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Implementing Professional Development Schools

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Title: Implementing Professional Development Schools


1
Implementing Professional Development Schools
Presented by Dr. Gwen Benson - Georgia State
University Dr. Bill Curlette - Georgia State
University Dr. Dee Taylor Georgia State
University Dr. Susan Ogletree - Georgia State
University Dr. Joyce Many Georgia State
University Ms. August Dale Georgia State
University Dr. Colin Martin Gwinnett County
Schools Mr. Andrew Foster Meadowcreek High
School Dr. Jaci Webb-Dempsey West Virginia
University Dr. Jane Neapolitan Towson
University
Presented at the American Educational Research
Association New York City, New York March 27,
2008
2
Introduction and OverviewDr. Gwen Benson
3
Introduction
  • Part I Georgia State University and P-12 PDS
    Partners
  • Dr. Gwen Benson Associate Dean, Georgia State
    University
  • Dr. Bill Curlette - Professor, Educational Policy
    Studies and Director for Research and Evaluation
    for PDS2 Grant
  • Dr. Dee Taylor - PDS2 Project Director and former
    Executive Director for District wide Professional
    Development
  • Dr. Susan Ogletree Educational Research Bureau
    Director
  • Dr. Colin Martin Executive Director of Research
    Evaluation, Gwinnett County Public Schools
  • Mr. Andrew Foster -Assistant Principal,
    Meadowcreek High School, Gwinnett County Public
    Schools

4
Introduction Contd
  • Part II Approaches to Documenting the Impact of
    PDS
  • Dr. Jaci Webb-Dempsey- Assistant Professor in
    Technology, Learning Culture in the College of
    Human Resources Education, West Virginia
    University
  • Part III NCATE PDS Standards The Driving Force
    for State-wide PDS Implementation
  • Dr. Jane Neapolitan Associate Professor in the
    Department of Instructional Leadership and
    Professional Development at Towson University,
    Director of Graduate Programs in Organizational
    Change

5
Introduction Contd
  • Part IV How to Operationalize the NCATE/PDS
    Standards Moving Forward to a Shared Definition
    of PDS
  • Dr. Joyce Many Chair of Middle/Secondary
    Education and Instructional Technology, Georgia
    State University
  • Part V Break Out Sessions

6
Transitioning into Professional Development
Schools An Urban University and Urban School
Systems ModelPDS2 Professional Development
School Partnerships Deliver Success
GRANT 6.1 million/ 5 years/ US Dept. of
Education RECIPIENTS GSUs College of Arts and
Sciences and College of Education GOAL To
partner with our urban school systems Atlanta
City Schools, and Fulton, Gwinnett, and DeKalb
Counties to Create Professional Development
Schools (PDS).
7
GSU/P-12 Journey
8
Expected Outcomes
  • Increased production and retention of new
    teachers (especially underrepresented groups)
  • Increased student achievement
  • Professional renewal for all PDS participants

9
Transitioning into Professional Development
Schools An Urban University and Urban School
Systems ModelPDS2 Professional Development
School Partnerships Deliver Success
PDS Model Sample
10
PDS Organization Chart
11
GSU/NCTAF Induction Project
An Induction Model Based on the Georgia
Framework for Teaching
CCLCs New Teachers Student Teachers Mentors Expe
rienced Teachers University Faculty
Evidence from Student Work
Professional Growth Continuum Self-Assessment Ob
servation Goal-Setting Professional Growth
New Teachers Growth Plans
Support Mechanisms The Bridge CCLC
Coaches Protocols for Interaction In-service
Training Mentors
12
GSU/NCTAF Induction Project
  • Cross Career Learning Communities (CCLCs)
  • Critical Friends Group protocols
  • The BRIDGE (Building Resources Induction and
    Development for Georgia Educators)
  • Professional Growth Plan (PGP)

13
Cross Career Learning Communities (CCLCs)
  • Teachers will form and facilitate Cross Career
    Learning Communities (CCLCs) in each school made
    up of a combination of
  • Newly-hired GSU teachers
  • GSU teacher candidates
  • GSU faculty members
  • School site coordinators
  • School administrators
  • Mentor teachers
  • Interested teachers

14
PDS2 OverviewDr. Bill Curlette
15
NCATE PDS Definition (A Springboard for PDS
Discussions)
  • Professional Development Schools (PDSs).
  • A K-12 school, or schools, in partnership with a
    professional education unit with a mission to
    prepare new teachers and other educators, support
    professional development, support inquiry
    directed at the improvement of professional
    practice, and improve student learning (NCATE
    Standards for Professional Development Schools,
    2001)

16
Logic Model for PDS2 GRANT
Note Arrows Represent Major Relationships
17
Context Demographics of Participating School
Systems 2006-2007
School District Total Enrollment Students on Free/ Reduced Lunch African American Latino White Asian
Atlanta Public Schools 49,773 75 85 4 8 1
DeKalb Co. Schools 98,713 64 76 8 10 3
Fulton Co. Schools 81,982 36 48 10 38 8
Gwinnett Co. Schools 151,421 40 26 21 39 10
Governors Office of Student Achievement
(2006-2007). State of Georgia Annual Report Card
on K-12 Public Schools. Online Link (APS
Presented) http//reportcard2007.gaosa.org/(tw25y3
bt2uznqf45s3v5i455)/k12/demographics.aspX?ID761A
LLTestKeyEnRTestTypedemographics
18
Context Participating College and Universities
in Metro Atlanta
College/ University Enrollment Characteristics Goal(s)
Georgia State University More than 27,000 students The second largest university in the state, with students coming from every county in Georgia, every state in the nation, and over 145 countries Teacher Competency (K-12) Student Achievement Teacher Retention New Teacher Recruitment
Clark Atlanta University 4,271 students A comprehensive, private, urban, coeducational institution of higher education and a Historically Black College/University New Teacher Recruitment
Georgia Perimeter College More than 21,000 students The largest 2-year institution in Georgia, serving a diverse community with minority enrollment reaching 55 New Teacher Recruitment
19
Quasi-Experimental Design
  • Entries in the cells are outcome measurements
    such as CRCT, Constructed Response and Student
    Surveys
  • Schools are matched on free and reduced lunch,
    ethnicity, and previous academic achievement

Baseline Year 2005
School Systems 12 PDS Schools E M H 12 Comparison Schools E M H
Atlanta
DeKalb
Fulton
Gwinnett
20
Input Overview of Intervention
  • MOSTLY SCHOOL LEVEL INTERVENTIONS
  • -- Support from Grants
  • -- 12 to 15 University Faculty Coordinators
  • -- School Interns
  • -- Arts Sciences faculty involved
  • --Scholarships (40 per year for students across
    three Universities)
  • --Needs Evaluation Yearly
  • -- Spring Retreats - PDS goals and activities
  • -- Educational Support for K-12 Teachers
    Pathways
  • --Teacher Support Specialist Training
  • -- Courses for K-12 teachers
  • -- Resources Books materials from the PDS2
    Grant
  • -- Evaluation Coordinators in each School System
  • -- Teacher-Intern-Professor Model (TIP)
    (Classroom Level)
  • -- Anchor Action Research (Classroom Level)

21
From the Grant Directors LensDr. Dee Taylor
22
PDS Promises How to Stand and Deliver
23
Standards Model from Teitel, L. (2003). The
Professional Development Schools Handbook
24
PDS Standards Rubric
PDS STANDARD I Learning Community Level Beginning Level Developing Level At Standard Level Leading
Support Multiple Learners
Work and Practice are Inquiry-Based and Focused on Learning
Develop a Common Shared Professional Vision of Teaching Learning Grounded in Research and Practitioner Knowledge
Serve as Instrument of Change
Extended Learning Community
PDS STANDARD II Accountability Quality Assurance
Develop Professional Accountability
Assure Public Accountability
Set PDS Participation Criteria
Develop Assessments, Collect Information, and Use Results
Engage with the PDS Context
PDS STANDARD III Collaboration
Engage in Joint Work
Design Roles and Structures to Enhance Collaboration and Develop Parity
Systematically Recognize and Celebrate Joint Work and Contributions of Each Partner
PDS STANDARD IV Diversity Equity
Ensure Equitable Opportunities to Learn
Equate Policies and Practices to Support Equitable Learning Outcomes
Recruit and Support Diverse Participants
PDS STANDARD V Structures, Resources, and Roles
Establish Governance and Support Structures
Ensure Progress Towards Goals
Create PDS Roles
Resources
Use Effective Communication
Adapted from NCATE Standards for Professional
Development Schools, 2001
25
Peachtree School Plan
Professional Learning Activities/ goals to improve student achievement Description of activities TIMELINE/ funding MEANS OF EVALUATION MEANS OF EVALUATION PDS STANDARD
Professional Learning Activities/ goals to improve student achievement Description of activities TIMELINE/ funding Evidence of Monitoring (Artifacts) Evidence of Impact (Student Learning Data)
Collaboration Training and ICE training Increased ELL and Exceptional education students required an collaborative inclusion training Summer fall 2007 2,200 stipends Increased planning collaboration between content specialist, ELL and Exceptional education teachers Increased CRCT scores I. Learning Community
Writing workshop, scorers Workshop designed to increase students writing ability through process writing. Spring 2008 600 stipends Increased student achievement (grade point average and test scores) III. Collaboration V. Structures, Resources, and Roles
Pre-service teacher leaders Fall 2007-spring 2008 600 stipend Supervision of pre-service teachers V. Structures, Resources, and Roles
Teacher researcher 8th grade students engaged survey data collection 750 stipends Survey Data collection II. Accountability and Quality Assurance
Site coordinator Creation of PDS plan, coordinator all professional learning activities 750 stipend PDS plan submission I. Learning Community V. Structures, Resources, and Roles
26
University Faculty asked
  • How do we access schools for
  • possible research?

27
Inquiry Projects
  • Inquiry Project Overview
  • Inquiry Projects help to facilitate the ongoing
    professional learning and to incorporate the
    recommendations of Nation Council for
    Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) to
    engage in continuous learning and self study
    (NCATE, 2001) the university implemented Inquiry
    Projects in 2000.
  • The Inquiry Project involves schools forming
    study groups to explore topics of interest or
    concern. The process normally involves a
    selection of the topic through either a review of
    the school Southern Association of Colleges and
    Schools (SACS) report or a survey of the faculty
    followed by a literature review to further
    explore the topic.
  • Surveys of the faculty, parents, or students may
    also be conducted to gain additional insight.
    Faculty members from the university serve as
    members of the inquiry teams or as resources as
    needed during the inquiry process. Schools are
    encouraged to implement finding of the inquiry
    projects within their school and to share their
    findings with the other schools in the PDS
    network.

28
Inquiry Projects Input From University and
School-Based Coordinators
  • Elementary Level
  • Inquiry study could provide teacher empowerment,
    shared responsibility, equal voice, and a moral
    booster
  • Problem solving with the goals of personal,
    professional, and community growth
  • Use of natural resources such as staff,
    community, and university
  • Facilitate the school as a learning community in
    the following ways
  • Staff feels connected/vested
  • Professionalism
  • Improve student achievement
  • Systematic approach to solving/addressing
    problems
  • Middle School Level
  • Grassroots on issues that are important
  • Learning environment for teachers and students
  • Implement change at the school level
  • Issues are addressed and maybe solved
  • Direct effect on instruction
  • Collaboration among teachers (and administration)
  • Create a sense of community
  • Individual Reflection
  • High School Level

29
Anchor Action Research
Investigators and School Partner Research Teams Proposal Titles
Nesbit Elementary School Dr. Laura Smith with Ms. Javon McPherson, Ms. Rachel Khodadadi, Ms. Jeanette Sung, Ms. Dana Kim, and Ms. August Dale New Approach to Teaching Geometry
Dunwoody Elementary School Dr. Julie Dangel with Ms. Patrice Dawkins-Jackson Handwriting Without Tears
Peachtree Charter Middle School Dr. Mary Ariail with Ms. Crystal Robinson and Ms. Kimberle Scott Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Writing
Cary Reynolds Elementary School Dr. Amy Flint with Ms. Susan Barwick and Mr. Jeffrey Gentry Becoming Writers in Schools and Communities
North Springs High School Dr. Chara Bohan with Ms. Gwen Kaminsky Research of Primary Source Documents in AP Psychology
Meadowcreek High School Dr. Joe Feinberg with Mr. Chris Hellyer, Ms. Barbara Fudge, Mr. Robert Richmond, and Mr. Harvey Gratz Painting a Brighter Picture by Uniting Art and History in an Interdisciplinary Anchor Action Research Project
Kimberly Elementary School Dr. Brian Williams with Dr. Lou Matthews, Ms. Karen Ross, and Ms. Thea Johnson Radical Mathematics An Investigation of the Effects of a P-5 Mathematics Endorsement on Urban Elementary Student Achievement
Woodland Middle School Dr. Susan Crim-McClendon with Ms. Lauren Hardy and Ms. Vivan Randolph Writing Skills Improvement for ELL and Special Education Students
30
Research Department asked
  • How to ensure effective evaluation and not
    over-assess

31
PDS Assessment Overview
  • Constructed Response Assessment
  • Administered in grades 4, 8, and 11 for PDS and
    comparison schools
  • Given in content areas of math, English/language
    Arts, science
  • Student Survey
  • Given to students who participate in the
    Constructed Response Assessment
  • Teacher Survey
  • Given to teachers who participate in the
    Constructed Response Assessment
  • Internet Teacher Survey
  • Given to all teachers in PDS and comparison
    schools

32
PDS Professional Pathways
Professional Support Pathways 2007-08 Professional Support Pathways 2007-08 Professional Support Pathways 2007-08
These are the three types of support (pathways) to advance PDS teachers credentials and skills. Teachers can apply for the limited number of GRA slots (see Pathways 2 below). Professional Development Schools Kimberly Elementary, Cary Reynolds Elementary, Nesbit Elementary, Dunwoody Springs Elementary, Oak Knoll Elementary, Bunche Middle, Peachtree Middle, Lilburn Middle, Sandy Springs Middle, Woodland Middle, Therrell High, Cross Keys High, Meadowcreek High, North Springs High, and Tri-Cities High These are the three types of support (pathways) to advance PDS teachers credentials and skills. Teachers can apply for the limited number of GRA slots (see Pathways 2 below). Professional Development Schools Kimberly Elementary, Cary Reynolds Elementary, Nesbit Elementary, Dunwoody Springs Elementary, Oak Knoll Elementary, Bunche Middle, Peachtree Middle, Lilburn Middle, Sandy Springs Middle, Woodland Middle, Therrell High, Cross Keys High, Meadowcreek High, North Springs High, and Tri-Cities High These are the three types of support (pathways) to advance PDS teachers credentials and skills. Teachers can apply for the limited number of GRA slots (see Pathways 2 below). Professional Development Schools Kimberly Elementary, Cary Reynolds Elementary, Nesbit Elementary, Dunwoody Springs Elementary, Oak Knoll Elementary, Bunche Middle, Peachtree Middle, Lilburn Middle, Sandy Springs Middle, Woodland Middle, Therrell High, Cross Keys High, Meadowcreek High, North Springs High, and Tri-Cities High
Pathways 1 Endorsement Opportunities Pathways 2 Summer Scholars Program Masters, Specialist, or Ph.D. Pathways 3 Alternative Prep. Programs
ESOL (P-12) Teacher Support Specialist Mathematics (P-5) Reading (P-12) Science (P-5) Endorsement program participants will receive PLUs only. ONE endorsement per district, if requested Courses taught in school districts/PDS clusters Cohorts of 12-15 students Contact Person Dr. Dee Taylor - dtaylor29_at_gsu.edu Phone (404) 463-4549 or 4728 Student must be accepted into a specific program of study before applying. Fulfill all entrance requirements. See GSU on-line college catalogue for available programs at www.gsu.edu Degree requirements are determined by the catalogue under which participants begin their study. The GSU application deadline for summer semester is February 1st. Applicants should apply online and also notify Patsy Terry (PDS Pathway II Coordinator) of their intent to apply for Pathway II funds. Pathway II candidates must be endorsed by their principal to represent their school as a pathway scholar. Pathway II candidates must apply by April 1st for GRA status and will work with an assigned faculty member during summer semester. Number of slots per the 4 PDS districts 15 distributed to 4 districts - (3) per APS, DCSS, GCSS (6) for FCSS (any unused school slots can be used by other PDS principals within the district) Persons Eligible for Pathways II funding support include the following PDS educators who are NEW applicants who gain acceptance in graduate programs (by the deadlines above) PDS educators (teachers or administrators) who are currently enrolled in GSU graduate programs and who wish to use funding support toward courses of study. (Applicants can only participate in the PDS Summer Scholars Program twice) Amount of funding per person 1,320 Commitment during summer 20 hours per week (i.e., GRA research-related time commitment) GRA _at_ 2.5 appointments - may (a) take up to 3 courses (in addition to the required GRA course), must (b) pay approximately 469 in student fees, and must (c) show proof of health insurance. This GRA is at the Masters level. Even if the person is accepted for a Ph.D., he/she will be hired at the Master's level. Contact Person Patsy Terry, pterry_at_gsu.edu (404) 344-1770 _________________________________________________________________________________ Application Procedure for Applying for PDS Funds 1. Apply to GSU Program. Be accepted in Program of Study. 2. After being accepted. Notify your principal to be included among school-based applicant pool for his/her final building-level selection. 3. If you are selected as your schools PDS Pathway II Scholar, principals must verify your selection as the scholar from your school (must send your name/school/phone/email address electronically to Patsy Terry at pterry_at_gsu.edu (and copy Dr. Dee Taylor - dtaylor29_at_gsu.edu). Principals will be asked to provide ONE alternate applicant who will need to follow these same procedures. 4. Once verified as the PDS Pathway II Scholar from your school, expect notification and PDS Pathways II GRA Application. 5. Complete the PDS Pathways II GRA Application (include your GSU Letter of Acceptance to Program of Study). Send the completed application to Patsy Terry by Monday, May 5, 2008. 6. PDS University Liaisons (ECE and MSIT) will review applications and assign PDS Scholar/GRA to a GSU faculty/administrators to guide summer research/work (based on research interests, available faculty, etc.). 7. Expect to hear from Regina Speights, PDS Business Manager, about next steps for processing your paperwork with GSU Human Resources, etc. 8. Expect a required meeting for all GRAs in June prior to summer classes outlining expectations. Target audience Career Changers, Teachers seeking High Quality Certification Masters Special Education Certification (EPSE) TEEMS (MSIT) Urban Alternative Prep Program (ECE) Must be accepted into the appropriate GSU program (entry level only). Meet all entrance requirements. Scholarships for these programs are available but not guaranteed. Scholarships are service repayable. Contact Person Tracye Moore tracyemoore16_at_gsu.edu Phone (404) 651-3677 Courses taught in PDS school districts/PDS cluster schools and/or on GSU campus Applications available during summer semester
33
PDS Pathway II 2007Summer Scholars
Name/School Program Assigned Faculty
Cassandra Matthews Nesbit ES Early Childhood EDS Laura Smith
Michele Mark Dunwoody Springs ES ECE(Masters) Julie Dangel
Tara Beaner Dunwoody Springs ES Educational Policy Studies (PhD) Research, Measurement, and Statistics Lori Elliott/Literacy Clinic (Francis Howard/Lee Daily)
Shannon Kersey Meadowcreek HS Educational Policy Studies Educational Leadership Donna Breault
Terry Harness North Springs HS Educational Policy Studies Masters in Educational Leadership Christine Thomas
Lisa Beavers Cross Keys HS Master of Art Education Mariama Ross/ Melody Milbrandt
Crystal Robinson Peachtree MS MSIT (PhD) Language and Literacy Lori Elliott /Literacy Clinic (Francis Howard/Lee Daily)
Sarah Mantegna North Springs HS MSIT (PhD) Language and Literacy Gertrude Tinkers Sachs
Jessica Janasiewicz Reynolds ES MSIT , Language, and Literacy Lori Elliott/Literacy Clinic (Francis Howard/Lee Daily)
34
Lessons Learned
  • Time Before the Beginning
  • Integration of Professional and Student Learning
    Through Inquiry
  • Placing Students at the Center of PDS Work
  • Learning in the Context of Practice
  • Boundary Spanning
  • Blending of Resources
  • Principal Partners and Institutional Partners
  • The Expanded Learning Community
  • The PDS as a Standards-Bearing Institution
  • Leveraging Change

35
PDS Student Teacher
Donna Lowery interview with Sherelle McIntosh
36
GSU Graduates/First Year Teachers asked
  • Am I prepared for teaching?

1st Year teacher, Katie, of Nesbit ES
37
From the School Level PerspectiveAndrew Foster
38
Meadowcreek High School
  • Profile
  • 2,450 Students
  • Diverse Student Population
  • 23 African American
  • 53 Latino/Hispanic
  • 4.1 White
  • 14.3 Asian
  • 5.6 Other
  • 78 Free/reduced Lunch

39
Meadowcreek High School
  • Collaboration Goals
  • Teacher Mentoring/Induction
  • GSU Intern Mentoring/Induction
  • Staff Development/Continuing Education

40
Meadowcreek High School
  • PDS Goals
  • New teacher orientation
  • NCATE/PDS Standards I, II, III, IV, V
  • Mentoring relationships
  • NCATE/PDS Standards III and V
  • Support teams
  • NCATE/PDS Standards II, III and V
  • Workshops and training for beginning teachers
  • NCATE/PDS Standards I, II, III, IV, V
  • Workshops and training for mentors NCATE/PDS
    Standards I, II, III, IV, V

41
McCoSS Meadowcreek Catalysis of Students
SuccessA Georgia State University PDS Program
  • Purpose
  • To provide a systematic structure of support for
    beginning teachers/pre-service teacher
  • First Year Teachers/Pre-Service
  • Teachers New to Meadowcreek
  • To increase retention

42
McCoSS Meadowcreek Catalysis of Students
SuccessA Georgia State University PDS Program
  • Program Overview
  • New Teacher/PDS Orientation
  • Mentorship Program
  • The N.E.S.T. (New Educators Support Team)
  • Mentoring
  • Reflection
  • Release time
  • Collaborative learning community

43
McCoSS Meadowcreek Catalysis of Students
SuccessA Georgia State University PDS Program
  • Workshops and Training for beginning teachers
  • Staff Development
  • Professional Learning
  • After school and Saturday Sessions
  • Support Teams
  • Evaluation
  • Formal
  • Walk-thru
  • Peer evaluations

44
Funding Perspective Resources and Funding
Opportunities Leveraging/Sustaining
  • Dr. Susan Ogletree

45
Funding Opportunities
  • Grant.gov central storehouse for information on
    over 1,000 grant programs and provides access to
    approximately 400 billion in annual awards
  • Link http//www.grants.gov

46
Funding Opportunities
  • Community of Science provider of information
    resources to researchers and scholars at more
    than 1,600 universities worldwide
  • Link http//www.cos.com

47
Funding Opportunities
  • Foundation Center Subscription required
    Nations leading authority on philanthropy,
    connecting nonprofits and grant makers maintain
    the most comprehensive database on US grant
    makers and their grants
  • Link http//foundationcenter.org

48
Resources or Whats in it for me?
  • University Faculty
  • Entré into the school system
  • Research/publication opportunities
  • Course releases
  • Travel/dissemination support

49
Resources or Whats in it for me?
  • School Faculty
  • Research stipend for class participation
  • Materials supplies for the school
  • Teacher stipends/pathways opportunity to
    receive tuition support for initial certification
    or additional degree
  • Travel/dissemination support

50
Layering of Grants Interlocking Support
  • PDS2 U.S. Department of Education
  • PRISM subcontract National Science Foundation
  • Pathways of Effective Teaching Through
    Communities of Support NCTAF/Wachovia Grant
  • Early College High School subcontract with
    Atlanta Public Schools Bill and Melinda Gates
    Foundation

51
The Business of Grant Implementation
  • Establish relationship with school system all
    levels
  • Collaborative grant discussions
  • Develop grant/research design collaboratively
  • Develop budget collaboratively when appropriate

52
Key Processes How to Operationalize a PDS Grant
  • University
  • Memoranda of Understanding Regarding
    Collaborative Partnership
  • Faculty Buy-outs
  • Post Award Management
  • School System
  • Language of implementation
  • Cost reimbursable vs. fixed price
  • Stipends vs. honoraria

53
Sustainability Institutionalizing PDS Program
  • Embedding the PDS mind set
  • Expand the academic culture beyond the university
    campus to include PDS
  • Change in promotion and tenure requirements
  • Identifying additional funding resources

54
School District Coordination and
CollaborationDr. Colin Martin
55
Gwinnett County Public Schools
  • One of four GSU partner districts in metropolitan
    Atlanta
  • Atlanta Public Schools
  • DeKalb County Public Schools
  • Fulton County Public Schools
  • Rapid growth
  • Rapid urbanization
  • High leadership stability and drive

56
GCPS Demographics
  • More than 155,000 students (average of nearly
    12,000 students per grade)
  • Usual net growth over 4,000 students per year
  • 110 large schools
  • 41 eligible for subsidized meals
  • 61 minority

57
Core Business
  • Teaching
  • Curriculum Academic Knowledge Skills
  • Instruction Quality-Plus Teaching Strategies
  • Assessment Gateway Assessment Program
  • and Learning
  • Student engagement

58
PDS2 Collaboration
  • Common vision for learning
  • Student learning
  • Organizational learning
  • Focus on highest-needs schools
  • Sharing of resources
  • Human
  • Financial

59
Commitment
  • Articulation of a partnership plan
  • Senior leaderships involvement
  • Contractual agreements
  • Principals buy-in
  • Professors dedication
  • Teachers engagement

60
The Data Connection
  • PDS2 evaluation plan
  • Extensive collection of quantitative and
    qualitative data
  • Collaboration between university PI and district
    research director

61
Research Assistant
  • Funded by PDS grant
  • Hired and supervised by GCPS
  • Trained
  • data collection
  • data queries and data management
  • interviewing techniques
  • scoring procedures

62
Coordination
  • Professor, site coordinator and teacher
    coordination
  • Data collection
  • Materials distribution and collection
  • Permissions and student confidentiality
  • Assessment and survey administrations
  • Interviews
  • Database queries and data management

63
Promising Practices
  • Depth and richness of data collection
  • Teacher-Intern-Professor (TIP) model
  • Mini grants

64
  • Overview of PDS2 Evaluation Results
  • PDS2 Data Summary
  • Professional Development Schools and Comparison
    Schools
  • Formative Evaluation PDS2 Evolution
  • Dr. Bill Curlette

65
Evaluation Approaches used in PDS2
  • Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) Model
    (Stufflebeam) Four Evaluations
  • Logic Model (Wholey, Patton) Flowchart with
    Rational
  • Utilization Focused (Patton) Higher
    Utilization if involve Stakeholders

66
Example of Degree of Equality of PDSs and CS on
CRCT for ELA at Baseline Before PDS2 Intervention
  • PDS and CS Graph Plotting Proportions of Students
    in a School in Basic Category by School on CRCT
    2004-05 Reading and English/Language Arts

67
Process and Product Evaluation Measurement
Instruments
  • 41 Item Student Survey in grades 4, 8, 11
  • 133 Item Paper and Pencil Teacher Survey for
    teachers in grades 4, 8, 11
  • Internet Survey for all Teachers (approx. 15
    background items and 92 items on PDS Fidelity of
    Implementation Survey)
  • Georgia CRCT and HSGT Statewide Achievement Tests
    (multiple choice only)
  • Constructed Response Exercises for Student
    Achievement (open ended responses) in grades 4,
    8, 11
  • Principal, Teacher, and Student Interviews

68
Example of Constructed Response Exercise
  • Madison pulled her winter jacket tightly around
    her. She tried to make herself feel warm by
    thinking about the cozy fireplace back at her
    house. Just then, Madison noticed her mothers
    friend, Mrs. Russell, pull up in her car. Mrs.
    Russell looked at her soaking wet, cold neighbor
    and said, My goodness, Madison, you look like
    you really need a ride home! Madison happily
    got in and thanked Mrs. Russell. Then Madison
    began to tell Mrs. Russell how she had ended up
    in that soggy situation.
  • Had Madison expected that type of weather?
  • How do you know?
  • Write a paragraph to explain what you think
    happens next.

69
Overview of Constructed Response Exercises
  • Alternate way to measure student achievement
    other than multiple choice tests 4 items given
    in 4, 8, 11 grades for English/Language Arts,
    Mathematics, and Science
  • Two raters who were certified teachers judged
    each item (interjudge agreement over 95)
  • A few high school year 2 items had some revisions
    (but same items for both PDS and CS groups)
  • No statistically significant differences
    descriptive results slightly favor PDS especially
    in science

70
Essentially no difference between PDS and CS
schools at baseline and no difference after year
1 or year 2 (except for homework hours)
Student and Teacher Data from Survey of Teachers
and Students in Grades 4, 8, and 11 in both PDS
and CS
71
Student Achievement Using Georgia CRCT in Science
and Mathematics
  • Quasi-experimental design used with Matching on
    achievement and demographic variables
  • Data set included 26,529 students
  • Mathematics and science scaled scores were
    dependent variables on CRCT HSGT
  • Change in Statewide Curriculum from Quality Core
    Curriculum (QCC) to Georgia Performance Standards
    (GPS) during study. ELA scores not comparable
    from baseline to year 1.
  • Year, treatment, and ethnicity were independent
    variables

72
CRCT Evaluation Results
  • In general, there was no significant mean
    differences between baseline and Year 1 PDS2
    schools or between PDS2 schools and comparison
    schools in academic achievement in mathematics
    and science or by racial/ethnic groups. No
    closing of the gap for ethnic groups. There was
    some variation among schools.

73
Discussion of CRCT Results
  • Difficult to obtain difference in achievement
    test scores over systems - reform rarely occurs
    in a short period of time (Southern Regional
    Education Board, 2006)
  • Give consideration to the level of development of
    the PDS Takes many years to fully implement PDS
    programs
  • Resources needed for school level results

74
Teacher-Intern-Professor (TIP) Model
  • Classroom level intervention for student
    achievement
  • 3 Roles
  • Teacher
  • Intern
  • Professor
  • More focused approach to supporting teaching
    interns and increasing student achievement

2008 AERA Conference
75
Process (Formative Evaluation) Result after
second year is to suggest Teacher-Intern-Professor
(TIP) Groups
  • Several cooperating teachers with student
    teaching interns meet with a university
    professor twice each month
  • Extending internship to one year
  • Mini-Grants for TIP Group Project (e.g., Action
    Research)
  • TIP Group is guided by NCATE PDS Standards

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Teacher-Intern-Professor (TIP) Model
Preliminary Results
  • A TIP group was in operation for 4 months. The
    focus of the TIP group was a 4th Grade Geometry 9
    week unit.
  • Data, on student academic achievement, was
    collected using a Geometry pretest and posttest
    which was created by teachers and interns.
  • Appears to be at least 10 point difference on
    the post test with the TIP group having higher
    achievement. (Scores ranged from 10 to 98
    correct across pretest and post test.)

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Anchor Action Research (AAR)
  • TIP elected to conduct an AAR
  • The Anchors
  • Quantitative data for student achievement
  • Instructional practice and/or delivery of
    curriculum
  • Summary of results to be accomplished using
    meta-analysis
  • Anchor Action Research Mini-Grant program is
    designed to promote inquiry-based research (may
    be mixed methods) in PDS participant classrooms
  • 8 Mini Grants have been awarded in PDS schools
    (inquiry - university faculty involved)
  • Named by William Curlette, 2007

78
PDS Differential Implementation Fidelity
Inventory (PDS DIF-I)
  • Items are based on NCATE PDS Standards
  • 92 Items for Teachers responded to with Yes,
    No, or Unsure.
  • During the last year
  • 1. I worked with university faculty who were
    interested in my research questions.
  • 2. I provided feedback to a university about
    curriculum and teacher education.

79
PDS DIF-I Initial Results of On-Going Study
  • Group Difference Study Item Responses which
    Differentiate between PDS Teachers and Comparison
    School Teachers
  • After one year of implementation, 50 of the 92
    items had higher proportion of Yes responses.
    Many of the items with higher proportions of
    Yes responses related to the partnership
    regarding its existence and structural issues.

80
PDS DIF-I Initial Results of On-Going Study
(after 1 year)
  • Factor Analysis of Item Responses based on
    correlations of items which differentiated
    between PDSs and CS
  • Preliminary results (5 factors)
  • General Factor Collaboration
  • Diversity and Equity (NCATE, urban sch.)
  • Benefits to school
  • Collaboration Recognize joint work
  • Personal level partnership

81
Conclusions for PDS2 Formative Evaluation
Moving Ahead
  • Use TIP Model to focus on student achievement at
    the classroom level
  • Use Anchor Action Research to involve faculty in
    PDSs through supporting their research
  • Use Fidelity of Implementation Survey to help
    understand stages of PDS implementation
  • Use qualitative research for needs analysis and
    documentation

82
Conclusions for PDS2 Formative Evaluation
Moving Ahead
  • Partnership activities are increasing (additional
    schools are PDSs, 38 increase from first year in
    students taking Constructed Response Exercises)
  • PDS Interns are sought after by school systems
  • Stronger relationships between universities and
    school systems

83
Approaches to Documenting the Impact of PDS The
Benedum Collaborative at West Virginia
University West Virginia Partnerships for Teacher
Quality Dr. Jaci Webb-Dempsey
84
Underlying Commitments
  • Simultaneous renewal requires us to engage in
    powerfully productive symbioses (Goodlad, 1994,
    p. 103)
  • Research on the impact of the process of
    simultaneous renewal should rely on a similar
    engagement and mutually beneficial
    capacity-building
  • Embrace differences
  • Recognize powerful contextual contingencies

85
Institutional Context
  • The Benedum Collaborative
  • Support from the Claude Worthington Benedum
    Foundation
  • Engaging in simultaneous renewal of 27 PDSs, West
    Virginia University, and the teacher education
    program delivered collaboratively across both
    settings since 1995

86
History
  • First five years PDS development (the Benedum
    Project)
  • Transition period (the Benedum Collaborative)
  • Past ten years installation of the Benedum
    Collaborative Five-Year Teacher Education Program

87
Documentation Efforts
  • Impact of PDS on the renewal of schools,
    teachers practice and PK-12 students learning
  • Development of a culture of inquiry through
    teacher and teacher education candidates action
    research initiatives
  • Effects of partnership-based preparation on
    teacher education graduates and their students

88
Impact of PDS
  • Benedum Project
  • PDS Belief Statements
  • 13 PDSs
  • Interviews and surveys with PDS faculty, teacher
    candidates, PK-12 students
  • Stakeholders concerned with bottom line
  • Partners concerned with capacity building
  • Informing development of PDSs
  • Growing researchers and critical consumers

89
Strategies
  • Focus on site-based reforms to yield
    accountability data
  • Broad-based stakeholder advisory group
  • Collaborative research team

90
Outcomes
  • Reminder of or introduction to core beliefs
  • Informed operationalization
  • Contextualization
  • Increased support and participation
  • Increased impact of results

91
Development of a Culture of Inquiry
  • Action research projects in Five-Year Program
  • AR Faculty, Teacher Education Coordinator Network
  • Action research on AR
  • AR Fellows
  • AR Fellows Teams

92
Strategies
  • Creating and taking advantage of opportunities
    for dissemination
  • Professional development
  • Layered implementation
  • In classes
  • In schools
  • University and PDS faculty

93
Outcomes
  • Transparency
  • Cross-cultural support
  • University and PDS culture
  • Culture of disciplinary inquiry
  • More substantive candidate projects
  • Elevation of teacher inquiry

94
Graduates Study
  • Relational database
  • Graduate interviews
  • Site visits
  • Classroom observations
  • Interviews with graduates, their mentor teachers,
    principal

95
Strategies
  • Negotiate multiple agendas
  • Informing policy
  • Informing stakeholders
  • Program improvement
  • Professional needs and interests

96
Outcomes
  • Multiple benefits
  • State level discourse around teacher preparation
  • Improvements in coursework and clinical
    placements
  • Scholarly activity
  • Intrinsic rewards

97
Statewide Context
  • WV Partnerships for Teacher Quality
  • Consortium of all 10 public higher education
    institutions engaged in teacher preparation since
    2004
  • Leadership from key stakeholders and the Benedum
    Collaborative
  • Annual legislative funding to support and
    establish school/university partnerships and PDSs

98
History
  • Participation in FIPSE PDS Standards Project
  • Adoption of targeted NCATE PDS Standards (as
    translated by the FIPSE PDS Standards Project) as
    accountability framework
  • Statewide study commissioned by stakeholders
  • Case studies of 4 school/university partnerships
  • Online survey

99
Strategies
  • Cross-institutional planning
  • Cross-institutional research team
  • Alignment of funding proposals, reporting,
    targeted standards
  • Self-analysis
  • Initiative level analysis
  • Developmental perspective

100
Outcomes
  • Broad support
  • Coherency
  • National standards
  • Shared expectations
  • Common discourse

101
Suggested Principles
  • Capacity-Building
  • Respect perspectives of all partners
  • Ground research on partnerships in the contexts
    of the work
  • Reflect the guiding beliefs of the partnership
  • Enhance opportunities for collaboration,
    represent all constituencies
  • Make documentation a naturally and regularly
    occurring activity

102
NCATE PDS Standards The Driving Force for
State-wide PDS Implementation Dr. Jane Neapolitan

103
NCATE PDS Standards
  • Implications for Research, Policy, School Reform

104
Background
  • 1980s partnership schools, e.g., professional
    practice schools (AFT)
  • 1986 Tomorrows Teachers
  • 1990 Tomorrows Schools
  • 1995 Tomorrows Schools of Education
  • 1995-2001 NCATE PDS Standards Project

105
Challenges for PDS Standards
  • PDSs as collaborative institutions
  • Uniqueness of locality/context
  • Varying stages of development (Levine
    Trachtman, 2005)

106
Why are PDS Standards Important?
  • Continuous improvement
  • Partnership development
  • Assessment process
  • Teacher quality agenda
  • Critical framework for conducting evaluating
    research (NCATE, 2001)

107
PDS Research
  • Distinction between research in and research
    on PDS (Berry Boles, 1998)
  • Fugitive literature (Abdal-Haqq, 1998)
  • Abundance of qualitative studies (Teitel, 2004)
  • Does not meet standard criteria as research
    (Breault Breault, 2004)

108
Culture of Evidence Accountability
  • In my view, we need to move beyond the brief
    self-descriptions of PDSs that we see in the
    current research, to more elaborated
    understandings of the ways in which particular
    aspects of PDSs are implemented in practice
    (Zeichner, 2007, p. 15).

109
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110
A Framework for Research on PDS (2007)
  • Review of 400 abstracts in EBSCO host, 1988-2006
  • 1991-1994 78 descriptions/stories, ideas,
    case studies
  • 1997-2002 13 surveys
  • Overall, PDS as a phenomenon presented in a
    well-documented, non-research based format.

111
Themes across PDS Eras
  • Growing Era (1991-1994) conceptual frameworks,
    contexts, collaboration
  • Functioning Era (1995-2000) increase in surveys
    for assessing impacts, learning community,
    policies standards (7), diversity equity
    (3), comparisons (10)
  • Accountability Era (2001-2006) Return to
    qualitative methods with focus on context only 6
    quasi-experimental studies no experimental
    studies

112
PDS Standards Policy
  • NCATE PDS Standards (2001) PDS as a new
    institution for leveraging change affecting
    policy in education
  • Maryland PDS Standards (2003) partnership for
    the academic and clinical preparation of interns
    and the continuous professional development of
    both school system and IHE faculty

113
PDS Impact Framework
  • Collaborative project funded by U.S. Dept. of
    Education (FIPSE), 2005-2007
  • PDS Impact Framework based on an adaptation of
    the Maryland PDS Standards with cross-references
    to the NCATE PDS Standards
  • Features self-assessment tool, data storage, and
    reporting capability
  • Managed by Association of Teacher Educators (ATE)
    beginning August 2008.

114
PDS School Reform
  • Is the purpose of PDS to prepare new teachers or
    reform/renew schooling?
  • How has NCLB and AYP affected PDS?
  • What are the connections between type of IHE and
    PDS research?
  • What processes are used for PDS self-assessment?
  • What is the role of PDS evaluation?
  • Should the NCATE PDS Standards be revised?

115
How to Operationalize the NCATE/PDS Standards
Moving to a Shared Definition of PDS Dr. Joyce
Many
116
GSUs Work to Construct a Shared Definition of
PDS to Reflect Our Unique Needs
  • Program faculty within multiple departments had
    developed their own working definitions as a
    result of their own work with PDS schools
  • The design team compiled definitions from NCATE,
    the state, other institutions, and GSU
    departments
  • Yearlong process of working with PDS partners to
    developed a shared understanding of our multiple
    perspectives across sites, grade levels, and
    subject areas
  • In the process of establishing bylaws and
    policies and procedures for how partners can
    become a PDS

117
GSUs Work to Construct a Shared Definition of
PDS to Reflect Our Unique Needs
  • Professional Development School (PDS). A P12
    school, or schools, in partnership with a
    professional education unit with a mission to
    prepare new teachers and other educators, support
    professional development, support inquiry
    directed at the improvement of professional
    practice, and improve student learning.
    (NCATE Standards for Professional
    Development Schools, 2001)
  • Professional development schools that are part of
    the Metro-Atlanta Professional Development School
    Network are birth-grade 12 schools, centers,
    and/or networks of subject area teachers across a
    district, that are innovative sites of
    collaboration with Georgia State Universitys
    Professional Education Unit. The mission of the
    metro-Atlanta PDS Network is to prepare new
    teachers and other educators, support
    professional development, support inquiry
    directed at the improvement of professional
    practice, and improve student learning.

118
GSUs Work to Construct a Shared Definition of
PDS to Reflect Our Unique Needs
  • To become a professional development school in
    the Metro-Atlanta Professional Development School
    Network, support for an application must
    demonstrate strong support from
  • faculty and administration (including principal,
    vice principal, and leadership team) at the
    school,
  • faculty and administration (including department
    chairs and program coordinators) from the
    involved programs at the university,
  • the school system (including superintendent and
    other relevant central office personnel if
    necessary),
  • the Professional Education Faculty Executive
    Committee.

119
GSUs Work to Construct a Shared Definition of
PDS to Reflect Our Unique Needs
  • A proposal should be co-constructed by the
    school, district, and university and should be in
    alignment with the NCATE PDS Development
    Guidelines. Proposals should be approximately 2-3
    pages in length. Proposal should be submitted for
    review by the PEF Advisory Committee and PDS Ad
    Hoc Committee.
  • Approved applications would be followed by a
    memorandum of agreement describing the roles and
    responsibilities of each partner and should
    include the term of commitment.

120
Moving to a Shared VisionSmall Group Discussions
  • How does work in field inform work in my PDS
    context?
  • How might work in my PDS context be unique?
  • What questions do I have?

121
BREAKOUT ACTIVITY
  • Directions for Breakout Session
  •  
  • WORK IN SMALL BREAK-OUT GROUPS (based on your
    level of PDS work)
  • TASK I Use your Memory Jogger notes as you
    listen to presenters. Let these questions guide
    your thinking.
  • How does work in field inform work in my PDS
    context?
  • How might work in my PDS context be unique?
  • What questions do I have?
  •  
  • TASK II Using your notes, groups will discuss
    and chart several questions (issues and/or
    concerns) that still need to be addressed, but
    the group will share ONLY the most critical 1-2
    questions that will be shared when the whole
    group reconvenes.
  •  
  • RECONVENE WITH THE WHOLE GROUP
  • Task III Reconvene with the larger group to
    POST and share the most critical 1-2 questions,
    issues and/or concerns that need to be addressed.

122
Thank You for Your Participation !!
Name Title Location Email Address
Dr. Gwen Benson Associate Dean Georgia State University gbenson_at_gsu.edu
Dr. Bill Curlette Professor, Educational Policy Studies and Director for Research and Evaluation for PDS2 Grant Georgia State University wcurlette_at_gsu.edu
Dr. Dee Taylor PDS2 Project Director Georgia State University dtaylor29_at_gsu.edu
Dr. Susan Ogletree Educational Research Bureau Director Georgia State University sogletree1_at_gsu.edu
Dr. Joyce Many Chair of Middle/Secondary Education and Instructional Technology Georgia State University jmany_at_gsu.edu
Ms. August Dale PDS2 Grant GRA Georgia State University adale2_at_student.gsu.edu
Dr. Colin Martin Executive Director of Research Evaluation Gwinnett County Public Schools colin_martin_at_gwinnett.k12.ga.us
Mr. Andrew Foster Assistant Principal Meadowcreek High School, Gwinnett County Public Schools andrew_foster_at_gwinnett.k12.ga.us
Dr. Jaci Webb-Dempsey Assistant Professor in Technology, Learning Culture in the College of Human Resources Education West Virginia University jaci.webb-dempsey_at_mail.wvu.edu
Jane Neapolitan Associate Professor in the Department of Instructional Leadership and Professional Development Director of Graduate Programs in Organizational Change Towson University jneapolitan_at_towson.edu
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