document a feed sourcing
    program that incorporates
  • Good Manufacturing Practices
  • (GMPs)

Justify
Verify
vverfy
Monitor
26
HOMEGROWN FEEDS
  • Be aware of any label restrictions for feed or
    grazing of crops after treatment with a herbicide
    or pestiticide
  • Keep records from Planting to Consumption

27
PURCHASED FEEDS
  • Evaluate for moisture, color, odor, texture
  • Observe for foreign materials
  • Suspected feed?
  • Keep sample cool but not frozen

28
FEED STORAGE, PROCESSING, HANDLING
  • Correct Moisture control (mold/mycotoxins/pathogen
    ic bacteria)
  • Prevent lubricants/hydraulic fluid from
    contaminating feed (toxic)
  • When equipment used for non-feed purpose, clean
    before using for feeding purpose
  • (e.g. Front-end loader)

29
Feed Storage
  • Never store chemicals, petroleum products or
    other potentially hazardous materials in areas
    where feed is stored, mixed or processed.

30
BIOSECURITY
  • KEEP IT CLEAN

Be careful of who and what comes onto your farm
and where they have previously been.
31
Impact of Health on Profit and Carcass
32
IMPLANTS
  • Use antiseptic on the needle between every use.
    (Less abscesses)
  • Currently is no withdrawal times for FDA approved
    implants
  • Check implant site whenever cattle are worked

33
Proper Implant Placement
  • Results of improperly placed implants
  • Potentially decreases the efficacy of the implant
  • Trim loss at the packing plant
  • Consumer concerns of beef
  • Safety
  • Wholesomeness
  • Regulatory liability

34
Proper Implant Placement
  • Common Implanting Errors
  • Crushing
  • Active ingredients released too quickly
  • Severing a blood vessel
  • Placing the implant in cartilage
  • Effectiveness may be decreased
  • Absorption of active ingredients is too rapid
  • Improper location of implantation
  • Infected or abscessed sites
  • Always read the product label for proper
    instructions on approved use.

35
Proper Implant Placement
  • Infected or abscessed implants
  • vs
  • Normal Implants
  • Average Daily Gain
  • Reduced 8.9
  • Feed Efficiency
  • Reduced 8.3
  • Net return
  • Reduced 17.70 per head

36
INDIVIDUAL IDENTIFICATION AND RECORDS
  • Treatment Records
  • Individual or group or lot identification
  • Date treated
  • Product administered and manufactures lot/serial
  • Dosage used
  • Route and location of administration
  • Earliest date animal will have cleared withdrawal
    period
  • Tentative diagnosis
  • Outcome of treatment
  • Name of person administering product
  • Records must be kept for 24 months after transfer
    of ownership

37
Have Records will Travel
  • All processing and treatment records should be
    transferred with cattle to the next production
    level
  • Prospective buyers must be informed if any cattle
    have not met withdrawal times

38
PROPER MANAGEMENTEnhances Beef Quality and
Product Value
39
SOME THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT CHEMICAL AND DRUG USE
  • WITHDRAWAL TIME
  • THE NUMBERS OF HOURS OR DAYS AFTER PRODUCT USE
    THAT IT TAKES FOR THE TISSUE CONCENTRATION OF THE
    PRODUCT TO REACH ACCEPTABLE GOVERNMENT LEVELS
  • ILLEGAL RESIDUE
  • CONCENTRATION OF PRODUCT IN EDIBLE TISSUES (MEAT
    AND MILK) WHICH EXCEEDS GOVERNMENT STANDARDS FOR
    THAT PRODUCT

40
AVOIDING ILLEGAL RESIDUES
  • HAVE A DISEASE PREVENTION PLAN
  • PROPER NUTRITION
  • REDUCE ANIMAL STRESS
  • VACCINATE FOR BEST
    PROTECTION WINDOW
  • CONTROL PARASITES

41
AVOIDING ILLEGAL RESIDUES
  • FOLLOW ALL LABEL DIRECTIONS
  • INDICATIONS
  • DOSAGE
  • ADMINISTRATION ROUTE
  • WARNINGS
  • WITHDRAWAL TIME

42
AVOIDING ILLEGAL RESIDUES
  • Directions for use See package insert
  • INDICATIONS For treatment of cattle with
    bacteria infections susceptible to bovacillin
  • DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Inject 3 ml (cc)/100
    pounds body weight once daily subcutaneously
    (under the skin) in cattle only. Do not treat
    more than 7 days. Do not inject more than 10 ml
    per injection site.
  • WARNINGS Discontinue use of this drug 21 days
    before treated animals are slaughtered for food.
    Do not treat lactating dairy animals with this
    drug.
  • Store between 36and 80F.
  • Protect from freezing.
  • LOT 8 8NP 6
  • EXP JUNE 2004

43
AVOIDING ILLEGAL RESIDUES
  • DO NOT USE PRODUCTS EXTRA LABEL WITHOUT A
    PERSCRIPTION FROM YOUR VETERINARIAN!
  • INDICATIONS
  • DOSAGE
  • ADMINISTRATION ROUTE
  • WARNINGS
  • EXTENDED WITHDRAWAL TIME
  • MAINTAIN A VALID VETERINARY CLIENT/PATIENT
    RELATIONSHIP

44
AVOIDING ILLEGAL RESIDUES
  • IDENTIFY AND SEPARATE TREATED ANIMALS
  • KEEP SEPARATE
  • MEET WITHDRAWAL TIME
  • DURABLE IDENTIFICATION

45
AVOIDING ILLEGAL RESIDUES
  • KEEP RECORDS
  • ANIMAL ID
  • PRODUCT NAME
  • DOSAGE
  • DATE USED
  • WITHDRAWAL TIME

Keep Records For 2 Years After Transfer of
Ownership
46
AVOIDING DRUG RESISTANCE
  • EMPHASIZE DISEASE PREVENTION
  • AVOID THE SHOT GUN APPROACH
  • AVOID MASS TREATMENT
  • FOLLOW EXACT LABEL DOSAGE
  • USE FOR SHORTEST TIME POSSIBLE

47
AVOIDING INJECTION SITE DAMAGE
  • PROPER RESTRAINT FACILITIES
  • ALL INJECTIONS IN FRONT OF THE SHOULDERS
  • USE PRODUCTS LABELLED FOR SubQ ADMINISTRATION
  • USE PROPER NEEDLE SIZE
  • USE SHARP NEEDLES
  • 10 cc/SITE - LESS FOR CALVES
  • AT LEAST 4 INCHES APART

48
Required Injection - Location
BQA Guidelines require all injections be given in
the neck in the location shown here.
49
The appropriate location for injections in the
neck will not damage bone or connective tissues.
X
50
Injection Site Blemishes
51
Needle Selection
52
AVOIDING INJECTION SITE DAMAGE
  • CHANGE NEEDLES OFTEN
  • 10-15 ANIMALS
  • USE NEEDLES ONCE AND DISPOSE IF POSSIBLE
  • MAKE SURE INJECTION AREA IS CLEAN

53
DRUG STORAGE AND HANDLING
  • FOLLOW SPECIFIC STORAGE REQUIREMENTS
  • KEEP IN CLEAN SAFE LOCATION
  • STORE OUT OF DIRECT SUNLIGHT

HANDLING PRECAUTIONS READ THE LABEL! NEVER
USE OUTDATED DRUG OR VACCINE NEVER MIX VACCINES
OR OTHER ANINAL HEALTH PRODUCTS
54
TIPS ON CATTLE HANDLING
  • HELP WANTED
  • No bruises
  • No abscesses
  • No dark cutters

Cattle handlers Cattle facilities Cattle truckers
55
Trim Loss
Bulls Cows

Pounds
No Bruises 63.8 20.3 Minor Bruises
25.3 51.5 0.66 Average Bruises 19.5
53.9 1.54 Major Bruises 7.4 30.7
3.19
Non-Fed Beef Quality Audit (NCBA/CSU)
56
Bruising ...Cost the Industry 74.9 Million in
1994
  • Bruise trim loss (26.8 million lbs) ..........
    22.9 million
  • Projected 1994 Non-Fed slaughter ........ 6.3
    million hd
  • Primal devaluation (loin round) ......... 52.0
    million
  • Total economic loss due to bruising ......
    74.9 million
  • Average loss per head non-fed cattle ......
    11.74/head
  • Producer-controllable bruise losses ..........
    3.91/head

57
Bruising and Handling Cattle
  • Methods to decrease bruising
  • Dehorning
  • Trucks and loading chutes
  • Low hanging bars
  • Slick floors
  • Slick and damaged decks
  • End gates
  • Prudent use of prods

58
Improving Management
  • Losses from bruised meat totals more than 27
    million pounds and 61 million.
  • Handle cattle gently through chutes, remove any
    protruding objects and dehorn calves while young.

59
TIPS ON CATTLE HANDLING
  • THINK ABOUT
  • How cattle see hear things
  • Use light to help (move cattle from dark to
    light areas)
  • Avoid visual distractions
  • Herd behavior
  • Work in a curve
  • Use their flight zone
  • Consider working surface (footing)

60
RESPONSIBLE CULLINGImproves Herd Productivity
and Efficiency
61
CULLING TO ENHANCE QUALITY
  • ELIMINATE UNSOUNDNESS
  • FEET AND LEGS
  • UDDERS AND TEATS

PREGNANCY CHECKING
  • DISEASE MONITOR
  • PLANS FOR MARKETING
  • GROUPING OF NONFEDS

62
CULLING TO ENHANCE QUALITY
  • ELIMINATE BAD ACTORS
  • - Poorer gain in feedlot
  • - Jeopardize your own safety
  • - More prone to be dark cutters

63
Dark Cutters
  • Results from PRE-HARVEST stress on the animal,
    depleting muscle glycogen stores.
  • Meat is dark, firm and dry, and unacceptable to
    consumers.
  • Factors affecting dark cutting beef
  • Handling
  • Disposition
  • Genetics
  • Weather
  • Aggressive implants late in the feeding period

64
Dark Cutters (continued)
  • Number of incidences can be attributed to feedlot
    management, delivery time to the packer.
  • Implant administered less than 100 d prior to
    harvest.
  • Extreme weather (hot or cold) or cold weather
    with precipitation.
  • Mixing different pens of cattle together just
    prior to harvest.
  • Crowding Stress
  • Genetics temperament should be considered when
    selecting cattle!

65
Most Frequently Cited Problems With Cull Cows and
Bulls By Packers
Bruises Antibiotic Residues Birdshot /
Buckshot Arthritic Joints Yield (dress and
trim loss) Condition / Lameness Condemnation
Rate

1999 National Non-Fed Beef Quality Audit
66
PRODUCTS FROM NON- FED CATTLE
  • 25 OF BEEF CONSUMED
  • 20 OF PRODUCER INCOME
  • 89 ROUNDS ARE SOLD AS STEAK
  • 40 SIRLOINS ARE SOLD AS STEAK

67
EXTREME BODY CONDITION
  • 67 COWS 15 BULLS TOO THIN
  • BE AWARE OF DOWNER RISK
  • FEED 30-60 DAYS
  • WINTER OVER THEN FEED FOR MAXIMUM GAIN

68
EXTREME BODY CONDITION
  • 62 BULLS 28 COWS TOO BIG OR TOO FAT
  • SELECT FOR MEDIUM MATURE SIZE
  • EXTREME FAT SELL SOONER

69
Increasing Red Meat Yield
  • This topic is a concern with both Fed-beef and
    Market Cows and Bulls
  • Inadequate Muscling Excess Fat
  • (20.34) NBQA - 1995 (27.42)

70
Culling Management Points That Can Impact Public
Perception
Lumpy Jaw
Cancer Eye
Downers
Lameness
Market animals in a timely manner.
71
Key Management Action Points
  • FIND AND TREAT EARLY
  • RELIEVE PAIN
  • TREAT WOUND
  • REDUCE SWELLING
  • FEED WATER WELL
  • FIT TO EAT?
  • EUTHANIZE?
  • PRIVATE MARKET ASAP
  • USE PREVENTION GENETICS WHERE APPLICABLE

72
Think of Cows and Bulls as Part of the Beef Supply
  • 1. Consider injection sites
  • 2. Adhere to withdrawal times
  • 3. Feed cows and bulls correctly bruising occurs
    easier on emaciated cattle

73
Would you eat what you produce?
All cattle should be raised with the intent that
they will eventually be consumed as a food
product.
74
Suggestions for Improving Quality and Consistency
of Non-Fed Beef 3 Ms
  • Manage
  • Monitor
  • Market

75
Suggestions for Improving Quality and Consistency
of Non-Fed Beef 3 Ms
  • Manage to minimize defects
  • Dehorning
  • Give injections in neck
  • Monitor the health and condition of cattle
  • Dont ship cattle that may become nonambulatory
    (downer cattle)

76
Suggestions for Improving Quality and Consistency
of Non-Fed Beef 3 Ms
  • Market cattle in a timely manner
  • Cattle that contribute to consistency problems
    are
  • Too fat
  • Too lean
  • Too thin
  • Too heavy
  • Dont let cattle to get in poor condition before
    marketing them

77
Suggestions for Improving Quality and Consistency
of Non-Fed Beef 3 Ms
  • Sales of bulls and cows for slaughter
  • Account for 15 to 20 of producer revenues
  • 1994 Total domestic non-fed beef production
    topped 4.5 billion pounds
  • Non-fed beef represents 19 to 20 of total U.S.
    beef production
  • Cows generate 70 to 75 of non-fed beef

78
TARGETED BREEDINGEQUALS CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
79
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
  • USDA Quality Grade
  • Marbling
  • Maturity
  • Color Texture

80
USDA Quality Grade
Factors Affecting Marbling
  • Age
  • Days on feed
  • Genetics

81
USDA Quality Grade
Maturity Physiological age
Visual from cartilage ossification
82
USDA Quality Grade
Maturity Physiological age
MATURITY CALENDAR AGE
  • A 9 - 30 months
  • B 30 - 40 months (2 ½ - 3 ½yrs)
  • C 42 - 72 months (3 ½ - 6 yrs)
  • D 72 - 96 months (6 - 8 yrs)
  • E Over 96 months (8 yrs)

83
USDA Quality Grade
  • Texture Color
  • Bright red
  • Dark Cutter
  • Coarse Texture

84
USDA Quality Grade
85
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
  • USDA Yield Grade
  • Carcass Weight
  • Rib eye area
  • Adjusted Fat Thickness
  • Kidney, Pelvic Heart Fat

86
USDA Yield Grade
YIELD GRADE LEAN YIELD
  • 1 54.6
  • 2 52.3
  • 3 50.0
  • 4 47.7
  • 5 45.4

87
CARCASS GENETICS
CARCASS TRAIT(S) HERITABILITY
  • Carcass Weight .50
  • Quality grade .40
  • Marbling .35
  • Fat depth .45
  • Ribeye area .40
  • Yield grade .30
  • retail cuts .30
  • Muscling .45
  • Tenderness .50

88
COLLECTING CARCASS DATA
USE OF ULTRASOUND
89
Collect performance and carcass data on your
cattle. THE INFORMATION IS PRICELESS!
90
SPECIFYING EATING QUALITY
  • PORTION SIZE
  • TENDERNESS
  • PALATABILITY
  • EXCESSIVE FAT
  • CONSISTENCY AND UNIFORMITY

91
PORTION SIZE
  • SERVING SIZE CONTROL
  • SAME IN THE BOX

92
TENDERNESS
  • Genetics
  • Injection Sites
  • ?? Implants

93
PALATABILITY
  • Measured as a quality grade
  • Castrate young males as early as possible
  • Timely marketing to remove hard-boned cattle
  • Genetics

94
LIMIT EXCESSIVE FAT
  • Sort cattle into groups
  • Monitor time on feed
  • Timely marketing to reduce fat cover
  • Genetics
  • Reduces the amount of trim at harvest

95
CONSISTENCY AND UNIFORMITY
  • TARGET SIZE
  • WEIGHT
  • FRAME SIZE
  • BODY TYPE

KEEP THEM THE SAME
96
CONSISTENCY AND UNIFORMITY
  • IDEAL CARCASS CHARACTERISTICS
  • Carcass Weight 650 to 850 lbs
  • Back fat .30 to .45 in
  • Rib Eye Area 12.5 to 14 sq in
  • Yield Grade 1 or 2
  • Quality Grade Choice or higher

97
CONSISTENCY UNIFORMITY
  • Cow Herd
  • Avoid Extremes
  • Bull Selection
  • Uniformity
  • Replacement Females
  • Market large and small framed heifers
  • Select toward the average
  • Calving Interval
  • Shorten calving season

98
CONSISTENCY UNIFORMITY
  • Avoid Illness at Weaning
  • PROPER NUTRITION
  • PRE-WEANING VACCINATION
  • Immune system
  • 2-3 weeks before weaning

99
CONSISTENCY UNIFORMITY
  • SORT CATTLE INTO GROUPS
  • At Weaning
  • On Arrival at Feedlot
  • Timely Marketing

100
BQA is part of a changing Philosophy.
  • Participating in a BQA program can save you
    rather than cost you .
  • Its good business sense!
  • Its common sense!
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