Department of Human Services Office of Information Services - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Department of Human Services Office of Information Services PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 4a1b2-Nzk1N



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Department of Human Services Office of Information Services

Description:

... and Services. Advances in ... Vocational & Rehabilitation Services. Field Staff. Seniors and People ... Information Services. Policy & Planning. Project ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:165
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 84
Provided by: kwri
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Department of Human Services Office of Information Services


1
Department of Human ServicesOffice of
Information Services
  • Business Plan
  • November 2004

2
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

3
Purpose
Why the Business Plan? Serve as the departments
roadmap to engineer IT business processes, align
resources, and modernize our technologies
thereby delivering greater IT value to the
department.
4
BackgroundOrganizational Structure
DHS Overview
Director Gary Weeks Deputy Director Cindy Becker
  • Approximately 150 locations
  • 9,000 employees
  • 9.56B Department Budget (2005-2007)

Health Services Barry S. Kast Assistant DHS
Director Vacant Deputy
Updated 12/09/2004
5
BackgroundOrganizational Structure
DHS Functional Overview
  • Health Services
  • Oregon Health Plan
  • Mental Health Services
  • State Hospitals
  • Public Health
  • Addictive Treatment Prevention
  • Children, Adults and Families
  • Self Sufficiency Programs
  • Child Welfare Programs
  • Vocational Rehabilitation Services
  • Field Staff
  • Seniors and People with Disabilities
  • Services to Seniors
  • Services to People with Disabilities
  • Directors Office
  • Governors Advocacy Office
  • Internal Auditing
  • Office of Public Affairs
  • Tribal Relations
  • Information Services
  • Policy Planning
  • Project Management Office
  • Budget Administrative Services
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Application Maintenance Support
  • Strategic Systems Initiatives
  • Systems Architecture
  • Finance and Policy Analysis
  • Budget Sections
  • Forecasting Performance Measures
  • Federal Financial Policy
  • Rate Setting
  • Administrative Services
  • Human Resources
  • Contracts Procurement
  • Financial Services
  • Facilities
  • Forms Document Management
  • Information Security

6
Background Organizational Structure
DHS 2005 2011 Six Year Plan Long Term Strategies
  • Continuing the focus on service integration
  • Expanding the community infrastructure to provide
    prevention and treatment services that benefit
    clients and communities
  • Transforming the information systems of the
    department
  • Improving the credibility and accountability of
    the department
  • Addressing the expanding training needs of DHS
    employees and partners

Source DHS 2005-07 Agency Request Budget
7
Background Organizational Structure
Office of Information Services
2005-07 Agency Request Budget 386 Permanent
Positions
  • 288 ISS Technical
  • 44 Management
  • 28 Professional Technical
  • 16 Support

Executive Assistant Jane Malecky-Scott
OIS Admin
Network Computing Services Jim Long
Strategic Systems Initiatives Julie Mallord
Applications Maintenance Support Husain Razzaki
Customer Service Support Aaron Karjala
System Architecture Ed Klimowicz
  • Network Services
  • Computing Services
  • Major Projects
  • MMIS
  • SACWIS
  • HIPAA
  • GAP
  • Self Sufficiency
  • Home Care Worker
  • Hospital System Replacement
  • CAF
  • SPD
  • HS
  • DWSS
  • FPA
  • End User Computing
  • Desktop Maintenance Support
  • Help Desk
  • End-User Training
  • Change Management
  • IT Asset Management
  • Application Architecture
  • Data Resources Management
  • QA Testing

8
Background Resources
2003-2005 Legislatively Approved Budget
DHS Operating Budget 1.62 Billion
Total DHS Budget 9.22 Billion
OIS Project Budgets (MMIS, eXPRS) 72 million
(4.4)
Pass-through to clients communities 7.6
Billion (82.4)
DHS Operating Budget 1.62 Billion (17.6)
(DWSS, Field Services, State Hospitals, Public
Health)
OIS Operating Budget 76 million (4.7)
OIS Operating Budget 76 million
Hardware, Software, DP Services 37
Professional Services 2
Personnel 57
Operating SS 4
9
Background Resources
2005-2007 Governors Recommended Budget (estimate)
DHS Operating Budget 1.66 Billion
Total DHS Budget 9.56 Billion
OIS Project Budgets (MMIS, SACWIS) 90 million
(5.4)
Pass-through to clients communities 7.9
Billion (83.5)
DHS Operating Budget 1.66 Billion (16.5)
(DWSS, Field Services, State Hospitals, Public
Health)
OIS Operating Budget 80 million (4.8)
OIS Operating Budget 80 million
Hardware, Software, DP Services 38
Operating SS 6
Personnel 56
Updated 1/24/2005
10
Background Resources
Point of Fact
  • OIS appears to have sufficient resources
    available to serve the departmental requirements
  • Base operating budget is being supplemented to
    support major systems investments

People, processes, and technologies within OIS
need to be transformed to meet departmental
requirements and client needs
11
Background Burning Platform
Why Change?
  • Staff
  • Aging workforce loss of legacy system knowledge
    through workforce retirements
  • Fragmented staff skills due to increasingly
    complex IT environment
  • Decreasing staff morale unable to meet
    customers needs due to increasingly complex IT
    environment
  • Legacy system maintenance will require increased
    staff resources
  • Clients
  • Service to customers is degrading
  • Unable to meet customers changing needs
  • Clients become stuck in archaic processes for
    receiving services
  • Change request process becomes increasingly
    non-responsive increased requests, time to
    complete, and backlog
  • Increasingly difficult to integrate new
    technologies
  • Systems
  • Increasingly complex environment driving toward
    total maintenance / break-fix mode
  • Unable to support programs or deliver services
  • Increasingly difficult to modernize systems
  • No single view of client
  • No comprehensive data management or data
    interoperability
  • Complexity makes effective information security
    extremely difficult
  • Financial
  • Increased costs to maintain legacy systems and
    applications
  • Return on investment will be minimized
  • Budget is focused on operation and maintenance
    (utility), not modernization or innovation
    (transformation)

12
Plan Structure
Point of Departure
Point of Arrival
Strategies
Customer Relations Technical Complexity Modernizat
ion Computing Network Infrastructure
Consolidation (CNIC) Standardize Processes Buy
before Build Skills Transformation Culture Change
Achievement of Performance Goals through people,
processes, and technology Increased public value
of IT
Assessment / Issues
Burning Platform
13
Background Methodology
  • Assessment Point of Departure A description
    and metrics-based assessment of the current
    environment. The assessment is designed to
    achieve a common understanding of the plans
    point of departure.
  • Issues The assessment identifies a series of
    issues that the organization needs to address.
  • Strategies These are high level descriptions of
    the actions the organization plans to undertake
    to achieve our vision and point of arrival.
  • Vision Point of Arrival This is a description
    of the future state we expect to achieve as a
    result of successfully implementing our
    strategies. It is the basis for measuring our
    achievement of the plan.

14
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

15
Application PortfolioPoint of Departure -
Assessment
  • Complex Application Development Environment
  • 250 applications
  • 22 programming languages
  • 9 database management systems
  • 5 platform types
  • Application development, maintenance, and support
    requires more than the current 189 people

16
Application Portfolio Point of Departure -
Assessment
Largest, Most Complex Applications
Largest, most complex applications use a variety
of technologies
7
languages
database types
5
3
platforms
17
Application Portfolio Point of Departure -
Assessment
Adapted from IBM Presentation at 2004 APHSA
Conference
18
Application Portfolio Point of Departure -
Assessment
Multiple Applications performing similar
functionality written in different languages
increases the effort of support
19
Application Portfolio Point of Departure -
Assessment
New projects increase the of budget spent on
maintenance operations in subsequent years,
leaving less money for innovation modernization
Adapted from Driving and Communicating Your
Leadership Vision by John Goggin, Metagroup 2003
20
Application Portfolio Issues
  • Systems inhibit both business operations and
    service integration across clusters and business
    units
  • IT staff have fragmented skill sets and lack
    depth
  • Increased costs of ownership
  • Greater resource drain to support applications
  • Increased timeframe needed to implement changes
  • Duplication of functionality
  • Lack of standardization
  • Business processes are diverse and evolving, yet
    dependent on inflexible applications

21
Application Portfolio Strategy
  • Portfolio management strategy
  • Use of Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS)
    Applications (Buy vs. Build)
  • Develop staff skills to support future
    integration requirements (Implementers vs.
    Developers)
  • Implement generic solutions modifications based
    on solid business case
  • Integrated technical architecture
  • Common client database holistic single view of
    clients
  • Prototypes/demonstration projects time,
    expense, and business risk mitigation strategy
  • Migration strategy for legacy applications with
    replacement initiatives freeze current systems
    when new initiatives started
  • Sunset plans for old applications

22
Application Portfolio Strategy
  • Portfolio Strategy Portfolios are defined by
    business requirements, functions, and programs

23
Application Portfolio Point of Arrival
  • Portfolio of integrated COTS applications
  • Implement best practices
  • Meet Federal requirements
  • Configured installed but not heavily modified
  • Holistic single view of client
  • Staff skills support business integration
    requirements
  • Leverage statewide opportunities
  • Service-oriented architecture (open access,
    integrated, rules-based, etc.)
  • IT responsive to business process improvements

24
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

25
Data Architecture Point of Departure - Assessment
Databases by Type
Databases by Cluster
More than 9 types of databases requiring a
diverse skill set to maintain
Minimal Integrated Data (especially Client
Provider)
26
Data Architecture Point of Departure -
Assessment
26 Desktop Databases
  • Cannot have simultaneous multiple users
  • Data may not be backed up, current, or accurate

86 Non-Standard Databases
  • Creates complexity in processes and procedures
  • Difficult to share data

27
Data Architecture Point of Departure -
Assessment
DHS has Over 3 Terabytes of Data (equal to
2,184,533 diskettes)
DHS has 59 Client Databases
  • No single view of client
  • Inconsistent data quality
  • Few common data definitions

28
Data Architecture Issues
  • Complexity
  • Disparate platforms
  • Disparate databases
  • Multiple data management processes
  • Lack of tools and methods to manage information
  • Minimal integrated data
  • Inconsistent data quality
  • Duplicate data entry and maintenance
  • Diverse skill sets required
  • Complex security requirements

29
Data Architecture Strategy
  • Reduce Complexity through
  • Business process improvement simplification
  • Implementing data quality, management, and
    interoperability processes
  • Implementing enterprise tools and methods
  • Standards, compliance and enforcement
  • Develop integrated data architecture
  • Develop DBA skills for anticipated future
    requirements

30
Data Architecture Point of Arrival
  • Standardized data management infrastructure
  • Single data entry and easy data accessibility
  • Fully integrated client, provider, partner data
  • Standardized agency metadata, data elements, and
    data dictionary
  • Standardized reporting tool set
  • Accurate, consistent, timely, and reliable data
  • Data warehouse(s) to support analysis
  • Staff skills to support business integration
    requirements

31
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

32
Network and Computing Services Point of
Departure - Assessment
  • Environment Supported
  • 338 servers
  • 9 operating systems
  • 239 data circuits
  • 159 to DHS field offices
  • 80 to DHS partner offices (Counties, AAAs,
    etc)
  • Transaction Volume per biennium
  • 2.7 billion CICS transactions
  • 214,000 batch jobs
  • 10,900 miles of paper printed
  • Storage
  • 10 terabytes of total storage

Over 140 distinct skills needed to support the
current environment
33
Network and Computing Services Point of
Departure - Assessment
338 identified servers supported in a variety of
locations
Types of servers within DHS Data Center
34
Network and Computing Services Point of
Departure - Assessment
35
Network and Computing Services Issues
  • No disaster recovery / business continuity plan/
    critical infrastructure protection (CIP) plan
  • Limited support of 24 x 7 operations
  • Splintered and lack of depth of staff knowledge
  • Limited / Non-optimal facilities
  • Power capacity issues in the DHS Data Center
  • Physical space issues in the DHS Data Center
  • Power and HVAC issues at PSOB and Parkway
  • Significant security vulnerabilities
  • Insufficient monitoring and management tools
  • Interconnectivity issues with other state agencies

36
Network and Computing Services Strategy
  • Short Term (before CNIC consolidation)
  • Maintain best effort in server consolidation
  • Upgrade mainframe operating system to level of
    other state agencies
  • Increase staff skills with targeted training
    activities
  • CNIC Initiative Participate in and fully
    support CNIC
  • Subsequent to Consolidation
  • Service coordination between DHS and consolidated
    data center
  • Provide service level management for those
    services contracted for with the consolidated
    center
  • Develop and implement business continuity plans
    to include disaster recovery statewide and local

37
Network and Computing Services Point of Arrival
  • Fully consolidated network and computing
    environment
  • State-of-the-art facility
  • Defense-in-depth security posture
  • Active participant in shared service
    environment
  • Increased availability (24 x 7)
  • Scalable infrastructure
  • Implemented and supported development, test,
    training, and production environments
  • Business Continuity Plan including Disaster
    Recovery Plan and process to update

38
Network and Computing Services Point of Arrival
Proposed CNIC Facility
SOURCE YOST GRUBE HALL, ARCHITECTS
39
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

40
Customer Service and Support Point of Departure
- Assessment
  • 150 locations supported
  • Customer Service and Support Staff Ratios
  • Field Techs 1 per 143 customers and 155
    desktops
  • Help Desk 1 per 380 customers and 382 desktops
  • Help Desk services
  • 6,000 tickets per month (Sep 04) vs. 3,500
    tickets (Mar 02)
  • 2003 Help Desk survey 85 satisfaction rate
  • Help Desk resolution
  • Tickets resolved at Help Desk 72 (Sep 04) vs.
    42 (Mar 02)
  • First call resolution rate 49 (Sep 04) vs. 11
    (Mar 02)

41
Customer Service and Support Point of Departure
- Assessment
6,726 desktops sampled
Support 69 unique desktop images on multiple
operating systems
High percentage of outdated desktops
42
Customer Service and Support Point of Departure
- Assessment
Non-Standard or Unapproved Software Installations
  • Printers
  • Personal Printers
  • 500-600 Installations
  • Network Printers
  • 1,105 total printers
  • 44 different models

Collected from Web Jet-admin (HP printers only)
Over 18,000 instances of non-standard or
unapproved software on desktops
43
Customer Service and Support Issues
  • Staffing Environment
  • Customer ownership of staff (resistance to
    moving specific staff)
  • Unbalanced workload
  • Demand for increasingly complex services
  • Wide variety of non-standard and outdated
    hardware and software
  • Asset Management
  • No central repository
  • License compliance issues
  • Inefficient software distribution
  • Manual generation of compliance reports
  • Software usage not tracked
  • Manual software distribution

44
Customer Service and Support Issues
  • Processes
  • Not standardized or integrated with related
    processes
  • Inefficient too many steps, too many touch
    points
  • No Customer Support Plan
  • Break/fix service heavily dependent upon site
    visits

45
Customer Service and Support Strategy
  • Integrate and consolidate processes
  • Single point of contact for OIS services
    Consolidated Service Desk with tiered support
  • Service Level Management and coordination
  • Publish and maintain a catalog of OIS services
  • Move from reactive to proactive customer support
  • Expand change management and problem management
    processes
  • Increase/improve specialized training for
    application releases
  • Automate workstation maintenance system
  • Implement user-friendly customer self-help system
  • Central dispatching and scheduling of Field
    technicians
  • Implement remote management techniques - software
    installs, remote control of desktops

46
Customer Service and Support Point of Arrival
  • Comprehensive customer support plan completely
    integrated, consolidated processes
  • Add, Move/Modify, Delete
  • Incident Management
  • Problem Management
  • Change Management
  • Asset Management
  • Release Management
  • Proactive customer support services
  • Adaptable, flexible and responsive customer
    service

47
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

48
Staff Skills Point of Departure - Assessment
Current Skills
49
Staff Skills Point of Departure - Assessment
  • Little or no financial incentive for technical
    staff to move into management positions
  • Need to identify staff with management interest
    and skills early to provide appropriate career
    path

50
Staff Skills Point of Departure - Assessment
IT Professionals In-House Skill Trends
Source Research Assessment of Needed In House
Skills Trend for IT Professionals by Gartner
51
Staff Skills Issues
  • Current skill sets do not match anticipated
    future needs
  • Need to change staff mix from developers to
    implementers, integrators, and process experts
  • Difficult to change mix of skill sets within
    current labor/management constraints
  • Limited career management processes
  • No formal system to guide individuals between
    technical and management careers

52
Staff Skills Strategy
  • Train current employees in new technologies
  • Establish career paths for employees
  • Use vacant positions and new hiring to move
    toward anticipated future needs
  • Increase use of developmental, job rotations and
    work-out-of-class assignments to develop future
    skills
  • Increase use of contracted skills to provide
    flexibility and rapid response outside of OIS
    core capabilities

53
Staff SkillsPoint of Arrival
Current Skills
Anticipated Skills
54
Staff Skills Point of Arrival
  • Staff training, development, and hiring practices
    provide needed capacity
  • Better business process analysts
  • Solution implementers and integrators
  • Stronger contract management skills
  • Continued emphasis on project management
    practices
  • Staff are more flexible, adaptive, responsive,
    and receptive to change

55
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

56
Security Point of Departure - Assessment
  • Confidentiality
  • Security consciousness is not consistent
  • Evolving federal state security requirements
    create new security challenges
  • Integrity
  • Lack defense-in-depth posture
  • Difficult to secure systems due to their
    complexity
  • Antiquated security mechanisms built into
    antiquated applications
  • Accessibility
  • Insufficient password management process
  • Lack of role-based access

57
Security Point of Departure - Assessment
Firewall
Partners
Internet
The internet is the connection to the world
Server
Server
Data / Application
Perimeter
Partners
Server
Server
The perimeter separates the DHS network
computers from the internet
Intranet
The intranet connects our computing systems
Our World
58
SecurityIssues
  • Complex system configurations compromise
    sensitive client data
  • Potential loss of service to systems and networks
  • Ability to remain compliant with State and
    Federal Regulations (HIPAA)
  • Potential loss of credibility as a result of
    compromises and loss of service

59
Security Strategies
  • Implement a mature security training and
    awareness program
  • Implement corrective actions that will increase
    security in the short term facilitate the
    transition to the statewide Computing
    Networking Infrastructure Consolidation (CNIC)
  • Participation in the Computing Networking
    Infrastructure Consolidation (CNIC) security
    requirements and standards
  • Standardization of computer equipment and
    settings
  • Network monitoring and system auditing
  • Policies procedures
  • CNIC migration
  • Implement defense-in-depth processes

60
SecurityPoint of Arrival
Partners
Partners
Firewall
Routing partners through firewalls does not limit
authorized access
DMZ Firewall
Internet
Data / Application
Server
Server
The internet is the connection to the world
Perimeter
Server
Server
The perimeter separates the DHS network
computers from the internet
Intranet
The intranet connects our computing systems
Our World
61
Security Point of Arrival
  • Defense-in-depth security posture
  • Security awareness and training program
  • Workforce and partners understand and practice
    security measures
  • Secure perimeter, intranet, servers,
    applications, and data
  • Threats are detected and mitigated before
    becoming incidents
  • Risk mitigation strategies
  • Business users and partners control identity and
    access management
  • Business Continuity Plans, to include Disaster
    Recovery, are in place and updated according to
    change management procedures

62
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

63
Customer RelationsPoint of Departure - Assessment
  • Existing technology inhibits customers
    improvement of business processes
  • Backlog of application change requests estimated
    to exceed two years current technologies
    expensive to maintain
  • Lack of clear customer relationship management
    processes
  • Multiple contact points
  • Shopping for solutions
  • Black hole syndrome
  • Lack of confidence and trust
  • Inability to leverage advances in technology
  • Not staying up with emerging technologies
  • Difficult to integrate new technologies with old
    systems

64
Customer RelationsIssues
  • Lack of confidence and trust OISs
    responsibility for leadership in implementing
    emerging technologies is unclear
  • Lack of a sense of urgency to address IT issues
    real and/or perceived
  • No common understanding of Roles
    Responsibilities
  • Lack of a clear IT Governance Model
  • Not all clusters and business units have a
    priority-setting process through their ISMs
  • Priority setting committees operate with
    different charters and expectations
  • No common understanding of the role of OIS
  • No common understanding of who owns the IT
    resources
  • Systems lack flexibility to adapt to changing
    business requirements

65
Customer RelationsStrategy
  • Implement Information Technology Governance
    Council (ITGC) Charter
  • Implement Information Systems Management (ISM)
    and OIS Roles and Responsibilities as defined by
    ITGC
  • Implement OIS Communications Plan to build
    confidence and trust
  • Establish modernization strategies for
    applications, desktops, and tools
  • Ownership The What the How
  • Clusters and business units own the What
  • OIS owns the How
  • Transform OIS to an enabling leadership role

66
Customer RelationsPoint of Arrival
  • Effective governance structure
  • OIS facilitates a shared vision and provides
    expertise to create the best solutions
  • OIS performance metrics are aligned with
    departmental vision, mission, and goals in an
    effort to manage customer expectations
  • OIS is an enabler, providing citizen-centric
    approach to public value
  • OIS is service-oriented and proactive in
    providing improved customer service delivery
  • OIS is a catalyst for business process improvement

67
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

68
Organizational Culture Point of Departure -
Assessment
  • Care deeply about DHS Mission Goals
  • I and Us-Them paradigms dominate
  • Lack of awareness and knowledge to build a We
    culture
  • Scarcity mindset
  • Risk adverse and resistant to change
  • Compliance paradigm dominates (parental vs.
    adult-to-adult)
  • Problem solving largely focused on single events
    failure to practice systematic thinking
    methodologies

69
Organizational Culture Issues
  • Cynicism and resignation regarding the
    possibility of change
  • Lack of alignment
  • Ineffective decision-making, revisiting
    decisions, and no enforcement mechanism
  • End runs at all levels
  • Inconsistent accountability
  • Insufficient trust

70
Organizational Culture Strategy
  • Expand our capacity to form a we culture
  • Build a results-based, accountable culture
  • Implement strategic management development
    process
  • Promote informal networks that positively shape
    our culture

71
Organizational Culture Point of Arrival
  • Culture aligned to vision, mission, and guiding
    principles integral to daily work
  • Initiative, innovation and creativity is inherent
    and valued
  • Flexible, dynamic, and responsive culture
  • Recognize change as the constant, the degree of
    change as the variable
  • We culture recognized high respect and high
    trust
  • Leadership, management, and staff embrace and
    support the learning continuum for all

72
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

73
Customer Business Functions
  • DHS organizational groups provided information
    about their specific program areas
  • Program areas have specific rules and
    requirements that their business functions must
    address
  • __________________________________________________
    ___
  • Public Health conducted a detailed assessment
  • 91 Program Areas
  • 62 Business Functions (check writing, billing,
    referral, etc.)
  • Public Health found that while their program
    rules and requirements are specific, many of
    their functions are similar across program areas

74
Customer Business Functions
Different business rules surrounding a business
function do not change it
Different business processes can have the same
business function within them
Business Process Elements
  • Business Rules
  • Inputs
  • Why check is written
  • What is written on the check (date, name, amount,
    comments)
  • Business Rules
  • Outputs
  • Where check is sent
  • Where how check info recorded

10 check writing applications in 5 different
languages
75
Customer Business Functions DHS Business Groups
76
Customer Business Functions Public Health
Public Health is comprised of the following
program offices and program areas
77
Customer Business Functions Public Health
Public Health identified the business functions
used most often in their program areas (for
example Screening is used in 54 Program Areas)
  • 91 Program Areas
  • 62 Business Functions

78
Table of Contents
  • Purpose
  • Background
  • Organizational Structure
  • Resources
  • Burning Platform
  • Methodology
  • Detailed Assessment
  • Application Portfolio
  • Data Architecture
  • Network Computing Services
  • Customer Service Support
  • Staff
  • Security
  • Customer Relations
  • Culture
  • Customer Business Functions
  • OIS Products and Services
  • Advances in Technologies
  • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

79
OIS Products and Services
80
Advances in Technologies
Benefits to DHS
Technology
Strategies for Use
  • Most of technologies listed are already available
    some of these technologies will become
    mainstream in the next 2 to 10 years
  • Position IT infrastructure to be in a position to
    take advantage of these technologies where they
    can be used for achieving the DHS Mission
  • Staff hardware mobility productivity from
    room to room, office to office, during travel, or
    from the field
  • The ability of clients to use such things as the
    internet, telephones, kiosks, card readers to
    receive their benefits services
  • Staff partners ability to access DHS systems
    via the web. Clients ability to monitor or
    receive their benefits services.
  • Wireless PDAs, Smartphones, Speech recognition
    for desktop
  • Wireless
  • Self Service
  • Web Enabled
  • Convergent Technologies
  • Open Source
  • Speech Recognition
  • Mobile Computing
  • Natural Language Search

81
Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats
Factors Internal to OIS
  • Strengths
  • OIS Executive leadership has a clear vision
  • Committed to the DHS Mission and Goals
  • Department supports modernization and integration
    of systems
  • Weaknesses
  • Staff management do not have needed skills mix
    for modernization
  • Difficult to transition systems maintain
    operations
  • Culture is resistant to change and risk adverse

Factors External to OIS
  • Opportunities
  • CNIC will modernize DHS infrastructure enhance
    security
  • IT will be better aligned more flexible to DHS
    business
  • DHS 2005-07 budget supports DHS systems
    modernization integration
  • Threats
  • Budget shortfall would extend timelines
  • Culture resistant to change
  • Requires sweeping changes in how OIS DHS
    conduct their functions processes

82
Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats
Threats That Can Disrupt DHS Efforts
83
Recognition
  • Thanks to all those whose time and effort led to
    the creation of this Business Plan
  • Special thanks goes out to
  • The Policy and Planning Workgroup (Nancy
    McIntyre, Terry Guza, Darren Wellington, and
    Brent Freeman) who spent countless hours
    coordinating the creation of this document
  • Tammy Roberts who facilitated the offsite
    executive staff meeting and whose input was
    invaluable
  • Steve Modesitt and Public Health Staff who
    provided a comprehensive evaluation of their
    business functions
About PowerShow.com