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Project Management Certificate Program Introduction to Project Management

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Project Management Certificate Program Introduction to Project Management Module 1 * – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Project Management Certificate Program Introduction to Project Management


1
Project Management Certificate Program
Introduction to ProjectManagement
  • Module 1

2
Module Objectives
  • By module end, you will be able to
  • Understand how the course is organized
  • Understand basic definitions
  • Understand the role of the project manager
  • Understand how processes shown in the PMBOK Guide
    are used to manage projects

3
Ultimate Practical Project Management Guide
  • The workbook is arranged to provide information
    in smaller segments. In each module there are
    generally
  • An opening list of objectives
  • An overview of the information and list of
    processes used
  • Process sections begin with a PMBOK Guide locator
    showing in what Knowledge Area and Process Group
    the process fits in

4
Ultimate Practical Project Management Guide
(continued)
  • The workbook is arranged to provide information
    in smaller segments. In each module there are
    generally
  • Process elements Inputs, Tools Techniques,
    Outputs
  • Documents and templates
  • Must Know Concepts
  • Process Quizzes and Lesson Quizzes

5
UPPM Methodology
  • The Ultimate Practical Project Management Guide
    is intended to show a practical method to use the
    42 PMBOK Guide processes. In addition
  • There are 5 additional processes inferred from
    best project management practices.

6
UPPM Methodology (continued)
  • In addition
  • The UPPM Guide depicts the 42 PMBOK processes in
    7 steps for practical project management
  • The UPPM Methodology is depicted in a reference
    poster
  • This methodology is highly customizable to meets
    specifics needs

7
(No Transcript)
8
How the PMBOK Guide Applies Processes
  • The processes depicted in the PMBOK Guide are
    generally recognized as good practices for
    project management.
  • An ANSI Standard
  • Process application is based on project need
  • The processes create a framework for project
    management

9
What is a Project?
  • Projects have three main characteristics
  • Temporary
  • Unique
  • Progressively elaborated

10
Progressive Elaboration
  • Progressive elaboration progressively details
    the elements of a project. It can be compared to
    the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle as defined by Deming.

11
What is Project Management?
  • Project Management is the application of
    knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to
    project activities in order to meet project
    requirements.

12
Project Management is also
  • Managing project constraints

13
Project Management Success
  • Many organizations are adopting a wider view of
    project success to include
  • Provide Value
  • Ensure Quality
  • Satisfy Requirements
  • Meet Budget
  • Meet Schedule
  • Minimize Risk
  • Satisfy Stakeholders
  • Satisfy Team

14
Required Knowledge
  • The project manager must possess a wide range of
    knowledge in order to be successful. Some areas
    of knowledge that facilitate success include
  • Project Management and General Management
  • Ability to perform
  • Personal Skills

15
Project Management Knowledge
  • The project manager should know
  • Project Management in general
  • The Standard for Project Management (as depicted
    in the PMBOK Guide)
  • Specific project management knowledge and
    methodologies required for the industry or
    organization that the PM is working in

16
General Management Knowledge
  • The project manager should have knowledge of
    areas, such as
  • Finance
  • Strategic Planning
  • Organizing
  • Human Resource Administration

17
Ability to Perform
  • The project managers ability to perform is based
    on
  • Specialized application knowledge
  • Knowledge of best practices
  • Other knowledge areas and interpersonal skills

18
Interpersonal Skills
  • The project manager must be able to manage people
    effectively using interpersonal skills such as
  • Leadership
  • Team building
  • Motivation
  • Communication
  • Influencing
  • Decision Making
  • Political and cultural awareness
  • Negotiation

19
Projects, Programs and Portfolios
  • Projects, Programs and Portfolios interact to
    manage the overall resource use and work
    performance in the organization. In general
  • The Strategic vision of the organization creates
    the portfolio. Portfolios contain programs,
    project and other work.
  • Programs are created to deliver benefits to the
    organization. Programs are multiple projects
    managed in a unified manner.
  • Projects are authorized to deliver specific
    deliverables.

20
Project Life Cycle
  • Project Life Cycles are defined by the performing
    organization to meet the organizations need
  • The Project Life Cycle (PLC) defines
  • What phases will be performed
  • What work is done in each phase
  • Roles and organizations involved
  • Many times the PLC is defined by a Project
    Management Office

21
Product Life Cycle
  • The product life cycle is unique to each product
    and specialized application area. Product life
    cycles can often consist of several unique
    projects and periods of operation. A product
    life cycle might consist of
  • Creation Project (6 months)
  • Period of Operation (18 months)
  • Update Project (3 months)
  • Period of Operation (36 months)
  • Closing Project (3 months)

22
Project Phases
  • A phase creates one or more deliverables and ends
    with a review
  • Reviews are often termed stage gates, phase
    exits or kill points
  • Phases are generally named for the type of work
    being performed
  • Phases can be sequential or overlapping

23
Stakeholders
  • A project stakeholder is anyone participating in
    the project, or anyone whose interests may be
    affected by the project and project outcomes.
  • Stakeholders can be internal or external
  • We will discuss this concept further in the
    process of Identify Stakeholders

24
The PMBOK Guide Fourth Edition
  • Released at the end of 2008
  • Provides a common vocabulary and understanding
    about project management
  • Section I Project Management Framework
  • Section II The Standard for Project Management
  • Section III Project Management Knowledge Areas

25
Project Processes
  • A process is a series of actions bringing about a
    pre-determined result
  • The pre-defined results are the outputs from the
    processes
  • Project management processes inject logical
    progression and order to project management

26
Project Process Groups
  • A process group is a group of processes that
    create similar actions that are grouped together
  • As an example, there are 20 processes that make
    up the Planning process group
  • Most of the processes are titled to indicate the
    type of action that is taken i.e., Plan Schedule
    to indicate that this is a planning action

27
How the PMI Structure Fits
  • In a typical Project Life Cycle, the PMI defined
    structure of Process Groups and Processes fit in
    the middle of existing elements. In an outline
    form
  • The Project Life Cycle (defined by Enterprise)
  • Phases (defined by Enterprise)
  • Processes (PMI Standard)
  • Inputs
  • Tools and Techniques
  • Outputs
  • Activities (Specialized Application)

28
Process Group Interaction
  • All process groups have a high degree of overlap.
    This means that processes that are treated as
    being unique and distinct, will in fact, occur
    simultaneously

29
Project Management Knowledge Areas
  • A knowledge area is a group of processes that
    are grouped together by their knowledge
    requirements
  • Example, there are 6 processes in Project Time
    Management. All 6 processes deal with the
    activity and schedule elements of the project
  • There are 9 Knowledge Areas
  • Refer to page 43 of the PMBOK Fourth Edition for
    details

30
Must Know Concepts
31
Social Styles
32
Social Style Grid(Score Card)
A I I I I I 1 I
B I 2 I I I I I
C I I I I I 3 I I I I I
D 4 I
Majority Letter____ Majority Number____
33
Exercise Social Style Score Card
A 1
B 2
C 3
D 4
Majority Letter____ Majority Number____
34
Social Style EvaluatorThe Versatile Salesperson,
Roger Wenschlag, Wilson Learning Company
  • Cooperative lt- -gt Competitive
  • D C B A
  • Introverted lt- -gt Extroverted
  • D C B A
  • Slow, studied lt- -gt Fast-paced
  • D C B A
  • Unassertive lt- -gt Assertive
  • D C B A
  • Indecisive lt- -gt Decisive
  • D C B A

35
Social Style EvaluatorThe Versatile Salesperson,
Roger Wenschlag, Wilson Learning Company
  • Cool lt- -gt Warm
  • 1 2 3 4
  • Calm lt- -gt Excitable
  • 1 2 3 4
  • Reserved lt- -gt Open
  • 1 2 3 4
  • Task-oriented lt- -gt People-oriented
  • 1 2 3 4
  • Poker-faced lt- -gt Animated
  • 1 2 3 4

36
Social Style EvaluatorThe Versatile Salesperson,
Roger Wenschlag, Wilson Learning Company
  • Aloof lt- -gt Intimate
  • 1 2 3 4
  • Inward lt- -gt Outgoing
  • 1 2 3 4
  • Controlledlt- -gt Emotional
  • 1 2 3 4
  • Hard to read lt- -gt Easy to read
  • 1 2 3 4
  • Unresponsive lt- -gt Responsive
  • 1 2 3 4

37
Be Versatile With Everyone
  • 4 Main Behavioral/Social Styles
  • Driver
  • Expressive
  • Analytical
  • Amiable
  • Variable Assertiveness
  • Attribute Ask or tell?
  • Variable Responsiveness
  • Attribute Control or emote?

Ask
Tell
Control
Emote
Source The Versatile Salesperson, Roger
Wenschlag, Wilson Learning Company
38
Be Versatile With Everyone The Versatile
Salesperson, Roger Wenschlag, Wilson Learning
Company!
  • Driver (tell/control)
  • Big picture
  • Bottom line, time sensitive
  • Expressive
  • (tell/emote)
  • Big picture, creative, time sensitive
  • Relationships

Ask
Tell
Control
Emote
39
Be Versatile With Everyone The Versatile
Salesperson, Roger Wenschlag, Wilson Learning
Company!
  • Analytical (ask/control)
  • Whole picture
  • Processes,structures
  • Amiable (ask/emote)
  • Details, supportive
  • Team-oriented, relationships

Ask
Tell
Control
Emote
40
Styles Within Styles
D-1
C-1
B-1
A-1
Driver- Analytical
Driver- Driver
Analytical- Driver
Analytical- Analytical
Driver
Analytical
D-2
C-2
B-2
A-2
Driver- Amiable
Driver- Expressive
Analytical- Expressive
Analytical- Amiable
A-3
B-3
C-3
D-3
Amiable- Driver
Expressive- Analytical
Expressive- Driver
Amiable- Analytical
Amiable
Expressive
A-4
B-4
C-4
D-4
Amiable- Amiable
Amiable- Expressive
Expressive- Amiable
Expressive- Expressive
41
Exercise
  • The instructor?__________________
  • At the golf course?
  • Driver
  • Expressive
  • Analytical
  • Amiable
  • Getting into an elevator?
  • Driver
  • Expressive
  • Analytical
  • Amiable
  • Hanging wallpaper?
  • Driver
  • Expressive
  • Analytical
  • Amiable

42
So, What Should I Do?
Ask
Tell
Control
  • Emote a little more often
  • Control a little less
  • Verbalize your feelings
  • Give personal compliments
  • Engage in more small talk
  • Lighten up a little

Emote
43
So, What Should I Do?
  • Control a little more often
  • Emote a little less often
  • Talk less
  • Restrain some enthusiasm
  • Make more decisions based on facts

Ask
Tell
Emote
44
So, What Should I Do?
  • Ask a little more often
  • Tell a little less often
  • Ask for opinions
  • Negotiate decisions
  • Listen effectively
  • Adapt to time needs of others
  • Help others lead

Tell
Ask
Control
Emote
45
So, What Should I Do?
  • Tell a little more often
  • Ask a little less often
  • Get to the point
  • Volunteer information
  • Be willing to disagree
  • Act on your convictions
  • Initiate conversation

Ask
Tell
Control
Emote
46
Exercise
  • What social styles do you work best with?
  • What social styles do you not work well with?
  • The major area I need to be more flexible in is
  • Being less tell-assertive
  • Being more tell-assertive
  • Being less emote responsive
  • Being more emote responsive

47
Working With Drivers
  • Stick to business
  • Be specific, brief, and to the point
  • Use your time together efficiently
  • Come prepared will all requirements, objectives,
    supporting documents in a well-organized
    package
  • Present the facts logically plan your
    presentation efficiently, but not too much detail
  • Ask specific (preferably, What?) questions
  • Provide alternatives for making decisions
  • Provide facts and figures about the probability
    of success or effectiveness of options
  • If you disagree, take issue with facts, not them
  • If you agree, support results.
  • Motivate and persuade by referring to objectives
    and results
  • Support, and maintain their position
  • After talking business, depart graciously

48
Working With Expressives
  • Plan interaction that supports their dreams and
    intuitions
  • Use enough time to be stimulating, fun-loving,
    fast-moving, and entertaining
  • Leave time for relating and socializing
  • Talk about people and their goals, and people
    whose opinions are also stimulating
  • Dont deal with details put them in writing pin
    them to modes of action
  • Ask for their opinions/ideas regarding people
  • Provide ideas for implementation/action
  • Provide testimonials from people they respect
  • Offer special, immediate and extra incentives for
    their willingness to take risks

49
Working With Amiables
  • Start (briefly) with a personal comment
  • Break the ice
  • Use your time to be agreeable
  • Show sincere interest in them find areas of
    common involvement be candid and open
  • Patiently draw out their personal goals and work
    with them to help them achieve them
  • Listen and be responsive
  • Ask, How? questions to draw out their opinions
  • If you both agree easily, try to determine areas
    of possible disagreement(remember, they may not
    tell you)
  • If you do disagree, look for hurt
    feelings/personal reasons
  • Move casually and informally
  • Define clearly (preferably in writing) their
    individual contribution
  • Show benefits, and how decisions will reflect the
    minimization of risks Provide personal
    assurances, clear specific solutions, with
    maximum assurances/guarantees

50
Working With Analyticals
  • Prepare your case in advance
  • Use time wisely and be accurate
  • Approach them in a straight-forward, direct way
  • Stick to business
  • Support their principles and thoughtful
    approaches/insight--build your credibility by
    listing the pros and cons to any suggestions you
    make
  • Make an organized contribution to their efforts
  • Present specifics and do what you say you will do
  • Take your time, but be persistent
  • Draw up a scheduled approach to implementing
    action with a step-by-step timetable
  • Assure them that there wont be any surprises
  • If you agree, follow through - if you disagree,
    make an organized presentation reflecting your
    case
  • Draw them out if you believe they are
    uncomfortable with the decision Give them time
    to verify the reliability/accuracy of your
    actions
  • Be accurate and realistic
  • Provide solid, tangible, and practical evidence
  • Indicate guarantees over a long period, but
    provide options too
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