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Title: June 2005


1
Improved School Milk Test Final Report
  • June 2005

2
Acknowledgements
  • Special thanks are due to many people whose
    dedication and continued commitment made this
    test a strong success. The core project team
    included
  • Prairie Farms Dairy St. Louis District
    Dairy Council Blueridge Paper Products
  • Mr. Roger Capps Ms. Rita Duncan Mr. Bobby Rogers
  • Mr. Ed Mullins Mr. Gary Elliott
  • Mr. Matt McClelland MilkPEP Mr. John Latham
  • Ms. Rebecca Leinenbach Mr. Tom Nagle Ms. Pam
    Parris
  • Mr. Rich Winkler Mr. Victor Zaborsky
  • Prime Consulting Group
  • Continental Custom Ingredients Tru
    Manufacturing Mr. Doug Adams
  • Mr. Travis McMahan Session Fixture Co Mr. John
    Pryslak
  • Mr. Shawn Marquis
  • This test was made possible through the funding
    support of MilkPEP and four leading paperboard
    packaging companies. MilkPEP extends a special
    Thank You to these companies for their
    partnership in this project.
  • Blueridge Paper Co. Mr. Bobby Rogers
  • International Paper Co. Mr. Robert Anstine
  • TetraPak Mr. Ted Thomas
  • Elopak Ms. Anita Kaminski

3
Table of Contents
  • Background
  • Executive Summary
  • Objective, Scope Measurement
  • Key Learnings
  • Appendix

4
Background Why was the test conducted?
  • This test was developed and conducted to address
    numerous questions from MilkPEP processor
    members, packaging companies and schools, about
    ways to improve school milk sales and
    consumption.
  • How important are flavors, and do the number of
    flavors effect sales?
  • Will improving the Chocolate formula, to be
    comparable to retail, increase consumption?
  • The sales increases found in earlier tests have
    been attributed to the change to plastic
    packaging. Will an improved carton also deliver
    sales increases?
  • What impact does sampling have on flavored milk
    sales?
  • Do traditional means of marketing impact milk
    sales in schools?
  • Posters ? Giveaways/Contests
  • Sampling ? Encouragement by adults
  • If increases occur, are they worth the effort and
    cost? Can schools achieve a financial gain
    (payout) from efforts to improve students milk
    consumption?

5
Executive Summary Milk Sales Grew 12.2
Change in Average Weekly Units per Student Test
vs. Fall 2004
Control
No Change (-0.1)
Flexo 3 Flavors
13.0
Flexo 4 Flavors
12.2
13.5
Litho 4 Flavors
11.5
6
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Strong Results Were Widespread
Troy
Orchard Farms
  • ? ? ?
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? ? ? ? ? ?
Unit Sales Change
St. Charles
Hazelwood
Decline
0-4.9
Wentzville
5.0-9.9
Riverview Gardens
Ferguson Florissant
10
Pattonville
JN
? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
RI
NO
Francis Howell
W
Parkway
St. Louis City
Ladue
CL
B
MR
AF Affton B Brentwood BA Bayless CL
Clayton HP Hancock Place JN Jennings MR
Maplewood-Richmond NO Normandy RI Ritenour
W Wellston WG Webster Groves
WG
Washington
Kirkwood
Rockwood
? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
AF
? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
BA
HP
Lindbergh
Mehlville
Fox
(White dots signify control districts)
7
Strong Results Were Widespread
  • Major Urban District
  • 86 Schools, 32,000 Students
  • Predominantly Minority Students
  • High Free/ Reduced

20
  • Suburban District
  • 9 Schools, 3,800 Students
  • 72 White, 26 Black
  • Only 3 Free/ Reduced

19
8
Best Performers Grew an Astonishing 34
  • The top 60 schools (roughly 25 of the test) were
    labeled Best Performers. Their growth was
    driven by a number of variables. Most common was
    the integration of multiple marketing activities
  • Posters and POS Local awareness building at
    school
  • Sampling Prizes, giveaways, etc.

9
The Best Performers Realized 3X the Overall
Growth in Milk Sales
  • The 60 Best Performers are a mix of
  • Elementary, Junior and Senior High
  • Schools with a history of low and high milk
    consumption (per student)

10
Best Performer Source of Growth
  • The Top Performers achieved strong balanced
    growth from all four of the test activities.
  • Improved Chocolate and contemporary graphics
    accounted for one-third of the growth.
  • New flavors and local support each contributed a
    quarter of the growth.

After adjusting for cannibalization.
11
Source of Growth
12
Meal Participation Also Increased
  • Breakfast and lunch participation (ADP) was
    tracked for all control and test schools.
  • All three of the test cells outperformed the
    control schools for both break-fast and lunch ADP.

13
Nine Key Learnings Were Identified
  1. School Milk Improvements are Newsworthy
  2. Marketing Materials were Widely Used
  3. New Flavors Drive Growth
  4. Sampling Delivers Trial (and Sales)
  5. Integrated Marketing Yields Strongest Results
  6. Results Dont Happen Without In-School Support
  7. Improved Milks Impacts Juice
  8. Improvements Can Payout Quickly
  9. Marketing Choices Matter, Demographics May Not

14
Improved Milk Results in 11 More Servings per
Student Annually
Incremental Units per Week Incremental Units per Week Annual Incremental Consumption per Student Annual Incremental Consumption per Student
per School per Student Units Gallons
Elementary 160 .39 14.0 .88
Jr./Sr. High 152 .20 7.3 .46
3.7 1.4
11 Additional Units per Student
Annually Translates to 600 Million Units
Annually Across U.S.
15
National Implication Growth in the Hundreds of
Millions for Milk Meal ADP
Broad adoption of the improvements tested in St.
Louis will deliver hundreds of millions of
additional meals and milk servings.
Total U.S. Impact Total U.S. Impact
Net Change Per Day Annual
Milk Sales (Units) 12.2 3.3 Million 600 Million

Meals (ADP Rate)
Breakfast .6 pts. 350,000 63 Million
Lunch 1.3 pts. 760,000 137 Million
Net Change Test vs. Fall 2004 for Test
Schools vs. Control Assumes 58 Million
students and 180 school days/ year
16
Quick Payout Found For Virtually All Tested
Improvements
Improvement Payout Timing
Posters POS Material Immediate
Prizes, Giveaways 3-6 Weeks
Sampling 2-3 Weeks
Improved Packaging Flexo Litho Self-funded by Sales/ ADP Increase Self-funded if other activities (above) are included, otherwise 80 funded.
Improved New Flavors Modest Sales Growth Delivers Quick Payout
Payout is the estimated time needed for the
schools variable profit to equal their
incremental cost.
17
Table of Contents
  • Background
  • Executive Summary
  • Objective, Scope Measurement
  • Key Learnings
  • Appendix

18
Objective
  • The objective of the test was to quantify the
    impact of various improvements in the school meal
    line milk product offering.
  • The improvements included
  • From To
  • Chocolate Formulation School
    formula Retail formula
  • Packaging Look 1-Color Generic Multi-Color
    Child Orientated modern graphics (2 types)
  • Adding Flavors . Chocolate Only Chocolate
    plus Strawberry
    Vanilla
  • Variety of Ways to Encourage Milk Consumption

19
Scope Components Product
Control
Flexo 3 (Cell 1)
Flexo 4 (Cell 2)
Litho 4 (Cell 3)
White
School Chocolate
Retail Chocolate
Product
Add Strawberry
No Change
Add Vanilla
1-Color Flexo
Offset Litho
Improved Flexo Carton
Package
20
Scope Components School Sample
  • The majority of schools in metro St. Louis were
    involved in some way.

of Control Flexo 3 Flexo 4 Litho 4 TOTAL
Districts 11 7 9 6 30
Schools 120 69 138 83 410
Students 75,566 33,655 84,442 46,734 240,397
290 Schools 164,831 Students
  • The cells were balanced demographically on
  • Urban Suburban
  • Ethnic Racial mix
  • Foodservice operations Self Op and 2
    Foodservice Mgt. Co.s in each cell
  • Average school enrollment
  • Presence of competing beverages (a la carte and
    vending)
  • Test began as school reopened in January and
    continued until Summer.

21
Improved School Milk Test Greater St. Louis Area
Troy
Orchard Farms
St. Charles
Hazelwood
Wentzville
Riverview Gardens
Ferguson Florissant
Pattonville
JN
RI
NO
Francis Howell
W
Parkway
St. Louis City
Ladue
CL
MR
B
AF Affton B Brentwood BA Bayless CL
Clayton HP Hancock Place JN Jennings MR
Maplewood-Richmond NO Normandy RI Ritenour
W Wellston WG Webster Groves
Kirkwood
WG
Washington
Rockwood
AF
BA
HP
Lindbergh
Mehlville
The test cells were dispersed throughout the
greater St. Louis area.
Fox
22
Marketing Tool Kit Developed by MilkPEP
  • Branded Point of Sale Materials
  • 24 x 36 Posters
  • 5 x 20 Static Clings
  • Mobiles (17)

23
Marketing Tool Kit (contd)
  • Generic got milk? posters
  • Best Friends and Superhero Mirror POS
  • Sampling Program Guidelines
  • Suggested Communications to Students Parents

24
Marketing Tool Kit (contd)
  • Promotion Ideas Awards
  • got milk? smiley face sticker sheets
  • got milk? bucket hats, frisbees
  • WB Shake Stuff Up CDs
  • got chocolate milk? t-shirts
  • Club Milk membership cards
  • got milk? smiley face buttons for cafeteria
    workers
  • Schools (and Foodservice Mgt. Co.s) were
    responsible for their own marketing plans and
    implementation.
  • This insured results would be transferable.

25
Scope Components Temperature, Production
Distribution
  • Addressed schools with temperature issues.
  • New equipment provided for 20 schools judged in
    need.
  • Equipment placements were proportional among test
    and control cells.
  • All test cell product is produced at the Prairie
    Farms (PF) Pevely plant in St. Louis.
  • Distribution has not changed from Fall 2004.
  • 3 PF DCs and 2 independent distributors.
  • Same PF route or distributor.
  • Same delivery frequency and time of day.
  • Same ordering process.
  • Same competitive products (juice, etc.), unless
    school decided to change.

26
Improved School Milk Test Measurement
WHATS SELLING? Prairie Farms Shipment Data
  • Prairie Farms Shipment Data
  • Net deliveries to each school
  • Milk pint and ½ pint
  • Juice

WHAT ARE PEOPLE SAYING?
INSIGHT What Works Why?
  • Marketing Activities
  • Sampling
  • Awareness Building
  • Poster placement
  • Announcements, menus, newsletters, website, etc.
  • Promotion
  • Description, timing and impact
  • Comments and Feedback from
  • Children
  • Foodservice Workers
  • Foodservice Directors
  • Teachers and Administrators
  • Parents
  • Gathered throughout the test by
  • Surveys
  • Interviews
  • Weblog
  • Site Visits

TEST REPORT KEY LEARNINGS
27
Table of Contents
  • Background
  • Executive Summary
  • Objective, Scope Measurement
  • Key Learnings
  • Appendix

28
Key Learnings
  1. School Milk Improvements are Newsworthy
  2. Marketing Materials were Widely Used
  3. New Flavors Drive Growth
  4. Sampling Delivers Trial (and Sales)
  5. Integrated Marketing Yields Strongest Results
  6. Results Dont Happen Without In-School Support
  7. Improved Milks Impacts Juice
  8. Improvements Can Payout Quickly
  9. Marketing Choices Matter, Demographics May Not

29
Key Learning 1 School Milk Improvements are
Newsworthy
30
Positive Press Coverage at Launch
Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
31
Key Learning 2 Marketing Materials Were Widely
Used
  • 80 of schools used portions of the 10 items in
    the kit. The average school used half of the
    items.

of Schools Using __ Elements
of Elements
32
Marketing Materials Were Widely Used (contd)
  • Two out of three schools used some combination of
    posters and hat/ frisbee giveaways. Schools using
    give-aways also used one or more of the posters.

33
Flavors grew 15-16 without cannibalizing White
milk.
Key Learning 3 New Flavors Drive Growth
Change in Average Weekly Units per Student Test
vs. Fall 2004
Flavor bar colors represents mix of flavor sales,
not source of growth.
34
Key Learning 3 New Flavors Drive Growth
  • Control schools did not experience much change.
  • White milk in the test cells also did not
    experience much change.
  • The new flavors were largely incremental.

Change in Weekly Average School Milk Units (1/2
pints)
Test Cell White Chocolate White Chocolate Strawberry Vanilla TOTAL of S V that was Incremental
Control -1 -1 -2 --- --- -2 ---
Flexo 3 8 -46 -38 153 --- 115 75
Flexo 4 1 -178 -177 134 190 147 45
Litho 4 -8 -125 -133 122 149 138 51
35
Flavor Preferences Varied by School Even Within
the Same District
Not self-evident what the flavor offering should
be for each school. Experimentation is needed to
find the right mix.
36
Foodservice Professionals Believe Flavors Drove
Growth, followed by Posters/Attention
  • What do you think is driving the change?
    (Answered by Foodservice Directors Cafeteria
    Staff)

of Foodservice Professionals
New Flavors
93
Promotion/ Posters
39
34
Attention to Milk
29
Improved Packaging
16
Sampling
37
New Flavors Case Study O Middle School
School Comment
O Middle School Despite enrollment decline and schedule change that reduced breakfast for 15 students, Milk units grew by over 400 per week. Consumption per student grew 31 to over 4 servings per week. Despite enrollment decline and schedule change that reduced breakfast for 15 students, Milk units grew by over 400 per week. Consumption per student grew 31 to over 4 servings per week.
38
Key Learning 4 Sampling Delivers Trial (and
Sales)
  • Numerous schools conducted sampling days.
  • MilkPEP marketing kit provided a How to guide.
  • Schools scheduled, staffed and funded sampling on
    their own.
  • Sampling product costs were recouped by the
    schools in 2-4 weeks through profits from
    increased sales.
  • Schools that sampled averaged 17 sales growth
    compared to the 12 test average.
  • Case Studies
  • Elementary Jr. High Sr. High
  • A, C, F R L, Q, N

39
Sampling Case Study A Elementary
School Comment Growth
A Elementary Wow! Our children really loved the new milk. They were very excited about the new brightly colored cartons. We are selling less juice and more milk since this campaign started. We had an awesome time with the prize giveaways. This really helped the promotion. Feb. 10th 9 1,373-1,500 Pre-Post Sampling
A Elementary We have a team rally at our school once a quarter. We made 4 milk cartons, 1 for each flavor and picked four teachers to participate in a milk mustache campaign. 2 principals and 2 teachers sat in chairs and held the colored milk cartons (made out of cardboard) to represent the four flavors. They then drank some milk and the children voted for the best mustache. The next day we sampled the different flavors. The principals wore their got milk? t-shirts all day to help us promote the milk. March 17th 9 1,373-1,500 Pre-Post Sampling
40
Flavor Variety (Led by Chocolate) Drives Growth
C Elementary
School Comment Growth
C Elementary My kids like the new Strawberry and Vanilla after trying them. They think the Chocolate is a little too sweet, but they like it Chocolate is still their favorite. 9.9
Less Administration support than other schools in
the district.
Fall Test Difference
Enrollment 453 454 .2
ADP Breakfast Lunch 13.5 61.0 14.8 62.6 1.3 points 1.6 points
Milk Units Total per Student 1,352 2.98 1,486 3.27 9.9 9.7
(per week)
41
Sampling Case Study F Elementary
School Comment Growth
F Elementary Sampled all three flavors at once. Students like Vanilla (tastes like a milkshake), while teachers prefer Strawberry. I keep my cooler at 29. 18
Fall Test Difference
Enrollment 648 656 1.2
ADP Breakfast Lunch 37.1 84.3 38.8 87.9 1.7 points 3.6 points
Milk Units Total per Student 3,409 5.26 4,017 6.12 18 16
(per week)
42
Sampling Case Study R Middle
School Comment Growth
R Middle We had a sampling day January 27th. Our math and science teachers had their classes sample all four flavors and graph the results. Graphs were hung in the cafeteria to show results. Chocolate was by far the most accepted, then Vanilla and White. Our students did not care for Strawberry. During sampling, we handed out prizes as students picked up Vanilla or Strawberry. Many of the got milk? posters are hung throughout the cafeteria, while others were given away as prizes. 19
Fall Test Difference
Enrollment 532 523 -1.7
ADP Breakfast Lunch 7.3 41.7 9.2 45.5 1.9 points 3.8 points
Milk Units Total per Student 993 1.87 1,180 2.26 19 21
(per week)
43
Sampling Case Study L High School
School Comment Growth
L High School The High School held a sampling event in January for the Strawberry, Vanilla and Chocolate. The students really enjoyed the improved Chocolate milk. The Strawberry and Vanilla were split, some really like the Vanilla because it tasted like ice cream, while others liked the Strawberry tasted like Strawberry syrup in their milk at home. 21
Average Weekly Units
44
Sampling Case Study Q High School
  • Sampling doubled Vanilla and Strawberry sales.
  • Payback on sampling cost achieved in two weeks.

Average Weekly Units
1,725
1,536
Vanilla
1,345
1,160
Strawberry
Chocolate
White
(4 wks)
(7 wks)
45
Sampling Case Study N High School
  • Sampling occurred later (Week 8) than in other
    schools.
  • Impact, while strong, was less than those
    sampling during Weeks 2-4.
  • Payback occurred in 3-4 weeks.

Average Weekly Units
1,400
1,193
1,163
Vanilla
1,029
Strawberry
Chocolate
White
(4 wks)
(4 wks)
46
Key Learning 5 Integrated Marketing Yields the
Strongest Results
  • Numerous schools took advantage of the broad
    range of suggestions to encourage students to
    drink milk.
  • Most schools used half of the marketing kit.
  • Multiple activities yielded the strongest results.

Cumulative effect of marketing tactics on top of
new flavors/packaging.
  • Case Studies
  • Elementary Sr. High Spotlight on Webster
    Groves
  • G B, P H, I, J

47
Integrated Marketing Case Study G Elementary
School Comment Growth
G Elementary We used most of the marketing kit posters and giveaways. Chocolate is more chocolaty, Vanilla is like a milk shake but Strawberry tastes like medicine. Teachers like Vanilla in their coffee. Several parents have commented liking the wider variety. Saw a big increase in lunch ADP. 22
Fall Test Difference
Enrollment 863 867 .5
ADP Breakfast Lunch --- 58.4 --- 60.8 --- 2.4 points
Milk Units Total per Student 2,152 2.49 2,618 3.02 22 21
(per week)
48
Integrated Marketing Activities B High School
School Comment Growth
B High School Marketing Activities Brand Poster Cafeteria workers wore got milk? t-shirts and buttons Sampled all three flavors 67 261-435
Strong results from very under developed school
where Milk has lots of competition..
School requested/used extra P-O-P materials
Competitive Environment
A LA CARTE Competing Beverages Available - Sports/ Energy Drinks - Bottled Water - Juices
VENDING 6 Machines in Hallways - Soft Drinks - Sports/ Energy Drinks - Juice - Water - Tea
Enrollment 910 (Mixed School - 70 White, 20
Black, 10 A/0)
49
Integrated Marketing Activities P High School
Students really love Strawberry over Chocolate and Vanilla. Promoting milk at breakfast with cereal. Teachers notice the increase by students and believe self-discipline has improved. Used posters, prizes and conducted sampling in first few weeks. New flavors have also been added to after school snack program twice a week. Vanilla milk and donut makes a great combo.
50
Spotlight on
  • 8 Schools 3,800 Students (72 White, 26 Black,
    2 Other)

Impact of Flavors Change in Flavors
  • Schools Selected Their Own Activities (most did
    several)
  • Posters
  • Giveaways/ Contests
  • Sampling
  • Solved Temperature Issues
  • Awareness Building

43 Elementary (H)
29 Elementary
24 Elementary
10 High School
48 Elementary (J)
57 Jr High (I)
25 Elementary
53 Elementary
The following two pages highlight three of these
schools H, I J.
51
Case Study H, I J Elementary
School Comment Growth
H Elementary At first, Strawberry was most popular. After sampling, Vanilla ran out. Chocolate still leads an increase of about 25 Students who normally bring a drink with their lunch now buy milk. Students loved taste testing. 22 547-667
I Middle Love the Vanilla, tastes like ice cream. 32 459-604
J Elementary Students like the new cartons. Vanilla and Chocolate are big hits. 38 853-1,173
H Elementary Fall Test Difference
Enrollment 213 208 -2.3
ADP Breakfast Lunch 15.0 51.9 16.7 56.4 1.7 points 4.5 points
Milk Units Total per Student 547 2.57 667 3.21 22 25
(per week)
52
New Milk flavors caused students to switch back
from Juice.
Case Study H, I J Elementary (contd.)
Weekly Units/ Student
Avg Weekly Units/ School
I Middle
908
1.4
955
1.4
J Elementary
1,345
4.0
1,366
4.1
53
Key Learning 6 Results Dont Happened Without
In-School Support
  • The level of support at an individual school can
    have a tremendous impact positive and negative.
  • Several examples of poor or no support were
    examined.
  • Case Studies
  • Elementary Jr. High Sr. High
  • D M S, E

54
In-School Support Case Study D Elementary
School Comment Growth
D Elementary Students were very excited at first. They didnt realize Chocolate was different for a few days. They lost interest after a few days. Overall consumption is about the same as before. (late Feb.) 9.8
Average Weekly Units
55
Poor Support Poor Results Case Study M Middle
School Comment Growth
M Middle School Didnt have time for sampling. Giveaways were given to random computer selected students. I stopped ordering Strawberry after just a few weeks. 11
Token support and results did not last.
Average Weekly Units
1,330
1,306
1,259
1,150
1,125
1,122
Test
56
Dramatic Turnaround Case Study S High School
Interim staff January March. Uncooperative principal until face-to-face meeting around Spring Break. Results after fixing staff and support problems were dramatically different!
Average Weekly Units
1,388
1,213
928
825
788
750
Enrollment of 1,093. Many competing beverages,
including 6 vending machines in the cafeteria.
57
Case Study E High School
Good results, despite cafeteria manager.
School Comment Growth
E High School Too sweet! I dont order Vanilla or Strawberry any more. Dont sell as much as I used to. Dont like the added sugar.
31
58
Key Learning 7 Improved Milks Stopped Juice
Growth
  • Roughly 40 of the test and control schools offer
    juices on the meal line (breakfast and/or lunch).
  • For these 189 schools, a separate analysis was
    performed to understand the interaction driven by
    the new flavors and packaging.
  • Conclusion The improved milks captured beverage
    growth in test schools, while juice grew in the
    control schools.

Change in Average Weekly Units Test vs. Fall 2004
Control
Test
Juice Juice Drinks
59
Some Test Schools Changed Juice Availability
  • The result was a shift in beverage consumption.
  • Conclusion Foodservice professionals variety
    choices can/ do impact milk consumption and
    nutrition delivery.

Change in Average Weekly Units Test vs. Fall 2004
Subset of Schools that Juice Milk
Reduced Juice Availability (n20) -156 203 Milk Growth 14
Saw Large Juice Growth (n25) 133 76 Milk Growth 4
60
Reduction in Juice Availability K Elementary
  • Sharon (Cafeteria Manager) decided to reduce
    juice offering when new flavors of milk became
    available.
  • Milk grew 680 units/ week (33), while juice
    declined 318 per week (-36).

61
Key Learning 8 Improvements Can Payout Quickly
The changes implemented in both this test and the
earlier one (New Look of School Milk) can be
evaluated and considered for application piece by
piece, or taken as a package. The graphic below
illustrates one way to evaluate whether the cost/
benefit relationship provides an appropriate
payout or Return on Investment (ROI).
Payout is the estimated time needed for the
schools variable profit to equal their
incremental cost.
62
Key Learning 8 Improvements Can Payout Quickly
(contd)
Using estimates from various industry
participants the graph below illustrates the
relative cost associated with various
improvements.
63
Key Learning 8 Improvements Can Payout Quickly
(contd)
Improvement
Relative Cost
Relative Payout
Banners, Posters, Buttons Other POS Material Prizes, Giveaways, etc. Posters are usually available at no charge from MilkPEP and Dairy Council. Prizes/ giveaways can range from 50-150 per school. Posters, banners have immediate benefit. Prize/giveaway payout averaged 3-6 weeks.
Sampling A sampling day usually costs 20-40 worth of product and cups. Recommend using students or existing staff. Payout usually occurs in 2-3 weeks.
Improved Packaging Graphics Litho is more expensive than Flexo, but delivered similar flavor growth. Flexo Sales/ADP increase self-funded the extra cost Litho Self-funded when combined with in-school marketing activities above.
Improved New Flavors Recommend 3-4 flavors plus a flavor rotation program. Modest sales increase delivers quick payout.
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Key Learning 9 Marketing Choices Matter,
Demographics May Not
  • Various demographic and marketing variables were
    gathered and monitored in the test schools to
    help correlate their influence on Milk sales.

Demographic Marketing Choices
Neighborhood Household Income Availability of Competing Beverages On Meal Line Vending Milk Vending Milk Packaging (Flexo vs. Litho) Activities (addressed earlier) Sampling Posters (Branded got milk?) Prizes/ Giveaways Awareness Building
Student Ethnic Mix Availability of Competing Beverages On Meal Line Vending Milk Vending Milk Packaging (Flexo vs. Litho) Activities (addressed earlier) Sampling Posters (Branded got milk?) Prizes/ Giveaways Awareness Building
School Type Elementary Jr. High Sr. High Availability of Competing Beverages On Meal Line Vending Milk Vending Milk Packaging (Flexo vs. Litho) Activities (addressed earlier) Sampling Posters (Branded got milk?) Prizes/ Giveaways Awareness Building
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Key Learning 9 Marketing Choices Matter,
Demographics May Not (contd)
Did results vary based on
Demographic
Answer - Explanation
Household Income in Neighborhoods Surrounding the School? No While schools in lower income neighborhoods outperformed other schools by a few percentage points, this was also true for the control group. Therefore income was not a significant driver of test results.
Ethnic Mix of Students? No Ethnically mixed schools outperformed schools dominated (gt80) by one ethnic group. This also occurred in the control schools.
Students Age? No Even though the percent increase was stronger in Secondary schools, they started from a smaller base. The flavors and packaging were found equally appealing to the different age groups.
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Key Learning 9 Marketing Choices Matter,
Demographics May Not (contd)
Did results vary based on
Marketing Choices
Answer - Explanation
Availability of Competing Beverages on the Meal Line? Yes Milk growth was 2-3 points higher in schools that offered more competing beverages (50/50 and 100 juice). This suggests that a strong line-up of flavors can influence students to switch back to drinking milk.
Availability of Vending Machines (non-milk) in Jr./Sr. High Schools? Yes Schools with vending machines out performed schools without machines by 3-7 percentage points. Students seeking a variety of flavors now had such choices within the meal line milk offering.
Availability of Vended Milk Products in Jr./ Sr. High Schools? Yes Across all three test cells, the presence of milk vending correlated with much stronger growth in 8 oz. Cartons (by 13 points). This may indicate a preexisting preference for milk (institutional and/or student) or greater familiarity with flavored milks.
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Key Learning 9 Marketing Choices Matter,
Demographics May Not (contd)
Did results vary based on
Marketing Choices
Answer - Explanation
Type of Packaging Flexo vs. Offset Litho? No The sales growth was the same in the cells with four flavors of Flexo and Litho cartons. Artwork/ graphics quality and appeal to the target consumer are the most critical factors in such a comparison. The consumer did not notice or experience any functional differences. Both designs proved equally appealing to the students. Traditional copy testing techniques can be used to further value the differences between various designs.
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Table of Contents
  • Background
  • Executive Summary
  • Objective, Scope Measurement
  • Key Learnings
  • Appendix

69
Improved School Milk Test Final Report
  • June 2005
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