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2008 Summer Sports Manual

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Title: 2008 Summer Sports Manual


1
Mary Persons Strength and Conditioning
IRON
DOGS
Summer 2008
Train like Champions
Luke 648
2
2008 SUMMER SPORTS MANUAL "THE STRONG SHALL
PERSEVERE"
  • Mary Persons High School
  • Strength and Conditioning

3
Table of Contents Bulldog Pride
  • Staff Information
  • MP Strength Staff Letter
  • Training Concepts
  • Mission Statement/Philosophies
  • Athletic Trainer Letter
  • Summer Programs
  • Baseball
  • W. Basketball/M. Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Football
  • W. Soccer/M. Soccer
  • Softball
  • Volleyball
  • Agility
  • Conditioning
  • Plyometrics
  • Flexibility
  • Nutrition
  • Exercise Techniques

4
Mary Persons High School Bulldog Athletics
Letter from Coaching Staff
MP Coaches, Congratulations on a great year!
This is your 2008 MP summer manual to help your
team develop the necessary components needed to
be successful in their upcoming season. The
success your team is going to enjoy depends
greatly on what your team does physically to
prepare in the summer. Your program begins on
June 6th and ends the last week in July. Use the
provided program and variety of drills provided
to prepare your team. The manual contains the
techniques, conditioning drills, agility drills,
flexibility routines, nutritional information
and a GOAL SHEET. View the GOAL SHEET often to
help your team reach full potential. Coaches
you will find there is little time to develop the
needed skills once school starts due to time
conflicts. Therefore, it is imperative to
follow the provided program in order to achieve
your teams goals. It is up to each individual
athlete on your team to put forth the effort,
discipline, dedication, and commitment to prepare
for their teams season. Mary Persons has a
strong athletic tradition and it is your teams
job to carry on with this tradition. Once again,
be consistent in following this program. If you
have questions do not hesitate to call us at the
field house or at 706-372-3471. Stay focused and
come ready to compete in the fall. Good Luck and
GO DAWGS! MP Strength Conditioning Staff
5
Mission Statement Bulldog Pride
  • The Mary Persons High School Strength and
    Conditioning Program is a fundamental component
    in developing a well-balanced athlete for all
    Bulldog athletic teams.
  • The mission of the Mary Persons High School
    Strength and Conditioning Program is to provide
    to our athletes the means by which they develop
    work ethic, attitude, mental toughness,
    discipline, intensity, competitiveness, and
    pride.
  • Our coaching staff and administrators believe
    that a research-based designed speed, strength,
    and conditioning program is the key to developing
    the well-rounded athlete but more importantly a
    successful team with a shared vision.
  • Mary Persons High School Strength and
    Conditioning Program works to incorporate ideas
    and concepts that have been researched, tested,
    and proven to benefit athletes. Our program is
    athlete focused and designed to provide our
    athletes an edge over our competition.

6
MP Strength and Conditioning Training
Philosophy Two Primary Goals
  • Increase Athletic Performance in Competition
  • Reduce the opportunity for injury.

To accomplish our goals we adhere to the
following guidelines
Emphasize Olympic-style exercises -correlate to
game specific movements -increase power
output/force production Development of power and
speed potential -multi-directional through all
planes of motion -deceleration and acceleration
Closed chain/Sport-specific exercises -free
weight exercises/multi-joint exercises -unilatera
l and core development Annual Periodization -tran
sitions through yearly cycle -adapts to
rigors/demands of sport Energy System
Training -training for demands of sport Total
body Mobility/Flexibility Training -increase
range of motion and decrease injury Mental
Preparation - intensity and tempo
7
MP Strength and Conditioning Coaching Philosophy
  • The Mary Persons Strength and Conditioning
    coaching philosophies are derived from past work
    and play experience. Our coaches strive to be
    great teachers, great motivators and demand
    mental toughness, discipline, and great effort.
  • The coaching staff has a responsibility to set
    the standard, mold the attitude and character,
    and set the intensity and direction of each
    player.
  • The coaching staff will devise and implement a
    program with the goal of developing a
    functionally strong and explosive athlete using a
    variety of resistance and speed training
    protocols. Our belief is there is no quick fix
    for hard work produces success.

MP Integrity Often doing the right thing is the
not the easiest, most popular, or most rewarding
course of action. Society suggests its okay to
tell little lies, fudge the numbers, or break
commitments. While these actions may make life
easier or lead to short-term benefits, they erode
our integrity. Doing right may not always be
applauded, but that does not mean we should avoid
it. Michael Wiggins- FCA 2008
8
MP Strength and Conditioning Sports Medicine
  • Bulldog Coaches,
  • Here are some thoughts from Doc that will aid
    you in preparation for your upcoming season
  • Nutrition
  • Weight Gain Increase caloric intake add a snack
    between each meal. Example meals could include
    but are not limited to PB and J sandwich protein
    shake with fruit fresh fruit protein bar 1
    glass of milk before bed. Stay away from
    candy, sweets, and food high in fat content.
  • Weight Loss Decrease calories and increase
    aerobic exercise (running for distance or bike
    riding) stay away from breads, sweets, sugar,
    and fatty snacks. It takes serious discipline to
    lose weight. You have to want to CHANGE. Milk
    drinkers need to switch to skim milk. NO JUNK
    FOODS!
  • Maintain The best way to maintain good
    nutrition is to eat a balanced diet. Eat less
    sugar and sweets intake more fresh fruits and
    vegetables. Stay away from junk foods because
    they are high in caloric intake and do not
    provide the body much usable energy sources.
  • II. Injury Prevention Warm-up session

  • Warm-up
  • Before a workout starts, jog three to five
    minutes to get the body warm and
  • blood flowing to the muscles.
  • Do a complete stretching routine for all the
    major muscles groups that will be
  • used in the training session.
  • Dynamic flexibility is needed because it will
    take athlete through range of
  • motion encountered in the training session.
  • If you use static stretching, stretch all major
    muscle groups and hold for a
  • ten fifteen second count.

9
MP Strength and Conditioning Sports Medicine
  • Cool down- After your training session, perform
    either a session of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular
    Facilitation (PNF- partner stretching) or static
    stretching.
  • Post workout stretches are key increase blood
    flow through the muscles, which will aid in the
    restoration of muscles after a training session.
  • During the cool down, stretching must be
    monitored and insist on proper technique from
    athletes. Many strains and sprains that occur due
    to tight muscles during the season can be
    prevented during this time by increasing joint
    and muscle range of motion.
  • For example, key emphasis should be
    placed on the lower back and
  • hamstring area (posterior chain).
  • III. Hydration
  • Heat Humidity Heavy workouts DEHYDRATION
    FATIGUE
  • In order to offset the factors of dehydration and
    fatigue athletes must intake plenty of water.
    Avoid drinking anything with caffeine (tea,
    coffee, sodas, energy drinks) or high sugar
    content (Kool-aid, sodas, etc.)
  • Sports drinks- the purpose of sports drinks
    (PowerAde and Gatorade) are to hydrate the body
    with fluids and to replace electrolytes. One key
    misconception is that these are the only route to
    take in combating dehydration. In actuality,
    sports drinks are high in sugar content which can
    impede hydration.
  • In truth, a combination of these types drinks
    and water is best. It is essential to increase
    water intake as the intensity and volume of
    workouts increase.
  • Athletes should make it a goal to intake at least
    one gallon of water a day. Every time they walk
    by a water fountain they should take a drink.
    They cannot drink to much water.
  • In order to increase sodium levels, add pinch of
    salt to foods. Pickle juice is another pliable
    option for increasing sodium intake.

10
MP Strength and Conditioning
Summer Programs To become a champion, you must
first train like a champion
11
MP Baseball Bulldog Pride
Phase Hypertrophy Length 6 weeks
(summer) -adapt to meet summer league
schedule Schedule (days a week) Weight room-
3 Conditioning- 3 Speed/agility work-
2 Testing Date July 2008 Program Goals
-increase muscle size/mass -increase overall
strength measures - cross-sectional area
-increase lean body mass - ability to
create force -instill tempo in training
sessions -improve range of motion -increase
mental desire for weight room -implement
prehabilitation exercises -develop
accountability and leadership - shoulder
girdle/rotator cuff -TRAIN LIKE
CHAMPIONS -improve techniques of lifts -
Olympic (power development) - Core
(multi-joint) Dominant Energy Systems
Anaerobic alactic Energy system distribution
Anaerobic 95 Anaerobic alactic 5 Training
Objectives Max. Strength throwing power
acceleration power reaction
12
MP Basketball Bulldog Pride
Phase Hypertrophy (H)/ Max Strength
(MS) Length (H) 6 weeks (summer)/(MS) Fall
2008 -adapt to meet summer camp
schedule Schedule (days a week) Weight room-
3/Plyometrics- 2 Conditioning-
3 Speed/agility work- 2 Testing Date July
2008 Program Goals -increase muscle size/mass
-increase lean body mass - cross-sectional
area -improve range of motion - ability to
create force -instill tempo in training
sessions -increase overall strength measures
-increase mental desire for weight room -improve
techniques of lifts -introduce Plyometric
exercises -implement prehabilitation exercises
-deceleration/acceleration drills - Olympic
(power development) -TRAIN LIKE CHAMPIONS -
Core (multi-joint) Dominant Energy Systems
Anaerobic alactic, lactic acid, aerobic Energy
System Distribution 60 alactic 20 lactic
acid 20 aerobic Training Objectives
Hypertrophy/Max. Strength take off power
acceleration power power
endurance
13
MP Cheerleading Bulldog Spirit
Phase Hypertrophy (H)/ Power (P) Length (H)
6 weeks (summer)/(P) Fall 2008 -adapt to meet
summer camps Schedule (days a week) Weight
room- 3-4/Plyometrics- 2 Conditioning-
3-4/Circuit training- 1-2 Testing Date July
2008 Program Goals -increase muscle size
-increase muscle endurance - cross-sectional
area -increase lean body mass -increase overall
strength measures -improve range of
motion -instill tempo in training session
-use flexibility pretest/posttest
measures -implement prehabilitation exercises
-increase mental desire for weight room -improve
techniques of lifts -introduce Plyometric
exercises - Olympic (power development)
-develop accountability and leadership -
Core (multi-joint) -TRAIN LIKE
CHAMPIONS Dominant Energy Systems Anaerobic
alactic, lactic acid, aerobic Energy System
Distribution 65 alactic 25 lactic acid 10
aerobic Training Objectives Hypertrophy/Max.
Strength take off power acceleration
power reaction power
14
MP Football Bulldog Pride
Phase Max Strength (MS) Length (MS) 6 weeks
(summer) -adapt to meet summer camp
schedule Schedule Weight room- 3/Plyometrics-
2 (days a week) Conditioning- 3-4 Speed/agility
work- 2 Testing Date July 2008 Program Goals
-increase muscle size/mass -increase overall
strength measures - cross-sectional area
-increase lean body mass -improve range of
motion (posterior chain) -instill tempo in
training sessions -implement prehabilitation
exercises -increase mental desire for weight
room -improve techniques of lifts -increase
volume of plyometric exercises - Olympic
(power development) - Core
(multi-joint) -increase volume of plyometric
exercises -develop accountability and
leadership -TRAIN LIKE CHAMPIONS Lineman Dominant
Energy Systems Anaerobic alactic, lactic
acid Energy System Distribution 70 alactic
30 lactic acid Training Objectives
Hypertrophy/Max. Strength take off power
starting power reaction power Skill Dominant
Energy Systems Anaerobic alactic, lactic
acid Energy System Distribution 60 alactic
30 lactic acid 10 aerobic Training Objectives
Max. Strength acceleration power reaction
power starting power
15
MP Soccer Bulldog Pride
Phase Anatomical Adaptation (AA)/Hypertrophy Le
ngth (AA) (H) 6 weeks (summer)/Hypertrophy
Fall 2008 -adapt to meet summer camp
(s) Schedule (days a week) Weight room-
2-3 Conditioning- 3-4 Speed/agility work-
2 Testing Date July 2008 Program Goals
-increase muscle size/mass -increase lean body
mass - cross-sectional area -improve range
of motion - ability to create force
-instill tempo in training sessions -increase
overall strength measures -increase mental
desire for weight room -improve techniques of
lifts -introduce Plyometric exercises -implement
prehabilitation exercises -deceleration/accelera
tion drills - Olympic (power development) -
increase aerobic work capacity - Core
(multi-joint) - TRAIN LIKE CHAMPIONS Dominant
Energy Systems Anaerobic alactic, lactic acid,
aerobic Energy System Distribution 15 alactic
15 lactic acid 70 aerobic Training Objectives
power power endurance acceleration/deceleration
reactive power aerobic capacity
16
MP Softball Bulldog Pride
Phase Max Strength/Conversion to Power Length
6 weeks (summer)/Fall 2008 Conversion -adapt
to meet summer league schedule Schedule (days
a week) Weight room- 3 Conditioning-
3 Speed/agility work- 2 Testing Date July
2008 Program Goals -increase muscle size/mass
-increase overall strength measures -
cross-sectional area -increase lean body mass
- ability to create force -instill tempo
in training sessions -improve range of motion
-increase mental desire for weight
room -implement prehabilitation exercises
-develop accountability and leadership -
shoulder girdle/rotator cuff -TRAIN LIKE
CHAMPIONS -improve techniques of lifts -
Olympic (power development) - Core
(multi-joint) Dominant Energy Systems
Anaerobic alactic Energy system distribution
Anaerobic 95 Anaerobic alactic 5 Training
Objectives Max. Strength throwing power
acceleration power reaction
17
MP Volleyball Bulldog Pride
Phase Max Strength (MS)/ Conversion to Power
(CP) Length (MS)/(CP) 6 weeks
(summer)/Power-Maintenance Fall 2008 -adapt to
meet summer camp schedule Schedule (days a
week) Weight room- 3-4/Plyometrics-
2 Conditioning- 3-4 Speed/agility work-
2 Testing Date July 2008 Program Goals
-increase muscle size/mass -increase lean body
mass - cross-sectional area -improve range
of motion - ability to create force
-instill tempo in training sessions -increase
overall strength measures -increase mental
desire for weight room -improve techniques of
lifts -introduce Plyometric exercises -implement
prehabilitation exercises -deceleration/accelera
tion drills - Olympic (power development)
-TRAIN LIKE CHAMPIONS - Core
(multi-joint) Dominant Energy Systems
Anaerobic alactic, lactic acid, aerobic Energy
System Distribution 60-65 alactic 30 lactic
acid 5-10 aerobic Training Objectives Max.
Strength power power endurance muscular
endurance
18
Mary Persons High School Strength and
Conditioning Goal Sheet
Goal setting is a valuable technique used to
assist athletes in their quest for success. This
past off-season you were tested in the below
areas and in preseason at the end of summer you
will be tested again to see how much you have
improved. By training and working hard this
summer you will have the opportunity to improve
you athletic potential. It is up to you to put
in the effort that it will take to get better!
Below is a list of measures that you can use
through out the summer to see how you are
improving. Motivate yourself and follow your
daily program and you will have no problem
competing in the fall! Winners compare their
achievements with their goals, while losers
compare their achievements with those of other
people. Nido Qubein Test Present
Goal Body Weight __________ __________ Body
Fat Percent __________ __________ Power
Clean __________ __________ Parallel
Squat __________ __________ Bench
Press __________ __________ 300 yard
shuttle __________ __________ 40 yard
sprint __________ __________ Pro-agility ______
____ __________ DAWG agility __________ _______
___ LOOK AT THESE GOALS DAILY SEE YOURSELF
MAKING THESE GOALS WORK HARD TO MAKE IT
HAPPEN
19
MP Strength and Conditioning
Agility Action is predicated on having an
intention, in which you know what you want and
set out to achieve it.
20
Agility What is Agility?
Agility The National Strength and Conditioning
Association (NSCA) describes agility as the
ability to change direction of the body or body
parts rapidly under control (Baechle, 1994). The
ability to stop and change direction quickly is
an obvious example of a physical characteristic
that is related to all sports. Few sports
require speed in only a straight-line movement.
Therefore, training agility that simulates game
specific movements and contractions under similar
circumstances is an essential training method
(Foran, 2001) The term agility cannot be defined
in a single definition. It encompasses all the
physical abilities required to be a successful
athlete (Figure 1- Foran, 2001). Agility allows
the athlete to react to a stimulus by starting
quickly and efficiently in a desired direction
and be prepared to change direction or stop
rapidly to make a play. There are two critical
elements in developing agility coordination and
skill. Coordination allows the body to execute a
movement in response to a stimulus and skill
allows the coordinated abilities into an
efficient and effective movement (Foran, 2001).
Agility
Figure 1
21
Agility Drills The Dawg

Start
Finish
Equipment Alterations -five cones -change
direction -two 12 inch hurdles or half moon
bags -increase hurdle height Dimensions -5 x 7
(yards) -cone 2 is 2 yards off line -hurdles 2
yards apart Direction 1-Starting facing the
start line, step left and sprint around cone 2.
2-From cone two, decelerate around Cone 3
accelerate and sprint over hurdles. 3-Drive
around cone 4, sprint back over hurdles,
decelerate around cone 3. 4-Drive off outside
foot accelerate to cone 5 decelerate around cone
5, 5- Sprint through cone 4.
22
Agility Drills N-Drill
Finish


Cone 4
Cone 2


Start
Cone 1
Cone 3
Equipment -four cones Dimensions -10 x 10
(yards) Direction 1-Starting facing the start
line, sprint up to cone 2 2- Decelerate around
cone 2, sprint to cone 3 3- Decelerate around
cone 3, sprint through cone 4 Alterations -rever
se direction of drill -add hurdles in middle to
increase leg drive and stride length
23
Agility Drills Pro-Agility/5-10-5
Cone 2
Cone 2
Cone 2



Start/Finish
10 yards
Equipment -3-6 cones Dimensions -10
(yards) Direction 1- Start straddling line 2
(middle line) marked with cone two facing
coach 2- On the command, sprint five yards
decelerate and touch line 1with right hand 3-
Sprint 10 yards, decelerate and touch line 3 with
left hand 4- Sprint back through line 2 (starting
line) Alterations -reverse direction of
drill -work using sprint to back pedal and vice
versa
24
Agility Drills Star Drill



Cone 4
Cone 6
Cone 5



Center Cone
Cone 7
Cone 3



Start
Cone 2
Cone 8
Cone 1
Equipment -9 cones Dimensions -6 x 6 or 10 x
10 (yards) Direction 1- Start on the right hand
side of cone 1. On the command the athlete
sprints to the center cone, decelerates and
sprints our of box at cone 2. 2- repeat except
sprint out at cone 3. 3- repeat except exit out
of box at cone 4. 4- continue until athlete exits
all the way around box at starting
cone Alterations -reverse order of cones give
cone direction when athlete gets to middle
cone -change mode of entrance exit (i.e. back
pedal, shuffle, etc.)
25
Agility Drills L-Drill
5 yards


Cone 2
Cone 3
10 yards

Cone 1
Start/Finish
Equipment -3 cones Dimensions -10 x 5
(yards) Direction 1- Start on the left hand
side of cone 1. On the command the athlete
sprints to the cone 2, decelerates and sprints
right to the inside of cone 3. 2- At cone 3, the
athlete needs to decelerate around and sprint
back to cone 2 3- At cone 2, the athlete needs to
decelerate and sprint back through cone
one. Alterations -reverse direction of turn
after cone 2 -implement varied movement style
(i.e. back pedal, shuffle, etc.)
26
Agility Drills T-Drill



Cone 3
Cone 4
Cone 2
Cone 1

Start
Finish
Equipment -4 cones Dimensions -10 x 10
(yards) Direction 1- Start on the left hand
side of cone 1. On the command the athlete
sprints to the cone 2, decelerates and sprints
right to the inside of cone 3. 2- At cone 3, the
athlete needs to decelerate around and sprint
inside cone 4. 3- At cone 4, the athlete
decelerates, and sprints back to cone 2. 4- At
cone 2, the athlete decelerates over the top of
cone 2, and back to the right of cone
1. Alterations -reverse start/finish
direction -implement varied movement style (i.e.
back pedal, shuffle, etc.)
27
Agility Drills Box Drill/Four Corner Drill
C


NOTES -Vary Movement Around box -Be sure to
lead with Both sides of body
B
S



C
Equipment -4 cones Dimensions -10 x 10
(yards)/shorten to meet demands of
sport Direction 1- Start on the left hand side
of cone 1. On the command the athlete sprints to
the cone 2, decelerates and sprints right to the
inside of cone 3. 2- At cone 3, the athlete needs
to decelerate around and sprint inside cone 4.
3- At cone 4, the athlete decelerates, and
sprints back to cone 2. 4- At cone 2, the athlete
decelerates over the top of cone 2, and back to
the right of cone 1. Alterations -reverse
start/finish direction -implement varied movement
style(i.e. back pedal, shuffle, etc.)
28
Agility Drills W-Drill



5 yards
Finish
Start


10 yards
Equipment -5 cones Dimensions -10 x 5 (yards)
widen/shorten to meet demands of
sport Direction 1- Start with shoulders square
to start line. On command, sprint up to cone 2
and decelerate around cone 2. 2- Work around cone
with foot fire, back pedal to cone 3, decelerate
with foot fire around cone 3. 3- Sprint on top of
cone 4 and decelerate around cone with foot fire.
4- Back pedal through cone 5. Alterations -rev
erse start/finish direction -implement varied
movement style(i.e. back pedal, shuffle, carioca,
etc.)
29
Agility Drills Cone Chute




Start
Finish



Equipment -7 cones Dimensions -cones 3-5
yards apart Direction 1- Start in a two point
stance facing the first cone, sprint around each
cone 2- remain with hips pointing toward cones 3-
move cones closer after each set Alterations -re
verse start/finish direction -implement varied
movement style (i.e. back pedal, shuffle,
carioca, etc.)
30
Agility Drills Nebraska Drill

5 yards


1- 2 yards
Equipment -3 cones Dimensions -5 yards by 1-2
yards Direction 1- Start in a two or three
point stance on the first line 2- Sprint to the
first cone and decelerate and make a right-hand
turn 3- Sprint to the starting line, decelerate
and make a left-hand turn. 4- Sprint to the
second line and touch it with your hand, then
back pedal across the starting line Alterations
-reverse start/finish direction -implement varied
movement style (i.e. back pedal, shuffle,
carioca, etc.)
31
Agility Drills Bag/Hurdle Drills
Stride Through- Run over bags. Focus on proper
arm action, Knees up, quick feet, eyes up, and
fast forward movement.
L
R
L
R
L
R
Lateral Shuffle- Shuffle over bags. Focus on lead
step over The bags. Do not cross over! Keep
shoulders square, knees Bent, back tight, and
head (eyes) up.
L,R
L,R
L,R
L,R
L,R
L,R
Lateral Shuffle with Buzz- Same as regular
shuffle except You pop your feet between bags.
L
R,L R,L
R,L R,L
R,L R,L
R,L R,L
R
32
Agility Drills Bag/Hurdle Drills
Weave Through Standing- Lateral shuffle the
length of the Front bag. Step forward and
lateral shuffle back up the Length of the second
bag. Step forward and repeat for the Remainder
of the bags.
S
S
S
SH
SH
SH
SH
S
SH
SH
S
S
Combo Forward-Lateral- Lateral over first two
bags. Sprint over the top of third bag, flip hips
and sprint in front of bag four. Shuffle over
last two bags.
S
eyes
S
S
SH
SH
eyes
33
Agility Drills Ladder Drills
  • One Foot
  • Sprint through forward placing one foot in each
    hole.

b. Two Foot Running forward, make sure both feet
land in each hole.
c. One foot lateral shuffle Start with one foot
in the hole and one foot out.
d. Two feet lateral shuffle Shuffle in a lateral
motion make sure both feet land in each hole.
e. Crossover Forward Start on the right side of
the box. Step inside first hole with right foot
and outside next hole with left foot.
L
L
L
L
L
34
Agility Drills Ladder Drills
f. Icky Shuffle- Sprint through forward placing
one foot in each hole.
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
g. Lateral In and Out- Standing on the side with
both feet out. Start with Rt. Foot in the box
followed By the left. Follow the sequence while
moving in a lateral motion.
LR
LR
LR
LR
LR
LR
LR
LR
LR
LR
h. Front Lateral Crossover Start with Lt. foot
in the box while standing on the side of the
ladder. In a lateral Motion crossover ladder
with your Rt. Foot and repeat sequence.
i. Hopscotch Start with Lt. foot in the box
while standing on the side of the ladder. In a
lateral Motion crossover ladder with your Rt.
Foot and repeat sequence.
L
L
L
L
L
R
R
R
R
R
35
Agility Drills Ladder Hopping/Bounding Drills
j. Bunny Hops/Two feet in each hole
(Speed/Height)
k. One feet in each hole (Speed/Height)
l. Hop in/Hop out (Speed/Height)
LR
LR
LR
LR
LR
m. Ricochet (Speed/Height) Flip hips ¼ or 1/2
turn with each hop from box to box.
LR
LR
LR
LR
LR
LR
36
Agility Drills Jump Rope Program
The jump rope routine is meant to be fun but also
competitive. Jumping rope is an excellent way to
develop speed, quickness, coordination, and
concentration. The jump rope routine is based on
a cross layout format-forming four quadrants. The
quadrants are numbered as follows
1
2
4
3
  • The progression of routine should be followed
    below, in the order of 1-10
  • Regular Jump x 30
  • Side to Side (4 to 3 back) x 25 (both feet)
  • Up and Back (4 to 1 back) x 25 (both feet)
  • Boxer Shuffle (2 on Rt. Foot, 2 on left) x 30
  • Up and Back one foot (4 to 1 back) x 15 (Rt.
    Foot), x 15 (Left Foot)
  • Side to side one foot (4 to 3) x 15 (Rt. Foot),
    x 15 (Left Foot)
  • Triangle (1-2-4) Alternate Switch (2-1-3) x 20
  • Four Square (1-3-2-4) x 20 (both feet)
  • Variation (1-2-3-4)
  • Double Jump with bounce Rope Under feet x 20
    (both feet)
  • Double Jump in succession Rope Under feet x 20
    (both feet)
  • Bonus Jump- Regular Jumps as many as possible
    in 30 seconds. 100 reps is the number to beat.
  • Advanced Jumpers can increase number of reps
    per exercise and should shoot for
  • 110 reps on bonus jumps.

37
Agility Drills Jump Rope Program
Double Bunny Hop 1- Stand with both feet to one
side of a line 2- Jump back and forth over the
line as you move forward jumping the rope 3-
Cover a distance of 10-15 yards
Single Bunny Hop 1- Stand with one foot to one
side of the line 2- Jump back and forth over the
line with one foot as you move forward jumping
the rope 3- Cover a distance of 10-15 yards 4-
Come back in opposite direction with other foot
Front to Back Double Bunny Hop (Single Foot as
well) 1- Stand with both feet to one side of a
line 2- Jump back and forth over the line at a 45
degree angle as you move lateral jumping the
rope 3- Cover a distance of 10-15 yards come
back in opposite direction
38
Agility Drills Jump Rope Program
Ali Shuffle 1- Stand with both feet splitting the
line 2- Complete the drill doing the Ali shuffle
as you move laterally down the line (one foot
goes forward of the line and the other stays
behind the line. Switch feet as you jump in the
air to the front and back of the line.) 3- Cover
a distance of 10-15 yards
Ricochet 1- Stand facing the line with both feet
to one side of the line 2- Jump with both feet a
half turn to the left as you move across the
line 3- Next, jump with both feet a half turn to
the right as you move forward 4- Repeat the half
turns going from a 6 oclock position to a 12
oclock position.
39
Agility Drills Dot Drills
Dot Drills Dot drills are designed to increase
foot speed, coordination, proprioception,
reaction time, and balance. Dot drills can be
utilized in individual training as well as a
group setting. Keys in executing dot drills
appropriately include accuracy, speed, and rhythm
(pace of exercise). As with any performing any
exercise, close attention to detail and technique
are more important than volume of exercise. The
drills can be performed with one series of dots
or by sequencing a number of dot series.
Exercises can be performed as a single exercise
or in a series. Volume and duration of exercise
will be dependent on desired outcome of exercise
and location within program or cycle. Example
Set 3 x 5 of following in a series Hopscotch,
hopscotch w/turn, skier hop, perimeter.
Dot Drill Layout
Series of Dot Drills
24
  • 4 dot drills placed together
  • can use more if desired

12-18
  • Drills to use
  • Both Feet Single FOOT
  • Up and back (Hopscotch) -Figure 8 (rt/left)
  • Up and back (Hopscotch) w/a 180 turn -Perimeter
    (rt/left)
  • Two foot perimeter -SL Skier Hops
  • Skier Hops
  • Figure 8

Variation give each dot a number and have
athletes stand on center dot and jump to called
number and back to starting dot
40
MP Strength and Conditioning
Conditioning Commitment Until one is committed
there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back,
always ineffectiveness. W.H. Murray
41
Conditioning
Energy Systems Training Each sport offers a
myriad of physiological demands and requirements.
In order to train athletes geared to meet sport
demands, the program philosophy must be line with
researched data and proven methods. The ability
to understand and apply knowledge of energy
systems to training sessions will benefit and
prepare athletes for competition. This
application should not only take place during
conditioning but as well in the weight room.
Energy is the capacity to perform work, more
importantly for the body to perform a task
efficiently and effectively. Work is the
capacity to apply force (through muscle
contractions) to resistance. Energy is required
to perform physical work during training and
competition. The body creates energy through
muscle cell conversion of foodstuff into a
high-energy compound called adenosine
triphosphate (ATP). ATP is the energy used in the
body to create muscle contractions or perform
aerobic exercise. ATP is converted into ADP P
and energy is released and movement ensues. The
body can replenish ATP by using one of three
energy systems, depending on the type of
training the anaerobic alactic (ATP-CP), the
anaerobic lactic system, or aerobic system.
(Bompa, 2005).
42
Conditioning Hard Way
40 yards
X
X
30 yards
X
X
40 or 30 The Hard Way Description This drill
requires three to five athletes. Place two cones
40 or 30 yards apart. One or two athletes will
start at one cone while the other two or three
start at the opposite cone. Designate a running
order one and up. The athletes will start in a
sport specific stance. Athlete number one will
sprint the distance (40 or 30 yards) as fast as
possible, when he/she crosses the line, athlete
2 will sprint the same distance as fast as
possible. Continue drill until each athlete
sprints a total of ten sprints each.
Notes If more than one drill is performed, rest
3-5 minutes between Drills. (Glass, 2000)
43
Conditioning Shuttle Runs
40 yard shuttle Starting on the end line,
athletes sprint and touch the first line at 5
yards and sprint back to the starting line. The
athletes turn and sprint to the second line at 10
yards and sprint back to the starting line. The
athletes touch the starting line and sprint back
to the first line and turn to sprint back through
the starting line.
X
X
5 yds.
10 yds.
60 yard shuttle Starting on the end line,
athletes sprint and touch the first line at 5
yards and sprint back to the starting line. The
athletes then turn and sprint to the second line
at 10yards and return through the starting line.
Turn and sprint to the third line at 15 yards
and turn and run through starting line.
10 yds.
5 yds.
15 yds.
X
X
300 yard shuttle Starting on the end line,
athletes sprint and touch the end line at 25
yards and returns to starting line (1 round
trip). In order to complete the shuttle, the
athletes need to make 6 continuous round trips
25 yds.
X
X
44
Conditioning Interval Running
Level One 1 x 400 2 minute rest 3 x 200 13
work/rest ratio 3 minute rest 6 x 100 13
work/rest ratio 3 minute rest 8 x 80 13
work/rest ratio 3 minute rest 6 x 60 13
work/rest ratio
Level Two 1 x 200 2 minute rest 8 x 100 13
work/rest ratio 3 minute rest 6 x 60 13
work/rest ratio 3 minute rest 6 x 40 13
work/rest ratio 2 minute rest 6 x 20 13
work/rest ratio 90 seconds rest 6 x 10 no rest
between
Level Three 8 x 100 13 work/rest ratio 2 minute
rest 6 x 60 13 work/rest ratio 2 minute rest 6
x 40 13 work/rest ratio 90 seconds rest 8 x 20
13 work/rest ratio 60 seconds rest 10 x 10 no
rest between
Level Four 4 x 80 work/rest ratio 2 minute rest 4
x 60 13 work/rest ratio 90 seconds rest 8 x 40
13 work/rest ratio 90 seconds rest 10 x 20
13 work/rest ratio 60 seconds rest 14 x 10 no
rest between
Glass, 2000
45
Conditioning 2 Quarters of Sprints
46
Conditioning Sport-Specific Drills
Slide and Sprint Description Starting in a two
point stance, slide 10 to 15 yards, turn and
sprint to finish line (Glass, 2000) Back Pedal
and Sprint Description Starting in a two-point
stance, back pedal 10 to 15 yards, turn and
sprint to finish line. (Glass, 2000) Tennis Ball
Drops Description Starting in a two-point
stance, sprint and catch tennis ball before
second bounce. Start at 3 yards and then move up
until you can no longer catch the ball. (Glass,
2000) Short Sprints Description Starting in
two-point stance, sprint to the finish line. Use
variety of starting positions. Examples side
starts, backward starts, seated starts, kneeling
starts (rt./left/both knees), push up starts
(work leg drive), and lying on back starts.
Volleyball 360 Drill Description Starting in
defensive position on the service line, Sprint
continuously to the 10 foot (3 M) line and back,
center line And back, opposite 10 foot (3 M) line
and back, and opposite service line and back.
Repeat starting with opposite service line,
Working your way back down. (Glass, 2000) Court
Half Gasser Description Starting in a two-point
stance on the side line of a basketball Court,
sprint across the width of the court and touch
the line with your hand Or foot. Make three
consecutive trips. (V-ball or tennis 4 continuous
trips) (Glass, 2000)
47
Conditioning Sport-Specific Drills
Mountains Description Starting in a two point
stance, sprint to first line, return to
starting Line. Sprint to second line, return to
first line, sprint to third line, return to
second line, sprint to fourth line, return to
third line, sprint to fifth line, return to
fourth line, turn and sprint through fifth line.
(Vary line distance and number of lines).
Continuous run key turns and changes of
pace. Half Gasser Description Starting
in a two-point stance on the side line of a
football field. Sprint across the width of the
field and back. Touch line with hand. (Work/Rest
Ratio 12) (Glass, 2000) Full Gasser Description
Starting in a two-point stance on the side line
of a football field. Sprint across the width of
the field and back 2 continuous round trips.
Touch line with hand. (Work/Rest Ratio 12)
(Glass, 2000) Anaerobic Endurance and
Endurance 1.5 mile run, 1 mile run, 660, 440, 220
yard intervals Description Run designated laps
around track. Work/Rest 11 (rest amount of time
it took to complete the run. (Glass, 2000)
48
Conditioning Sport-Specific Drills
Speed Distance Drill Description Line 4-6
athletes in a two-point stance at the starting
line. Partners stand approximately 45 m (49.21
yards) away holding a cone. On the command
athletes sprint for 7 seconds. A whistle will
tell runners when 7 seconds are up. Partners
place a cone at the spot passed at the time
whistle was blown. Runners then walk back to the
starting line and rest a total of 90 seconds.
When there is about a 10 reduction in the
distance traveled or about 3 strides, the drill
is over. Most athletes will get about 6-8 reps
before there is a reduction in yards covered.
(Nikta, 2008)
Sprint Ladders Description Decide on the
highest level sprint based upon the demands of
the sport and volume of work for the cycle/week.
See the following example 40 yard sprint ladder
(allow 13 work/rest ratio) 2 x 10, 2 x 20, 2 x
30, 2 x 40 (at the top) 2 x 40, 2 x 30, 2 x 20, 2
x 10 (coming back down)
49
Conditioning Simulated Training Drills
  • Simulated Drills
  • A running program that is designed to condition
    you in
  • an actual game type situation. Keep this in mind
    as you
  • coach your athletes to run desired patterns. Try
    to keep
  • their intensity and footwork as specific to their
    position as
  • possible. Between reps as athletes jog back to
    starting
  • position, go ahead and call out the next pattern.
    All
  • patterns should be completed continuously until
    the set is
  • finished. For football athletes we will simulate
    the drill as
  • being in a two-minute drill, no timeouts, and a
    10 plays to
  • win the game.
  • Skill Athletes all patterns need to be worked
    from both
  • left and right sides of formations.

50
Conditioning Simulated Football Training
Drills Wide Receiver in Football
25 yds.
20 yds.
15 yds.
10 yds.
5 yds.
51
Conditioning Simulated Football Training
Drills Point Guard in Basketball
25 yds.
20 yds.
15 yds.
10 yds.
5 yds.
52
MP Strength and Conditioning
Plyometrics Desire, Dedication, Determination
53
Plyometrics Explosive Speed Strength
  • The National Strength and Conditioning
    Association Refers to Plyometrics as the
    exercises that enable a Muscle to reach maximal
    strength in as short as time as possible
    (Baechle, 1994). Plyometrics are believed to be
    The link relating speed and power. In using
    resistance Exercises the size of the muscle is
    emphasized, in Plyometrics the explosive-reactive
    power is utilized by improving the stretch
    reflex of the muscle.
  • The stretch or myotatic reflex of the muscle is
    its ability
  • to contract (concentrically) following a period
    of lengthen state (eccentric). Essentially,
    plyometrics attempt to improve the rapid
    deceleration of mass followed by a rapid
    acceleration of mass. The faster a muscle can
    change direction the greater power/force
    production created.
  • Plyometric Principles (Glass, 2000)
  • 1- Weight training is a complement to
    plyometrics. In order to perform
  • Plyometric exercises, an athlete must be able to
    lift 1.5 times his/her body weight (Baechle,
    1994).
  • 2- Frequency- number of plyometric workouts in a
    week. Usual range is one to three sessions with
    two being the norm.
  • 3- Volume- expressed as a number of foot contacts
    per workout. Foot contacts per session 80-100
    for beginners 100-120 for intermediate level
    120-140 for advanced athletes (Baechle, 1994).
  • -If intensity of training is high, volume should
    be low
  • 4- Surface is key, must be performed soft-grass
    like surface.
  • 5- Emphasize quality of quantity emphasize
    height and/or distance with little ground contact
    time.
  • 6- Progression- Two leg single response leaps,
    jumps, skips, hops,
  • bounds with two legs. Then proceed to single leg
    exercises. Only when
  • advanced skills are acquired should height be
    incorporated.

54
Plyometrics
Ankle Bounce Standing with a slight bend in the
knees, the feet together, and the hands on the
Waist, jump as high as possible generating
vertical force through plantar flexion Of the
ankles. Upon landing on the balls of the feet,
quickly repeat the movement for a designated
number of reps. Cycle Ankle Bounce Standing
with a slight bend in the knees, the feet
together, and hands on the waist, jump as high as
possible generating vertical force through
planter flexion of the ankles. Upon landing on
the balls of the feet, quickly repeat the
movement for a designated number of reps. Cycle
your legs through, alternating one leg out in
front of the other each jump. Drop
Jumps Standing with the arms on the side of the
body, drop to the ¼ squat position and Perform an
explosive vertical jump. Throw arms upward with
each jump. Set Up again and repeat the
jump. Tuck Jumps Perform successive vertical
jumps. With each jump, pull the knees
upward Toward the chest prior to landing. Repeat
the movement emphasizing the impulse off the
ground (spend little time as possible with
ground/foot contact). The hands should be palms
down at chest height attempt to touch the hands
with the knees. Squat Jumps Standing with the
hands clasped behind the head, lower down to a
parallel squat Position and jump vertically.
Upon landing return to the parallel squat
position And immediately repeat the
jump. Standing Long Jump From the standing jump
position, perform a standing long jump
emphasizing Distance. Throw the arms upward and
extend the body for maximum distance.
55
Plyometrics
DBL Leg Cone Jump Using six 12 cones spaced 1
yard apart jump upward as high as possible,
flexing the knees completely so as to bring the
feet under the buttocks, and forward enough to
clear the cone. Emphasize maximum lift by
bringing the knees high and forward with each
repetition. Upon landing, impulse off the ground
for another repetition. Use the arms to help
achieve maximum lift. SR Leaps From the
standing power position perform a standing long
jump emphasizing height and distance. Throw the
arms upward and extend the body for
maximum height and distance. 3 Continuous
SLJ From the standing long jump position perform
a standing long jump emphasizing Distance. Throw
the arms upward and extend the body for maximum
distance. Upon Landing, impulse off the ground
for 2 more repetitions. Single Leg Hops Standing
on one leg with the arms on the side of the body,
drop to the ¼ squat position and perform an
explosive vertical jump. Repeat the movement
emphasizing the impulse off the ground. Spend
as little time as possible on the
ground. Lateral Cone Jumps Standing beside a
cone, jump laterally over the cone flexing the
knees completely So as to bring the feet under
the buttocks. Pull the knee high to emphasize
Maximum lift. Upon landing impulse off the
ground over the cone in a back and Forth
sequence. Thrust the arms in an upward
motion. Depth Drops While standing at the edge
of a plyo. box (18 24), drop to the ground
landing with Both feet together and knees bent to
absorb the shock of the landing. The back Should
be flat at a 45 degree angle to the hip.
Maintain a good power position, then Return to
the top of the box for another drop.
56
Plyometrics
Box Jumps Standing in front of a plyo. Box (start
low to high), jump vertical and forward onto The
box. Execute proper landing with soft, flat feet
and absorb the landing through Proper knee
flexion. Emphasize body control and speed of
movement. Incremented Lateral Hops Using a
marked area shaped like a V, start at the head
of the V jump side to side Outside the marked
area for (8) jumps. Upon landing impulse off the
ground in a Back and forth sequence. Work your
way up so that you finish at the widest part Of
the V which should be 4 to 6, with a length
of 8 to 12. Side to Side Box Shuffle Standing
beside a 12 box, place one foot on the box and
jump laterally over the Box. Push off the foot
that is in contact with the box. One foot should
be on the Box at all times. Upon landing impulse
off the ground over the box in a back and Forth
sequence. Thrust the arms in an upward
motion. Spin Jumps Standing with both feet side
by side, jump just high enough off the ground so
that Your body can spin around. Jump ¼ and back,
½ and back, ¾ and back, and 360 and back. Upon
landing impulse off the ground in a back and
forth sequence. Work both sides of the
body. Split Jumps Standing with your legs split
like a lunge position, jump vertically. Upon
landing Immediately repeat the jump. Thrust the
arms in an upward motion. Cycle Split
Jumps Standing with your legs split like a lunge
position, jump vertically. Upon
landing Immediately repeat the jump. Cycle your
legs through, alternating one leg out In front of
the other jump Complex Training A type of
training in which a set of plyometrics is
performed after a set of resistance Training
exercise.
57
MP Strength and Conditioning
Flexibility "It's not the will to win that
matters - everyone has that. It's the will to
prepare to win that matters." Paul Bear Bryant
58
Flexibility
  • Flexibility is defined as the range of motion
    about a joint or a combination of joints (Glass,
    2000) and the range of movement in a joint and
    its surrounding muscles (Baechle, 1994). Unlike
    strength, speed, and other motor abilities,
    flexibility belongs not as a portion of movement
    but rather governs motion of the body (Foran,
    2001). Without proper flexibility, an athletes
    movement would not be very economical. Not only
    does the motor system require proper movement
    about a joint but proper flexibility is needed to
    control coordination and aid in technique
    development and skill acquisition.
  • In learning to train the complete athlete, it
    must be understood that flexibility training must
    be considered a workout and not just a beginning
    and finishing routine. Training and conditioning
    expose the body to tremendous volume and
    intensity of exercise (Foran, 2001). This
    regular stress placed on the body can result in
    wear and tear of the body and possibly even
    injury. To prevent this injury, athlete must
    maintain integrity of the musculoskeletal system.
    Proper flexibility produces a balance between
    the wear and tear and the restoring of muscle and
    maintaining key physiological processes (Foran,
    2001).
  • Types of Stretching (Baechle, 1994 Glass, 2000)
  • Active Stretching occurs when the person
    stretching supplies the force of the stretch.
  • May include Static- is a constant stretch
    that is held at end position for 10-30 secs.
  • Dynamic- involves flexibility during
    sport-specific movements
  • Ballistic- involves a bouncing movement which
    the end position is not held.
    (not recommended)
  • Passive Stretching occurs when a partner or
    device provides the force for the stretch.
  • May include Static
  • Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF)
  • -combines alternating contraction and
    relaxation of both agonist and
  • antagonist muscles thus a contraction is
    caused due to neural responses (Baechle, 1994)
  • Types of PNF
  • Hold-Relax
  • Contraction-relax
  • Slow-reversal-hold-relax

59
MP Strength and Conditioning
Nutrition Individual commitment to a group effort
- that is what makes a team work, a company work,
a society work, a civilization work. Vince
Lombardi
60
Nutrition Basic Nutrition Overview
  • All aspects of sports conditioning are important
    for maximum physical development. Nutrition is
  • one component that is often overlooked. The
    following section will include information on how
    to
  • improve daily dietary habits and increase
    knowledge on nutritional information.
  • Nutritional Needs of an Athlete
  • Athletes require
  • -Increased Protein Intake
  • -Increased Carbohydrate Intake
  • -Increased Fluid Intake
  • -Increased Vitamin and Mineral Intake
  • Benefits for Proper Nutrition
  • -Recovery time is decreased
  • -Increased in energy
  • -Maintenance of muscle mass during in-season
    phase
  • -Increase in Stamina
  • -Increase in Lean Body Mass
  • -Improvement in Performance

61
Nutrition Carbohydrates
  • Carbohydrates
  • Approximately 55-60 of daily caloric intake
    should consist of carbohydrates
  • Primary source of glucose in the muscle and liver
  • Glucose is the main fuel used by the brain and
    central nervous system
  • Body stores glucose as glycogen
  • Glycogen mainly stored in liver and muscles
  • Types of Carbohydrates
  • Simple Sugars
  • TYPES Glucose, fructose, sucrose, lactose,
    maltose, maltodextrins, corn syrup, and high
    fructose corn syrup.
  • Absorbed quickly
  • Causes spikes in blood sugar
  • Leads to increase in appetite
  • Prevents metabolism of fatty acids
  • Suppresses release of Growth Hormone
  • Examples
  • Table sugar, milk sugar, sodas, honey, etc.
  • Complex Carbohydrates
  • Types Starches and dietary fiber

62
Nutrition Proteins
  • Proteins
  • Building blocks for muscle development
  • Essential for muscle maintenance, growth, and
    recovery
  • Muscles breakdown and micro-tears are created due
    to stress of training
  • Made up of amino acids
  • Two types of amino acids
  • Essential- body does not produce, must obtain
    from food
  • Non-essential- body can produce
  • Sources of quality protein
  • Lean ground beef, turkey, chicken
  • Legumes beans and peas
  • Skinless, grilled/baked/roasted chicken or turkey
    breast
  • Seafood (steamed/broiled/baked/grilled)
  • Low-fat cottage cheese
  • Skim milk
  • Cheese (2 or skim)
  • White tuna in water
  • Nuts or seeds
  • Egg whites or egg beaters

63
Nutrition Dietary Fats
  • Dietary Fats
  • Required for growth, recovery, and overall health
  • Should compose of no more than 25-30 of daily
    caloric intake
  • Primary source of energy during low-level
    intensity/longer duration aerobic activities
  • Running
  • Swimming
  • Necessary for the regulation of certain body
    processes
  • Minimize intake of saturated fatty acids and
    cholesterol
  • Considered to be bad but some fats are
    important to overall diet
  • Along with providing energy to the body, fat
    helps protect organs, keep bodies warm, carry
    and store fat soluble vitamins and serve as
    building blocks for the formation of hormones.
  • Two Types Dietary Fats
  • Saturated fats-
  • Solid at room temperature
  • Found in meats and other animal by products
  • Inhibit the bodys ability to rid of bad
    cholesterol (LDL), which leads to clogged
    arteries and other health risks
  • Should be limited to less than 10 of daily
    caloric intake
  • Ways to lower saturated fat include lower fat
    dairy products, cut out or use low-fat butter
    product, trim meats of extra fat
  • Unsaturated fats-
  • Liquid at room temperature
  • Include vegetable oils, salad dressings, smart
    balance butter substitute
  • Fats in nuts

64
Nutrition Fluid Intake
  • Fluid Intake
  • One of the most common mistakes athletes make is
    going into practice, and
  • training sessions when they are dehydrated.
    Dehydration decreases blood
  • volume, increases body temperature, and leads to
    impaired performance.
  • Performance starts to decline when as little as 1
    to 2 percent of the bodys
  • water is lost. When fluid losses are extreme,
    heat exhaustion, heat stroke,
  • and even death can result. Unfortunately, by the
    time you feel thirsty, you may
  • already be low on fluids. Dark colored urine may
    also indicate dehydration.
  • Do not wait until you feel thirsty before
    increasing your fluids. Voluntary
  • replacement of fluids is not adequate and only
    replaces about one-half of
  • what is lost in sweat. (Spano, Monkhouse, Lewis,
    and Massoni, 2000)
  • Guidelines for Fluid Intake
  • Drink 2 cups of fluid 2 hours before practice or
    competition
  • Drink 1 ½ cups of fluid 15 minutes prior to event
  • Drink cool fluids (45-50 degrees)
  • Drink often during training and competition
    (every 15-20 minutes)

65
MP Strength and Conditioning
Exercise Technique Don't measure yourself by
what you have accomplished, but by what you
should have accomplished with your ability.
John Wooden
66
Exercise Technique
Olympic Lifts Hang Cleans With feet shoulder
width and hands slightly outside the feet set the
back by sticking out the chest and buttocks.
Stand up and take a step back away from blocks
(if coming from floor, then omit this step back).
Position feet shoulder width apart and slowly
the bar to 1-2 inches above the knee by bending
the knees and hips. Set the back, curl wrists
towards the body, and place shoulder over the
bar. Powerfully and explosively extend the hips
by pushing against the floor (driving feet
through the floor), shrug the shoulders, and pull
the bar up to chest level. At this point, elbows
should be up and out to the side. Drop under the
bar by re-bending knees and hips, shoot the elbow
up and under the bar, catch the bar across the
front of the shoulder and allow it to roll back
into fingertips. Lower the bar back to starting
position and repeat desired number of times.
Power Pulls (clean/snatch grip) Approach the
bar with feet parallel shoulder width apart. The
lifter should be able to see the bar across the
first shoelace in shoes. Grip the bar slightly
outside the legs, curl wrists towards body, set
the back, shoulders over the bar, and focus eyes
straight ahead. Keeping the arms straight, start
the movement by powerfully extending the hips and
knees. Transfer weight to the toes and shrug the
shoulders. During the lift, arms should remain
straight by not bending at the elbows. Through
lift remember to keep the bar close to the body
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