Lean Six Sigma - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Lean Six Sigma PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3f76b5-N2E2M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Lean Six Sigma

Description:

Lean Six Sigma Champion Training Facilitated by: Nathan T. Navarro, MBA * Activities: Promotional Instructional Educate all levels. Project Tracking System Focus and ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:584
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 127
Provided by: JohnBe74
Learn more at: http://nathantnavarro.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Lean Six Sigma


1
  • Lean Six Sigma
  • Champion Training
  • Facilitated by Nathan T. Navarro, MBA

2
Agenda
  • Build a Shared Vision
  • Create a Guiding Coalition
  • Empower Broad-Based Action
  • Generate Short-Term Wins
  • Communicate the Vision
  • Anchor RapidLeanSixSigma in the Culture

3
Leaders Make-It-Happen
  • Lean Six Sigma provides the tools and techniques
    for making decisions and solving problems - fast.
  • An organizations early success will be realized
    through engaged employees using an empowered
    approach for Rapid process improvement.
  • Leaders Make-It-Happen

4
For Discussion
  • 90 of all organizations have attempted some form
    of large scale business change
  • 75 of these attempts fail

Fortune Magazine
5
Activity
What are the three biggest problems were
facing?       
6
Integrating Lean and Six Sigmaspeed and
simplicity
  • Lean
  • Waste Reduction
  • Continuous Flow
  • Customer Pull
  • Six Sigma
  • Eliminate Variation/Process Control
  • Customer Satisfaction

7
Lean Six Sigma
  • Lean Six Sigma promotes a culture that targets
    continuous process improvement through the
    relentless elimination of waste.

8
Champions Role
Stay involved, Actively support, Train,
Communicate, Motivate, and Model the Way.
9
Example Targets
  • Cost Reduction (improved profitability)
  • Continuous Improvement
  • Workforce Engagement
  • Speed and Simplicity

10
Name Them

11
Clarity Consistency Commitment
12
Some Terminology
  • Vision
  • What we are going to look like in the future
  • What were working towards
  • Mission
  • What we do
  • Objectives
  • Things we will achieve by a specific date
  • i.e. in the next 12 18 months
  • These are operational - the business plan for the
    organizations coming year centers around
    accomplishing these tasks!

13
A Structured Approach
Creates
Creates
Creates
VISION
VISION
VISION
VISION
OBJECTIVES
OBJECTIVES
OBJECTIVES
OBJECTIVES
Determines
Necessitates
METRICS
METRICS
METRICS
METRICS
STRATEGY
STRATEGY
STRATEGY
STRATEGY
Facilitates
MASTER
MASTER
MASTER
Action
SCHEDULE
SCHEDULE
SCHEDULE
MONITOR,
MONITOR,
MONITOR,
MONITOR,
REVIEW,
REVIEW,
14
Keeping it Simple
  • Economic Development
  • Employee Engagement

15
Example Elevator Speech
  • Lean Six Sigma provides cost reduction, speed to
    market, and improved profitability.

16
Vision of the FutureTo Be
17
What Is a Vision?
  • A vision is a realistic, credible, attractive and
    inspiring future view for your organization
  • A compelling dream clearly stated, challenging
    and meaningful

18
Vision
  • How the organization wants to be perceived in
    the future what success looks like
  • An expression of the desired end state
  • Challenges everyone to reach for something
    significant inspires a compelling future
  • Provides a long-term focus for the entire
    organization

19
Example of Vision
An agile, flexible and disciplined organization
that employs groups of capable and empowered
people who are learning and working safely
together to produce and deliver products that
consistently exceed customers expectations in
quality, cost, and time.
20
Core Values
21
Core Values
  • Integrity
  • Vitality
  • Stewardship
  • Partnership
  • Teamwork

22
Integrity
  • Integrity is the basing of one's actions on an
    internally consistent framework of principles.
  • One is said to have integrity to the extent that
    everything she/he does and believes is based on
    the same core set of values.
  • While those values may change, it is their
    consistency with each other and with the person's
    actions that determine her/his integrity.

23
Vitality
  • physical or mental vigor
  • power of enduring

24
Stewardship
  • In an organizational context, stewardship refers
    to management's responsibility to properly
    utilize and develop its resources, including its
    people, its property and its financial assets.

25
Partnership
  • A partnership is an association of two or more
    persons ("persons" can include individuals,
    groups of individuals, companies, and
    corporations) partnerships are highly adaptable
    in form and vary in complexity.
  • Each partner shares directly in the control of
    the business operation.

26
Teamwork
  • Teamwork is the concept of people working
    together cooperatively (and effectively).

27
Cultural Values
Other Core Values
  • Customer Satisfaction
  • Pride in Quality
  • Effective Action
  • Teamwork
  • Empowerment
  • Employee Satisfaction
  • Communication

28
Examples of Vision Descriptors
  • Adept
  • Aggressive
  • Agile
  • Aligned
  • Assertive
  • Available
  • Best-in-class
  • Challenging
  • Clear
  • Competent
  • Complex
  • Compliant
  • Conservative
  • Coordinated
  • Critical
  • Direct
  • Equal
  • Disciplined
  • Effective
  • Efficient
  • Enduring
  • Expanding
  • Expert
  • Fast
  • Fast-paced
  • Financially-sound
  • Focused
  • Growth
  • Healthy
  • Improving
  • Incentivized
  • Increasing
  • Solid
  • Solvent
  • Stable
  • State of the Art
  • Strong
  • Streamlined
  • Sufficient
  • Strategic
  • Sustainable
  • Timely
  • Value-added
  • Vigilant
  • Visionary
  • World-class
  • Informative
  • Innovative
  • Leading
  • Logical
  • Major
  • Nimble
  • Pioneering
  • Protected
  • Organized
  • Over-Arching
  • Quick
  • Ready
  • Responsive
  • Savvy
  • Simple

29
Example of Vision
An agile, flexible and disciplined organization
that employs groups of capable and empowered
people who are learning and working safely
together to produce and deliver products that
consistently exceed customers expectations in
quality, cost, and time.
30
For Discussion
  • Biggest Problem Top Leaderships commitment to
    the Lean Six Sigma process.
  • People-side is more complex than the technical
    side.


31
Activity-Assess As Is
  • How do processes operate today?
  • How are they measured?
  • What is managements influence? Role?
    Influence?
  • What is important?
  • What are resource requirements?
  • Who are the change sponsors?
  • What resistance is anticipated? Employees?
    Sponsors? Managers?
  • What are the issues?
  • What other changes are ongoing?
  • What is the organizations change history?

32
Activity-Assess The Gap
  • The Delta, the swamp, the chasm, the in-between
  • Who are the key players?
  • What is the scope of the change?
  • What communication is required?
  • What rewards and recognition are appropriate?
  • What are some possible early wins?
  • What is the learning plan?
  • What is the cost of managing the change?
  • What is the cost of not managing the change?
  • What help do we need? From Who?
  • What further education and training is needed?
  • How will the new behaviors/beliefs/rules be
    institutionalized?

33
  • Often, old structures need to be reformed to
    become more flexible in the face of rapid
    environmental change.

34
Comments for Discussion
  • Developing a sound strategy is not easy
    executing it is even more difficult.
  • Change Management is not just about a plan to
    serve as a blueprint, it requires changing
    peoples mindsets and work practices.

35
Keep a Positive Attitude
  • Your attitude as a Leader will be a major factor
    in determining what the climate is within your
    organization your attitude is one of the few
    things that is totally under your control.
  • Be upbeat, positive and enthusiastic. Model the
    way for your teams.

36
Organizational Planning
Executive Sponsors
Roadmap
Process Owners
Implementation Planning
Coaches
Team
Team
Team
Team
Team
Team
Communication Planning
37
Leading Model

Customer Focus
Business Results
Technical Changes
Business Process Changes
People Behavior Changes

Organization Structural Changes

Workers
Work
Workplace
38
Raise Awareness - Build Enthusiasm
Leadership
Process Owners
Coaches
Workers
39
8th WasteWorkers Who Are Engaged26-55-20
  • 26 engaged (loyal and productive)
  • 55 not engaged (just putting in time)
  • 19 actively disengaged (unhappy and spreading
    their discontent)
  • Source The leadership kit Leadership is
    confusing as hell
  • Fast Company Magazine (p.13)

40
  • Projects often require that people work together
    to accomplish a common goal therefore, teamwork
    is often a negative factor in most organizations.
  • Effective collaborative skills are necessary to
    work well in a team environment.

41
  • Surveys reveal that Americans think that 'being
    a team player' is one of the most important
    factors in getting ahead in the workplace.
  • Being a Team Player was ranked higher than
    several factors, including 'merit and
    performance', 'leadership skills',
    'intelligence', 'making money for the
    organization' and 'long hours'.

42
  • Dont let what you cant do interfere with what
    you can do.

43
Build Behavior First
  • People believe in a new direction because they
    are actually seeing behavior, action, and results
    that lead them to conclude that the program
    works.
  • Use action to gain understanding and commitment.

44
Keys to Implementation
  1. Keep Leaders Involved
  2. Align Lean Six Sigma implementation to Business
    Strategy and Priorities
  3. Keep Message Simple and Clear
  4. Position as Improved Competitiveness and World
    Class
  5. Focus on Short-Term Results
  6. Focus on Long-Term Growth and Development
  7. Make Learning an Ongoing Activity

45
Why Change Efforts Fail
  • 1. Lack of a Sense of Urgency
  • 2. No Guiding Coalition
  • 3. Lack of a Vision and Strategy
  • 4. Failure to communicate the Change Vision
  • 5. Failure to Empower Broad-Based Action
  • 6. Failure to Anchor New Approaches to Values
  • 7. Resistance Underestimated
  • 8. Underestimate communication required
  • 9. Miscalculate the time element
  • 10. Not walking the talk

46
Team Building Roles
47
Individual Team Building Roles
  • 1. The Contributor
  • 2. The Collaborator
  • 3. The Communicator
  • 4. The Challenger

48
The Contributor
  • The Contributor is the task-oriented team
    member who enjoys providing the team with good
    technical information and data, he does his
    homework, and pushes the team to set high
    performance standards and to use their resources
    wisely.

49
The Collaborator
  • The Collaborator is a goal directed member who
    sees the vision. The goal of the team is
    paramount but he is flexible and open to new
    ideas. He is willing to pitch in and work
    outside his defined role, and is willing to share
    the limelight with other team members. Most
    people see him as a big picture person.

50
The Communicator
  • The Communicator is a process oriented member
    who is an effective listener and facilitator of
    involvement, conflict resolution, consensus
    building, feedback, and the building of an
    informal relaxed climate. Most people see him as
    a positive people person.

51
The Challenger
  • The Challenger is a member who questions the
    goals, methods, and even the ethics of the team,
    is willing to disagree with the leader or higher
    authority, and encourages the team to take will
    conceived risks. Most people appreciate the
    value of his candor and openness, but sometimes
    he may not know when to back off.

52
Characteristicsof High Performing Teams
53
High Performing Teams
  • High Performing Teams are small groups of
    individuals whose skills complement each other.
    They are focused on common performance goals,
    purpose and methods to accomplish them. Each
    group member is accountable to the others. They
    develop highly advanced methods of sharing and
    communicating their ideas and data with team
    members and with others outside the team. They
    make sure everyone in the team is involved in
    decisions that affect the team.

54
Management Skills for High Performing Teams
  • Insert figure 9.4

55
How do Teams Work Best?
  • Teams succeed when members have
  • commitment to common objectives
  • defined roles and responsibilities
  • effective decision systems, communication and
    work procedures and,
  • good personal relationships.

56
Characteristics of High Performing Teams
  • Clear purpose
  • Informality
  • Participation
  • Listening
  • Civilized Disagreement
  • Consensus Decisions
  • Open Communication
  • Clear roles and work assignments
  • Shared leadership
  • External Relations
  • Style Diversity
  • Self-assessment

57
Key Elements of High Performing Teams
  • Goals are understood and committed to
  • A climate of trust is reached
  • Open and honest communication
  • A sense of belonging and pride in accomplishments
  • Diversity of opinions and ideas are encouraged
  • Creativity and risk-taking is encouraged
  • The team is constantly learning and improving
    itself
  • Procedures are developed to diagnose, analyze,
    and solve problems
  • Participative leadership is practiced
  • Decisions are supported and made together

58
Stages inTeam Building
59
Stages in Team Building
Forming
Storming
Norming
Performing
60
Stage 1 Forming
  • Task
  • Define problem and strategy
  • Identify information needed
  • Team Building
  • Define team
  • Determine individual roles
  • Develop trust and communication
  • Develop norms

61
Team Roles - Leader
  • Encourage and maintain open communication.
  • Help the team develop and follow team norms.
  • Help the team focus on the task.
  • Deal constructively with conflict.

62
Team Roles - Recorder
  • Keep a record of team meetings.
  • Maintain a record of team assignments.
  • Maintain a record of the team's work.

63
Team Roles PR Person
  • Contact resource people outside of the team.
  • Correspond with the team's mentor.
  • Work to maintain good communication among team
    members.

64
Team Norms
  • How do we support each other?
  • What do we do when we have problems?
  • What are my responsibilities to the team?

65
Stage 2 STORMING
  • During the Storming stage team members
  • realize that the task is more difficult than they
    imagined
  • have fluctuations in attitude about chances of
    success
  • may be resistant to the task and,
  • have poor collaboration.

66
Storming Diagnosis
  • Do we have common goals and objectives?
  • Do we agree on roles and responsibilities?
  • Do our task, communication, and decision systems
    work?
  • Do we have adequate interpersonal skills?

67
Negotiating Conflict
  • Separate problem issues from people issues.
  • Be soft on people, hard on problem.
  • Look for underlying needs, goals of each party
    rather than specific solutions.

68
Addressing the Problem
  • State your views in clear non-judgmental
    language.
  • Clarify the core issues.
  • Listen carefully to each persons point of view.
  • Check understanding by restating the core issues.

69
Stage 3 Norming
  • During this stage members accept
  • their team
  • team rules and procedures
  • their roles in the team and,
  • the individuality of fellow members.
  • Team members realize that they are not going to
    crash-and-burn and start helping each other.

70
Behaviors
  • Competitive relationships become more
    cooperative.
  • There is a willingness to confront issues
  • and solve problems.
  • Teams develop the ability to express criticism
    constructively.
  • There is a sense of team spirit.

71
Giving Constructive Feedback
  • Be descriptive.
  • Don't use labels.
  • Dont exaggerate.
  • Dont be judgmental.
  • Speak for yourself.

72
Giving Constructive Feedback
  • Use I messages.
  • Restrict your feedback to things you know for
    certain.
  • Help people hear and accept your compliments when
    giving positive feedback.

73
Receiving Feedback
  • Listen carefully.
  • Ask questions for clarity.
  • Acknowledge the feedback.
  • Acknowledge the valid points.
  • Take time to sort out what you heard.

74
Stage 4 PERFORMING
  • Team members have
  • gained insight into personal and team processes
  • a better understanding of each others strengths
    and weaknesses
  • gained the ability to prevent or work through
    group conflict and resolve differences and,
  • developed a close attachment to the team.

75
Recipe for Successful Team
  • Commitment to shared goals and objectives
  • Clearly define roles and responsibilities
  • Use best skills of each
  • Allows each to develop in all areas

76
Recipe for Successful Team
  • Effective systems and processes
  • Clear communication
  • Beneficial team behaviors well-defined decision
    procedures and ground rules
  • Balanced participation
  • Awareness of the group process
  • Good personal relationships

77
Dealing With Conflict
78
Workplace Adversaries Substantive Conflict -
about issues, tasks, methods, goals - roughly 25
Personal Conflict - about emotions, needs,
hidden agendas, interpersonal styles, ego needs,
interpersonal styles, ego - roughly 75
79
  • Dealing With Conflict
  • Two Primary Sources of Conflict
  • Avoidance of confronting and working through
    differences.
  • The need to be right.

80
Constructive Conflict
  • Value Disagreement Manage Conflict
  • Disagreement Comes from Sincere Involvement with
    a Problem
  • Final Agreement Better than Initial Suggestion
  • Open to Support of Different Opinions and Ideas
  • Focused on Issue--No Personal Attacks
  • Result Satisfies Whole Group

81
Dealing With Conflict
  • Enforce Ground Rules
  • Accept Differences
  • Accept Positive Aspects of Conflict
  • Find Common Ground
  • Promote Consensus
  • Clarify Roles
  • Set Goals

82
  • What do we need to do more of?
  • What do we need to do less of?

83
Four Action Framework
Reduce
Eliminate
Raise
Create
84
Characteristics of Action Plans
  • Assign responsibility for the successful
    completion of the Action Plan. Who is
    responsible? What are the roles and
    responsibilities?
  • Detail all required steps to achieve the Vision
    that the Action Plan is supporting. Where will
    the actions be taken?
  • Establish a time frame for the completion each
    steps. When will we need to take these actions?
  • Establish the resources required. How much will
    it take to execute these actions?
  • Define the expected results and milestones of the
    action plan.
  • What communication process will we follow?

85
Actions Overview
86
Appreciative Inquiry
  • If we took one tenth of the energy we invest in
    criticism and converted it to gratitude, our life
    would improve significantly.

87
Quick Wins
  • Focus of short-term targets
  • Weekly, monthly and quarterly targets for those
    responsible
  • Engineer Success-Experiences
  • Give feedback regarding progress

88
Activity
Teams Brainstorm
Teams Create Sticky Wall
Teams Report Ideas
Large Group Discussion
89
  • Comprehensive change strategy integrating
    worker, workplace and work.
  • Worker includes the network of social
    relationships and behavioral patterns of members,
    such as norms, roles and communications.
  • Workplace includes the formal design, policies,
    procedures, etc., and is set forth by the
    organization chart including division of work
    and patterns of authority.
  • Work includes the primary functions,
    activities, and operations including the
    techniques, equipment, etc., used to produce the
    output of the system.

90
System Model
Process
Define Value
The Continuous Improvement Process
Identify Opportunity/Problem
Work from Right to Left
91
To Successfully Deploy RapidLeanSixSigma (2)
  • Involve Everyone
  • Leadership,
  • Champion,
  • Lean Six Sigma Master,
  • Green Belt,
  • Empowered Employees

92
Initial Steps Might look like this. (1 of 2)
  • Generate executive leadership interest in
    transformation
  • Conduct Transformation Overview executive
    briefing
  • Decide to move forward with Transformation
    implementation
  • Conduct Transformation training to Centers of
    Influence
  • Select the first cluster of business for
    Transformation

93
Initial Steps Might look like this (2)
  • Identify training requirements
  • Conduct training
  • Make second assessment of implementation
  • Make decision to expand the initiative
  • Revise Transformation deployment Schedule
  • Integrate lessons learned into strategy

94
Key Elements
  • Goals are understood and committed to
  • A climate of trust is reached
  • Open and honest communication
  • Diversity of opinions and ideas are encouraged
  • Creativity and risk-taking is encouraged
  • Individuals are constantly learning and improving
  • Procedures are developed to diagnose, analyze,
    and solve problems
  • Collaborative leadership is practiced

95
Activity
  • What is the case for change?

96
  • Getting the Right Information,
  • in the Right Form,
  • to the Right People,
  • in the Right Context
  • Right Time --- Anywhere

97
  • Present information more than once.
  • Present the information verbally and again
  • in writing.
  • Allow individual(s) to ask questions.
  • Be clear and accurate.
  • Be patient.

98
For Discussion
  • A strong communication campaign has many
    elements, and they all need to be targeted
    messages.
  • Rule of three reach your target audiences three
    times through three different channels no
    sheep dip.
  • Be consistent and persistent in the message.
  • Build campaign based on building communication
    networks.
  • Need an ongoing feedback mechanism.
  • Win-over the major influencers early.
  • Avoid Shaken Baby Syndrome.

99
Communication CampaignInform, Connect, and
Engage
100
  •  
  • Embedding Lean Six Sigma throughout the
    organization requires effective, open
    communication.
  • Lean Six Sigma provides a new model for working
    and thinking.

Overview
101

Purpose
  • Connect, inform, and engage Leadership Team,
    First Line Leaders, Team Leaders and skeptical
    friends.
  • Increase communication effectiveness and
    efficiency.

102
Communication
Leadership Team
First Line Leaders
Team Leaders
103
Communication
  • Communication strategies are more effective when
    they are Active rather than a passive process
  • Two-way communication produces better results
    than
  • one-way communication
  • Participants gain more when they Share
    Responsibility for communication
  • Eliminate Fear

Two-way
Active
Fear
Shared Responsibility
104

Goals and Objectives
  • Clarify Pathway.
  • Why is Lean Six Sigma important?
  • Present and maintain a positive image of Lean Six
    Sigma as an opportunity.
  • Present timely, accurate, up-to-date information
    about transformation.

105

Strategies
  • Cascading information flow through team
    leaders.
  • e-Mails
  • Leadership letters
  • Individual letters
  • Voice Mails
  • Town Hall updates
  • Centers of Influence (COI) breakfasts/lunches/coff
    ee breaks
  • One-on-one coaching
  •     

106

Technology Driven
  • Intranet (Common Drive project updates)   
  • Newsgroups
  • Electronic newsletter
  • Links to related resources
  •     

107

Print
  • Provide input to newsletter.
  • Issue quick and continuous press releases for
    internal bulletin board use, with emphasis on
    news and stories from the field (instead of
    memos and reports).
  • Lean Six Sigma introduction signs posters
  •     

108

Overview
  • Present and maintain positive image.
  • Present timely, accurate, up-to-date information.
  • Increase employee knowledge.
  • Increase employee knowledge and awareness of
    current issues.
  • Clarify What it is? Why is it important? How
    does it work?

109
Thoughts
  1. A strong communication campaign has many
    elements, and they all need to be targeted
    messages.
  2. Rule of three reach your target audiences three
    times through three different channels no
    sheep dip.
  3. Be consistent and persistent in the message.
  4. Build campaign based on building collaborations.
  5. Need an ongoing feedback mechanism.
  6. Win-over the major influencers early.

110
What Issues
General
Detailed
Specific
Long Term
How
Near Term
Short Term
Executive Leadership
B
B
Who Stake Holder Groups
T
N
E
111
Model Balanced Score Card
112
Culture
Create an environment that inspires people to
work together, engages our employees in
continuous learning, and allows everyone to excel.
To achieve our vision, how must our organization
learn and improve?
To satisfy our customers, at which processes must
we excel?
Internal Processes
Financial
Develop and execute innovative processes which
allow us to exceed customer expectations.
Improve profit significantly year over year.
Customer
To achieve our vision, how must we look to our
customers?
Deliver best value s
When we succeed, how will we look to our
stakeholders?
113
Example Dash Board
114
Sanity Check . . .
  • Make sure everything is linked and connected for
    a tight end-to-end model for driving strategic
    execution.

115
Tracking System
116
Tracking System
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Coaching/ Training
Booster Month
Communication Campaign
Coaching
Promotion
Evaluation
Follow-up
Continuous Improvement
Training Master Plan
117
Two Sides
  • The HARD Side
  • is about
  • processes
  • measurement
  • tools
  • structures
  • procedures
  • The SOFT Side
  • is about
  • buy-in
  • commitment
  • attitude
  • overcoming resistance to change
  • self-leadership

118
Culture
  • RapidLeanSixSigma
  • Participative
  • Encourage change
  • Job security
  • Continuous improvement
  • Policies that inspire people to
  • want continuous improvement
  • Work with supplier
  • Close to customers
  • Everyone trained in basic tools
  • Traditional
  • Authoritarian
  • No risk-taking
  • Fear of job loss
  • Status quo
  • Systems policies
  • Beat on supplier
  • Distant from customers
  • Few people trained in basic tools

119
Example Anchor to Culture
  • Customer Satisfaction
  • Pride in Continuous Improvement
  • Teamwork
  • Empowerment
  • Employee Engagement
  • Communication

120
Parking Lot
121
Quality Improvement Story
  • Select Process for Improvement based on
  • SCCs plans and priorities.
  • Set a target for improvement (objective
    statement)
  • Describe Process Flow With Flow Chart
  • Analyze flow chart for ways to streamline process
  • Brainstorm Cause and Effect Analysis
  • Collect Baseline Process Information using tools
  • such as checksheets, Pareto charts, histograms,
    etc.
  • Focus on the root cause
  • Imagineering of ideal process
  • Benchmarking
  • Take Actions that correct root cause
  • Use baseline before and after the improvement
    effort

Identify Improvement Opportunity
Define Measure Analyze Improve Control
Gather Data
Determine What Changes Would Help
Select and Implement a Change
Did it Work?
No
Yes
Make Permanent
122
  • Activity
  • Pathway to Profitability

123
Model Pathway to Profitability
Profitability
Best Quality - Lowest Cost - Most Responsive by
Continuous and Relentless Elimination of Waste
Talented , Diverse, High Performing Team
124

Where do we want to be 10, 11 and 2012?
  • Analyze the Gap
  • State Tasks
  • Prioritize Tasks

Where are we today
125
Path to ProfitabilityOne Possibility Price
Increase
Price
Bigger Profit
Some Profit
Cost
Cost Profit Price
126
Path to ProfitabilitySecond Possibility Reduce
Costs
Price
Some Profit
Bigger Profit
Cost
Price - Cost Profit
127
Path to Profitability Making It Happen
Reducing Costs
2012
2010
2011
About PowerShow.com