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Department of Emergency Management and Homeland Security

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Title: Department of Emergency Management and Homeland Security


1
Department of Emergency Management and Homeland
Security
  • 25 Sigourney Street
  • Hartford, Connecticut 06106-5042
  • 860-256-0800 (Main Number)
  • 860-256-0815 (Fax Number)

2
  • National Preparedness
  • Goals and Priorities
  • Commissioner James M. Thomas

3
  • Homeland Security Presidential Directive 8
  • Calls for an all-hazards National Preparedness
    Goal that
  • Establishes measurable priorities and targets a
    common approach to developing needed
    capabilities.

4
  • National Preparedness Goal
  • To engage Federal, State, Local and Tribal
    entities, their private and non-governmental
    partners, and the general public to achieve and
    sustain risk-based target levels of capability to
    prevent, protect against, respond to and recover
    from major events in order to minimize the impact
    on lives, property, and the economy.

5
  • VISION
  • A national preparedness system in which all
    entities have target capabilities in place, and
    effectively communicate and coordinate
    resources.
  • To balance the potential of major events with the
    requisite resources to prevent, respond to, and
    recover.

6
  • Priorities Developed by
  • Review of National Strategies
  • Presidential Directives
  • DHS Agency Objectives and Priorities
  • State Homeland Security Strategies

7
  • Two Types of Priorities
  • Overarching Priorities
  • Contribute to development of multiple
    capabilities
  • Capability Specific Priorities
  • Build upon selected capabilities from the Target
    Capabilities List for which the nation has the
    greatest need

8
  • 1. Implement
  • - National Incident Management System (NIMS)
  • - National Response Plan (NRP)

9
  • 2. Expand Upon Regional Collaboration
  • Strengthen regionally-based preparedness by
    focus our finite resources on expanded regional
    collaboration center on urban areas with the
    great density of population, critical
    infrastructure, and other significant factors.

10
  • 3. Implement the Interim National
    Infrastructure Protection Plan
  • Strengthen capabilities to protect high traffic
    borders, ports, public transit systems and other
    high priority critical infrastructure outside the
    areas of expanded regional collaboration centered
    on urban areas.

11
  • 4. Strengthen Information Sharing and
    Collaboration Capabilities
  • Establishing prevention frameworks based upon
    regional collaboration that are linked in a
    national network will facilitate efforts to
    achieve information sharing and collaboration

12
  • 5. Strengthen Interoperable Communications
    Capabilities
  • Achieve interoperability not only in terms of
    communications, but also in the broad ability of
    systems and organizations to provide service and
    to accept service from one another across
    jurisdiction lines and enabling them to operate
    effectively together.

13
  • 6. Strengthen
  • Chemical
  • Biological
  • Radiological
  • Nuclear
  • Explosive Detection
  • Response and Decontamination Capabilities
  • Abilities to prevent and deter against acts of
    terrorism

14
  • 7. Strengthen Medical Surge and Mass
    Prophylaxis Capabilities
  • Establish emergency-ready public health
    and healthcare entities across the Nation.

15
Homeland Security Strategy
  • Ret. Major John Leonard

16
A Brief History
  • 2001 Domestic Preparedness Strategy developed
    by OEM under the direction of the Weapons of Mass
    Destruction Task Force
  • 11 Goals, 43 Objectives
  • 2003 Homeland Security Strategy revised by DHS
    to reflect work that needed to be continued as
    well as additional Goals/Objectives reviewed and
    approved by the State Working Group and the
    Senior Steering Committee
  • 9 Goals, 61 Objectives

17
Current Task
  • Up-date Strategy to place preparedness efforts in
    context of new Federal doctrine
  • National Preparedness Goal
  • Seven National Priorities
  • Citizen preparedness and volunteer efforts
  • Local government concerns regional
    collaboration
  • Identify any additional capabilities from the
    Target Capabilities List that are a priority

18
Process
  • Eliminate Objectives that have been accomplished
    or are unnecessary
  • Modify language (e.g. terrorism incident)
  • Create timeframes for Objectives
  • Draft new Goals/Objectives
  • Review/modify Implementation Steps
  • Align Strategy with the new DEMHS
  • Link to National Priorities
  • Reviewed and approved by Coordinating Council on
    9/8/05

19
Connecticut Homeland Security Goals
  • GOAL 1 Improve the abilities of emergency
    responders to identify and respond to an all
    hazards incident, man-made or natural.
  • GOAL 2 Develop a comprehensive CBRNE incident
    response and contingency plan.

  • GOAL 3 Improve critical incident management and
    response through the implementation and use of
    the National Incident Management System (NIMS).
  • GOAL 4 Maximize utilization of all available
    funding through coordinated leveraging, pooling,
    and disbursement of budgetary resources.
  • GOAL 5 Enhance the existing statewide
    communications systems.

20
Connecticut Homeland Security Goals
  • GOAL 6 Enhance public safety through hardening
    of critical infrastructure sectors.
  • GOAL 7 Develop a self-sustaining training
    program for all hazard preparedness.
  • GOAL 8 Enhance capabilities to conduct
    proactive interdictions and investigations to
    prevent and mitigate terrorism incidents.
  • GOAL 9 Develop a comprehensive all hazard
    recovery plan.
  • GOAL 10 Engage the general public, educational
    systems and private sector in all hazard
    prevention, planning, response and recovery.

21
Conclusion
  • Allowed the State to review, refine and update
    its Strategy
  • Recognizes progress made sustains efforts
    acknowledges new initiatives
  • Aligned the Strategy with the seven National
    Priorities
  • Provides a common reference for ODP
  • Provides statewide guidance, while allowing local
    discretion to pursue projects that meet specific
    needs

22

Interoperable Communications Michael Varney
23
Interoperable Communication Goals
  • Priority 1 - Reliable Agency Specific Voice
    Communications
  • Priority 2 - Interoperable Voice Communications
  • Interagency Police-Interagency
    Fire-Interagency EMS
  • Interdisciplinary Police/Fire/EMS/Other
  • Priority 3 - Operable Interoperable Data
    Communications
  • Agency Specific Integrated Justice/Public
    Safety

24
Public safety Communications Interoperability
Committee
  • Created spring 2002
  • Committee meetings held monthly.
  • Membership

Local Departments Organizations State Organizations Federal and Other partners
CT Fire Chiefs Assoc. CT Assoc. of Police Chiefs CCM Public safety Answering Points CMED centers Regional dispatch Centers Local Fire Departments Local Police Departments Local Emergency Management Transportation Public Safety Information Technology Emergency Management and Homeland Security Military Department Public Health Motor Vehicles Corrections Environmental Protection Policy and Management CT Urban Search Rescue USCG Homeland Security Urban Area Security Initiative New Haven Interoperable Communications Technical Assistance Program
25
Public Safety Land Mobile Radio Spectrum Bands

450-470
764-776 806-824 4940
MHz 25-50 150-174
220-222 470-512 794-806 851-869
4990
Requires TV Clearing
4.9 GHz
in most urban areas
New Public Safety
(TV Channels 60-69)
Broadband Spectrum
26
Interoperability Continuum
27
Committee Activity
  • ICALL / ITAC System
  • STOCS System
  • STATE TACTICAL ON SCENE CHANNEL SYSTEM
  • Grant Guidance and Review
  • Educational Programs
  • Tactical Interoperable Communications Plan

28
ICALL / ITAC
  • 800 MHz Command and Control System
  • Statewide tower repeater system (40)
  • Mobile decon trailer repeater/towers (20)
  • Portable radios issued to all local Fire, Police,
    Emergency Management and EMS heads
  • Base stations at all PSAPs, CMEDs and Dispatch
    Centers
  • State response agencies equipped
  • Repair system in place and radio cache available

29
STOCS Statewide Tactical On Scene
Communications System
  • Interoperable Radio System for on scene tactical
    use, using existing portable radio equipment
  • VHF,UHF, 800 MHz combined into five
    interoperability channel groups
  • If needed using a Cross Band Repeater Unit. Units
    will be provided by Interoperability Committee to
    municipalities using DHS funds.

30
Grant Guidance and Review
  • Technical review of interoperable grant requests
    ensure interoperable equipment and program
  • Assistance with related grant projects (COPS,
    DOT, Fire Act, etc.)
  • Currently writing RFP to create master contracts
    to expedite and ease procurement

31
Educational Programs
  • ICALL / ITAC program deliveries
  • Special program deliveries
  • Interoperable Communications in CT fall 2005
  • Communication Unit Leader training spring 2006
  • Drills and Exercises

32
Tactical Interoperable Communications Plan
  • Objective is to achieve adequate communication
    within an hour of an incident
  • Project will include governance, equipment
    inventories, plan development and training,
    tested by progressive exercises.
  • Southwest Connecticut (Norwalk) is initial site,
    program to be replicated throughout CT five
    regions
  • FY 2005 Requirement, due May 1 2006, tested by
    May 2007

33
LOCAL SPENDING PLANS Deputy CommissionerWayne
E. Sandford
34
Goals
  • Equip First Responders
  • Police, Fire, EMS, Public Works, Health
  • Training First responders
  • National Incident Management System
  • Exercising Emergency Plans
  • Local Emergency Plan
  • Regional Emergency Plan

35
Secondary Goals
  • Purchase equipment that can be used everyday and
    that would be used for homeland security.
  • Consider equipment rotation schedule to replace
    supplies with a shelf life.

36
Protective Clothing
  • Consider replacing personnel protective equipment
    (5 yr shelf life)
  • Purchase replacement respirator filters
  • Personnel Dosimeters

37
Communications
  • Base Stations
  • Mobile radios
  • Portable radios
  • Support equipment
  • Batteries, Mounting equipment
  • Radio towers

38
Police
  • Crowd control
  • Mobile data Terminals
  • Finger print machine (AFIS)
  • Traffic control
  • Surveillance equipment
  • Equipment trailers

39
Fire
  • Breathing Apparatus
  • New and upgrades
  • Mobile Data Terminals
  • Equipment Trailers
  • Lighting
  • Generators, lights, cords
  • Decontamination supplies
  • Wash booths, pumps
  • Personnel Accountability Systems

40
EMS
  • Disposable Backboards
  • Splints
  • Oxygen manifolds, bottles
  • Equipment trailers
  • Generators, Lighting

41
Decontamination
  • Needed supplies
  • Tarps, brushes, etc
  • Decon tents
  • Garments
  • Lighting equipment
  • Barriers (crowd control)
  • PPE for decon team

42
Public Works
  • Traffic signs
  • Traffic barriers
  • Protective clothing

43
Emergency Management
  • Emergency Operations Center
  • Telephones, Radios, Computers
  • Fixed Generators
  • Generators
  • Management
  • Computers, software, printers, etc.
  • Emergency notification systems
  • Reverse 911

44
FY 2003 STATE HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT
PROGRAM Rosemary Salerno
45
PART 1 FUNDING Award Date May 1, 2003
PART 2 FUNDING Award Date June 19, 2003
Category Allotment
Equipment 5,800,000
Exercise 1,450,000
Training 435,000
Administration 580,000
Total Grant Award 8,265,000
Category Allotment
First Responder 18,974,000
Critical Infrastructure Reimbursement 2,919,000
Total Grant Award 21,893,000
46
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Discipline Level Total PPE
HazMat A 76
Fire B 10,078
Police C 5,617
EMS C 4,319
Total Outfitted Total Outfitted 20,090
47
Interoperability
  • 300 - ICALL/ITAC Mobile Radios
    and batteries
  • 140 Mobile Stations for primary and secondary
    PSAPS
  • ICALL/ITAC Tower Enhancements

48
Decontamination
  • 12 Trailers
  • 34 Prime Movers
  • Modesty Garments

49
Chemical, Biological, or Radiological Detection
Equipment
Basic Meter Package HazMat Meter Package
MiniRae 2000 PID M256A Trainer
Scout Multi Gas Meter Draeger CMS Chip Meter
Ludlum Model 3 Draeger Tube System
SAIC Dosimeter APD 2000
50
Regional/ State Response Teams
  • Hartford Bomb Squad
  • New Haven Bomb Squad
  • Stamford Bomb Squad
  • Haz Mat Teams
  • CSP Emergency Services
  • DEP Haz Mat
  • 2 Bomb Trucks Fiber optic
    Imagining
  • 2 Bomb Robots Metering Packages
  • Bomb Suits and Helmets Imagining Machines
  • Imagining Machines Detection Equipment

51
Urban Search Rescue Team CT TF 1
  • Search
  • (Law Enforcement)
  • Rescue
  • Planning
  • Logistics
  • Medical
  • HAZMAT

52
Pending Equipment Purchases
  • Pharmaceuticals for Acute Care Hospitals
  • Mark 1 Kits
  • Mobile Command Vehicles
  • Mass Casualty Trailers
  • Mass Evacuation Trailers
  • Security System for Brainard Facility Training
    Academy
  • Interoperability Equipment for Civil Air Patrol

53
FY2004 and FY2005 Homeland Security Grant Program
  • Elizabeth Graham

54
FY2004 FY2005
State Homeland Security 24,447,994 15,491,247
Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention 7,255,000 5,633,182
Citizen Corps 508,000 196,661
Urban Area Security Initiative 10,376,126 0
Emergency Management Performance 2,559,579 2,531,746
Metropolitan Medical Response System 400,000 227,592
TOTAL 45,546,699 24,080,428
55
  • As of Sept. 19, 2005
  • 145 municipalities participating in the HS, LETPP
    and CCP program
  • Half of set-aside projects are operating,
    remainder in development
  • Processed all requests received totaling 5.2M

56
State-Administered HS, LETPP and CCP Projects
  • Issued revised Request Package on 9/14/05
  • Replaced cumbersome equipment request form with
    list
  • Eliminated quarterly due date, requests will be
    processed upon receipt
  • Request Package on the web at www.ct.gov/demhs
    under Grants
  • In development, a process to document receipt of
    goods to facilitate vendor payments

57
Self-Administered HS, LETPP and CCP Projects
(Grantees)
  • Grant template finalized
  • Grant production in progress
  • Reimbursement process established and in use

58
Reporting Compliance
  • All grant materials (request package,
    reimbursement form, etc.) have been designed to
    facilitate reporting to the federal government
  • We want to thank you in advance for filling these
    out completely

59
Partnerships to Facilitate Procurement
  • DEMHS has established partnerships with DAS, DOIT
    and select RPOs to facilitate the procurement
    process
  • DAS and DEMHS are working together to
  • Gain access to GSA contracts
  • Expand DEMHS purchasing authority under C.G.S.
    4a-53
  • Enhance communications
  • Provide training opportunities for municipalities

60
  • DEMHS and DOIT are working together to
  • Enhance communications
  • Expedite procurement including establishing a
    master contract for interoperable
    communications (radios).
  • Purchase of radios currently on state contract
    can go forward. Other radios will be purchased
    under the master contract.

61
  • DEMHS and RPOs are working together to
  • Develop specifications for emergency notification
    systems (equipment hardware)
  • Upon completion, DEMHS and DOIT will complete the
    RFP process

62
Conclusion
  • DEMHS is continuing to build capacity to respond
    to municipal and statewide needs
  • As we look toward future grant funding, DEMHS
    will offer funding models that allow more local
    control over grant resources (cash advance grants)

63
DEMHS Strategic Planning Grant Administration
Staff
  • Libby Graham 860-256-0910
  • Deanna Chaparro 860-256-0912
  • Jack Leonard 860-256-0913
  • Gary Pescosolido 860-256-0911
  • Ken Rigney 860-256-0920
  • Lee Toffey 860-256-0916
  • Rich Zaccagnino 860-256-0914

64
  • Training
  • PASS THE WORD
  • Paul Benyeda

65
  • ODP Training Catalogs available on
    www.ct.gov/demhs
  • All training listed on DEMHS web site is approved
    for reimbursement
  • On line registration for classes

66
  • ODP classes available to municipalities requires
    minimum attendance
  • FEMA/EMI State classes available to
    municipalities
  • Exercises

67
  • Buffer Zone Protection Plan
  • Detective Eric Dency

68
BUFFER ZONE PROTECTION PLAN
  • The buffer zone is the area outside of a critical
    infrastructure key resource facilities that can
    be utilized by criminals to conduct surveillance
    or launch an attack.
  • 17 facilities throughout Connecticut have been
    selected by DHS for FY05 as Buffer Zone sites.
  • Sites were chosen by DHS after review of
    National, State and local critical infrastructure
    key resource lists.

69
Critical Infrastructure
  • Systems and assets so vital to the United
    States that the incapacity or destruction of such
    would have a debilitating impact on security,
    national economic security, national public
    health or safety or any combination of those
    matters.
  • USA PATRIOT Act of 2001
  • Agriculture and Food
  • Water
  • Public Health
  • Emergency Services
  • Defense Industrial Base
  • Telecommunications
  • National Monuments and Icons
  • Energy
  • Transportation
  • Banking and Finance
  • Chemical and Hazardous Materials
  • Postal and Shipping
  • Information Technology

70
Key Resources
  • Publicly or privately controlled resources
    essential to the minimal operations of the
    economy and government.
  • Nuclear Power Plants
  • Dams
  • Government Facilities
  • Commercial Assets

71
BUFFER ZONE PLAN PURPOSE
  • Enhance local Law Enforcement first responders
    equipment, staffing, and training capabilities
    and provide resources to enhance their ability to
    prevent terrorist attacks.
  • Define a supplemental security area outside the
    security perimeter of a Critical Infrastructure.
  • Identify and document specific threats and
    vulnerabilities associated with the facility and
    surrounding area.
  • Analyze and categorize the level of risk
    associated with each vulnerability.
  • Recommend scalable protective measures.
  • Strengthen partnerships among federal, state,
    local, territorial, and tribal governments and
    CI/KR owners and operators.

72
Defining the Buffer Zone
Surveillance Points
Primary Access / Egress Route
ABC CHEMICAL CO. (CI/KR SITE)
Potential Attack Points
Surveillance Points
73
Applicants and Funding
  • DHS Protective Security Division and ODP
    partnering to manage the program.
  • Up to 50,000 per site available to procure
    equipment to better protect the facility/first
    responders.
  • Only the State Administrative Agency (DEMHS) is
    eligible to apply.
  • The SAA obligates funds to responsible
    jurisdictions with authority over and around
    identified sites.
  • Local jurisdictions with authority over the
    identified sites are the FY05 BZPP sub grantee.
  • 850,000 awarded to State.
  • 3 State Administrative portion.
  • 2.5 Local administrative portion. (1,212.50)
  • Minimum amount distributed per site is 47,287.50
  • Equipment on ODPs AEL authorized for procurement

74
Connecticut's Response
  • To date all 17 buffer zone plans were submitted
    to DHS for approval June 01, 2005 .
  • Eight plans have been approved and nine are
    currently being reviewed by DHS.
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