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The Role of Leadership in Implementing A Technology-Integrated Curriculum

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Title: The Role of Leadership in Implementing A Technology-Integrated Curriculum


1
The Role of Leadership in Implementing A
Technology-Integrated Curriculum
0
  • Presented at the 2009 ASCD National Conference
  • Presented by Glenn Maleyko, Principal, Ph. D
    Candidate
  • Bob Attee, Science Teacher Administrative
    Intern
  • Kareem Naimi, Bilingual Resource Teacher
  • Salina Intermediate School, Dearborn, Michigan
  • Dearborn Public Schools

2
All of us can consciously decide to leave behind
a life of mediocrity and to live a life of
greatness---at home, at work and in the
community. No matter what our circumstances may
be, such a decision can be made by everyone of
us. Stephen Covey
0
Pg. 29
3
Whether that greatness is manifest by choosing to
have a magnificent spirit in facing an incurable
disease, by simply making a difference in the
life of a child, given that child a sense of
worth and potential, by becoming a
change-catalyst inside an organization, or by
becoming an initiator of a great cause in
society.
0
4
We all have the power to decide to live a great
life, or even simpler, to have not only a good
day but a great day. No matter how long weve
walked lifes pathway to mediocrity, we can
always choose to switch paths. Always. Its never
too late. We can find our voice.
0
Pg. 29.
5
These People just realize that they cant wait
for their boss or the organization to change.
They become an island of excellence in a sea of
mediocrity. And its contagious.
0
6
The history of a free man is never written by
chance but by choice their choice.
0
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower

7
Activity 1
  • Turn to a partner and discuss the following
    questions
  • What is your reaction to the quotation from
    Steven Covey and Eisenhower?
  • What implications does this have on your
    perception of leadership?

8
Technology Standards for School Administrators
0
  • International Society for Technology Education
    (ISTE) Publications
  • http//www.iste.org

9
ISTE standards for Administrators
  • 1. Leadership and Vision
  • 2. Learning and Teaching
  • 3. Productivity and Professional Practice
  • 4. Support, Management, and Operations
  • 5. Assessment and Evaluation
  • 6. Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues

10
Within the Standards there are performance
Indicators For
0
  • Campus leaders or Principals
  • District Leaders
  • The Superintendent and Cabinet.

11
Standard I. Leadership and Vision
0
  • Educational Leaders inspire a shared vision for
    comprehensive integration of technology and frost
    an environment and culture conducive to the
    realization of that vision.

12
What is our frame of mind?
  • Is the Glass half full or half empty?
  • www.Walkthetalk.com

13
Education leaders foster and nurture a culture of
responsible risk-taking and advocate policies
promoting continuous innovation with technology.
0
  • Performance Indicator I.C

14
VisionWe envision an innovative, successful
school where diversity is respected and
celebrated, where all students use higher order
thinking skills to meet high standards developed
collaboratively by a motivated, compassionate,
and highly skilled staff, working in partnership
with parents and the community.
15
Visionary Leaders
  • Leaders can use vision to build trust rather than
    break it if they are willing to let their
    rhetoric give way to reality and allow their
    vision to become a blueprint rather than public
    relations baloney.
  • Reeves, Douglas (2006). The learning Leader.

16
  • Effective visions help individuals understand
    that they are part of a larger world and also
    reassure them of their individual importance to
    the organization.
  • Reeves, Douglas (2006). The learning Leader.

17
People want to be part of something larger than
themselves. They want to be part of something
theyre really proud of, that theyll fight for,
sacrifice for , trust. Howard Schultz
18
Salina Intermediate Mission
  • The mission of Salina Intermediate School is to
    increase academic achievement by implementing and
    evaluating a technology integrated comprehensive
    curriculum which enables students to become
    literate problem-solving critical thinkers. We
    have high expectations for all students, and
    provide a safe and nurturing environment
    collaboratively with parents and community to
    ensure that all students become responsible,
    productive citizens.

19
Activity 2
  • Discuss with a partner the following question
  • Why is it essential to have clear mission and
    vision statements?
  • What does a mission or vision statement tell us
    about an organization?

20
Poll everywhere surveyhttp//www.polleverywhere.
com
0
21
Salina Immigration Status 2007-08 School Year
22
Salina Intermediate Limited English Proficient
Population
23
Economically Disadvantaged Studentsat Salina
Intermediate 2008-09
24
We face many barriers, but
  • We have been effective at improving student
    achievement levels through the use of technology,
    literacy, and differentiated instruction under
    Professional Learning Communities model!

25
Schools Do Make a Difference
  • Effective School Research of Ron Edmunds, Larry
    Lezotte, Wilbur Bookover, Michael Rutter, and
    other concluded
  • All children can learn and the school controls
    the factors to assure student mastery of the core
    curriculum

Rebecca Dufour, PLC presentation
26
Schools Do Make a Difference
  • An analysis of research conducted over a
    thirty-five year period demonstrates that schools
    that are highly effective produce results that
    almost entirely overcome the effects of student
    backgrounds.
  • Robert Marzano, What works in schools, 2003.

27
Standard V Assessment and Evaluation
  • Educational leaders use technology to plan and
    implement comprehensive systems of effective
    assessment and evaluation.

28
Salina Intermediate ELA AYP Proficiency Growth
29
Salina Intermediate Mathematics AYP Proficiency
Growth
30
Salina AYP proficiency Growth
31
Salina AYP proficiency Growth
32
at Salina Intermediate
O
FAILURE
N
T
O
AN
IS
OPTION
at Salina Intermediate
FAILURE
IS
AN
OPTION
N
T
33
There must Be a Cultural Shift in how we do
business on a day to day basis.
34
Fullan (2008) The Six Secrets of Change
  • Secret One Love your employees
  • Secret Two Connect peers with purpose
  • Secret Three Capacity Building Prevails
  • Secret Four Learning is the work
  • Secret Five Transparency
  • Secret Six Systems Learn

35
Marzano, Waters and McNulty (2005) 1st order
change vs. 2nd order change
  • 1st order change all of the 21 responsibilities
    apply
  • 1st order change is incremental. It can be
    thought of as the next most obvious step to take.

36
2nd order change
  • 2nd order change is anything but incremental. It
    involves dramatic departures from the expected,
    both in defining a given problem and in finding a
    solution.
  • Marzano, McNaulty and Waters (2005).

37
2nd order change
  • Leadership for second order change includes the
    following
  • Knowledge of Curriculum, Instr. Assessment.
  • Optimizer
  • Intellectual Stimulation
  • Change Agent
  • Monitoring/Evaluating
  • Flexibility
  • Ideals/Beliefs
  • Marzano, McNaulty and Waters (2005).
  • Negatively impacted responsibilities
  • Culture
  • Communication
  • Order
  • Input

38
Standard IV Support, Management and Operations
  • Educational leaders ensure the integration of
    technology to support productive systems for
    learning and administration

39
Monitoring and Evaluating
  • Classroom Walkthroughs are a critical component
    within the School Improvement Process at Salina
    Intermediate.
  • I looked at articles published by ASCD.
  • The Three Minute Classroom Walk-Through by
    Carolyn Downey.

40
Downey(2004) Walk through
  • The most important thing is conversations and
    building relationships with faculty.
  • 5 Step Downy Approach
  • 1. Student Orientation to the work
  • 2. Curricular Decision Points
  • 3. Instructional Decision Points
  • 4. Walk the Walls---Curricular and Instructional
    Decision
  • Points
  • 5. Safety and Health Issues

41
Dtubehttp//video.dearbornschools.org/
42
A Traditional School Focuses on Teaching and a
Professional Learning Community Focuses on
Student Learning.
43
The thing that does not make a Difference
0
  • Technology is not a magic pill for school reform.
    The mere presence of technology will make no
    difference in student performance, particularly
    if it is unused or misused
  • The Technology Bond without training is not going
    to provide for an enhanced curriculum.

2002 MAKING TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS WORK FOR YOU
ISTE.
44
Cultural Shifts Becoming a Professional Learning
Community
0
  • To put it as succinctly as possible, if you want
    to change and improve the climate and outcomes of
    schooling both for students and teachers, there
    are features of the school culture that have to
    be changed, and if they are not changed your
    well-intentioned efforts will be defeated

Seymour Sarason Taken From Robert Eaker PLC
presentation.
45
Cultural Shift
Traditional School Professional Learning Community
Teacher Isolation Collaboration
Decisions about improvement are opinion based. Decisions are researched based with collaborative teams seeking out best practices.
When students dont learn not systematic response. Systematic response as to how the school responds when students dont learn.
Administrators are viewed a leaders and teachers as followers. Administrators are leaders of leaders teachers are transformational leaders.
Decisions about improvement are opinion based. Decisions are researched based with collaborative teams seeking out best practices.
46
Activity 3
  • Reflecting on the differences between a
    Professional Learning Community and a Traditional
    School, what dynamic differences can you help to
    implement in your school?

47
It is critical to develop a PLC calendar for the
building
  • Use an electronic Calendar.
  • We use outlook for PC and entourage for Macintosh
    computers

48
Educational leaders facilitate and support
collaborative technology enriched learning
Environments conducive for innovation for
improved learning.
  • Performance Indicator II.B.

49
Team Collaboration
  • We can achieve our fundamental purpose of high
    levels of learning for all students only if we
    work together. We cultivate this collaborative
    culture through the development of high
    performing teams.

Dufour Eaker
50
Advantages of collaborative teams
  • provide support for new teachers
  • promote confidence among staff members
  • allow teachers to work together to find quality
    solutions
  • provide opportunities for sharing ideas,
    materials, and methods for better teaching
  • enhance student achievement

51
  • Effective collaborative teams share knowledge,
    define learning standards, agree on pacing, build
    knowledge of best practice, and focus on issues
    that MOST impact student achievement.

52
Standard III Productivity and Professional
Practice
  • Educational leaders apply technology to enhance
    their professional practice and to increase their
    own productivity and that of others.

53
Team Norms video on D-Tube
  • Dearborn Public Schools
  • http//www.dearbornschools.org/

54
Team Meetings components
  • Three important components keep the team focus
    and help to subdue the resistors
  • 1. The development of Team Norms
  • 2. The development of Team Goals
  • 3. Sustaining Good team leadership (This could be
    one or two individuals.

55
(No Transcript)
56
Activity 4
  • During the Team Norms Video, identify the
    positive and negative elements took place during
    the team meetings using a tally sheet.
  • View the Team Norms Video

57
Standard II Learning and Teaching
  • Educational leaders ensure that curricular
    design, instructional strategies, and learning
    environments integrate appropriate technologies
    to maximize learning and teaching.

58
Intended VS. Implemented Curriculum
  • Intended Curriculum- the essential concepts that
    you plan to teach
  • Implemented Curriculum- your executed lesson
    plans, what you actually teach
  • By comparing the two on a regular basis over
    time, teams will have a more clear concise
    response to What must students know?

59
W. M. Glasser
60
(No Transcript)
61
Salina Technology
  • Data projector, Document camera and promethean
    board in most of the classrooms.
  • Full wireless connectivity
  • 9 mobile wireless labs
  • Community Center with Technology access
  • A media broadcast studio with a green screen for
    video production
  • Multimedia software applications
  • Activote systems.

62
Standard VI Social, Legal and Ethical Issues
  • Educational leaders understand the social, legal
    and ethical issues related to technology and
    model responsible decision-making related to
    these issues.

63
Educational Leaders Advocate for research-based
effective practices in use of technology
  • Performance Indicator I.E.
  • Student Projects and Inquiry Learning

64
Additional Reference Slides
  • Not part of the presentation

65
Activity 5
  • How can leaders promote systemic change in the
    assessment strategies teachers implement?

66
Team Collaboration and the 3 Essential Questions
  • Question Three
  • 3. How will we respond when they dont learn?

67
Salina Intermediate PLC Pyramid of Interventions
IF STUDENTS DO NOT MEET EXPECTATIONS . . .

04-02-07
School Mentoring Peer Mediation Title I
Tutoring Instructional Dialogues Communication
Box Social Work intervention 21st Century
Program Parent-Principal Forums SOS
program Counseling Detention/ISS, Brunch with
Social Workers CRSD Rec Program Social Work
Interns Career Education Community Resource
Center Bilingual Support
Bullying Prevention
PICL MODEL PICL MODEL Advisor/Advisee
Technology Integration Writing
Program
Team/ Grade Level Pullout Study Skills Support
w/ Samira Bullying Intervention Community
Safety w/ William Ali Parent Liaison Support Home
Visit Co-teaching Intervention Referral
Process Parent Communication and Meeting DRA
assessment Team Collaboration Time
Classroom Flexible Grouping Intervention
Referral Teacher-student conference Classroom
Behavior/ Academic Plan Formative assessment
follow-up retest Student portfolios Classroom
Behavior/ Academic Plan Differentiated
Instruction Parent Conference/Contact
68
Team Collaboration and the 3 Essential Questions
  • A new, fourth question is How will we respond
    when they have learned?

69
Salina Intermediate PLC Pyramid of
Interventions 04-02-07 IF STUDENTS EXCEED
EXCPECTATIONS . . .

School IGNITE STAND Emerging Scholars DCMST
Partnership Peer Mediators Academic Games Math
Counts Student Council Academic Games CRSD Rec
Program Inter-School Multicultural Technology
Partnerships Media Broadcast
Technology Camp Career Education
Science Club
Bullying Prevention
PICL MODEL Advisor/Advisee
Technology Integration Wrting
Program
Team/ Grade Level Co-teaching Student
Mentors Team Teaching Team Collaboration Time
Classroom Flexible Grouping Enrichment
Activities Teacher-student conference Above Grade
Level Assignments Differentiated
Instruction Student led co-teaching
presentations/lessons Technology
Trainers Classroom leadership Committees or Clubs
70
Page 88 Admin standards book
  • Alan November (1998) suggests that technology has
    not been fully integrated into the education
    environment because its use is viewed as an
    additional layer over what is already done rather
    than as an information and communication tool
    that can that can change the structure of the
    organization.

71
  • Because there is great potential for
    organizational change through the use of
    technology tools, administrators need to be
    active players in technology integration.
    November also differentiated between automating,
    what happens when technology is layered on the
    existing system, and infomating what occurs when
    systemic change is achieved using information and
    communication. As mentioned above

72
  • November suggests that doing the same old thing
    faster should not be your goal, but rather it
    should be making better use of information and
    how you use it, which may, in turn, lead to some
    time being saved or better used.

73
Engaging in Dialogue
  • Strategies offered in Crucial Conversations
  • Clarify what you do and dont want to result from
    the conversation
  • Find mutual purpose
  • Create a safe environment for dialogue
  • Use facts
  • Share your thought process
  • Encourage recipients to share facts and thought
    process

74
Confronting resistors
  • Even after an open dialogue, resistors may
    persist. Leaders must act as promoters and
    protectors of decisions and
  • Continue working with the resistor
  • Make no exemption from the collaborative process
  • Clarify the specific behaviors required
  • Clarify specific consequences
  • Monitor behavior rather than attitude
  • Apply the specified consequences, if necessary

75
Administrator Expectations and Support for
Teachers!
0
  • Both are critical.

76
Making A Difference
0
  • What does make a difference is a school
    administrator at any level who is a thoughtful
    instructional leader.
  • In order to Be successful there must be a
    technology plan of action.
  • Example The Strategic Plan.

2002 MAKING TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS WORK FOR YOU
ISTE.
77
Research Data
0
  • There is an enormous amount of data supporting
    technology integration in the classroom.
  • International Society of Technology Education
    (ISTE) Standards
  • National Education Association NEA
  • Michigan Association for Computer Users in
    Learning (MACUL)

78
Too often the Technology itself Becomes More
important than the Curriculum Instruction
  • Sound Curriculum Instruction Decisions should
    be made and then the appropriate technology
    should follow.
  • We should Review Site Plans
  • Identify Existing Decision making Committees or
    other decision making groups.

79
Presentation References
  • Covey, S. (2004). The 8th habit From
    effectiveness to greatness. New York, NY
    Franklin Covey Co.
  • Downey, Steffy, English, Frase Poston (2004).
    The Three Minute Classroom Walk-Through.
  • Dufour, R., Dufour, R., Eaker, R. Many, T.
    (2006). Learning by Doing. Bloomington, IN
    Solution Tree.
  • Dufour, R., Dufour, R., Eaker, R., Karhanek.
    (2004). What ever it takes How professional
    learning communities respond when kids dont
    learn. Bloomington, Indiana Solution Tree
  • Dufour, R., Dufour, R., Eaker, R. (2002).
    Getting started Reculturing schools to become
    professional learning communities. Solution Tree
    Bloomington, Indiana.
  • Dufour, R. Eaker, R. (1998). Professional
    Learning Communities at Work Best Practices for
    Enhancing Student Achievement. Bloomington,
    Indiana Solution Tree.
  • Education Week,, (2002) Technology in Education,
    October 1st, 2003.
  • Fullan. (2008). The Six Secrets of Change.
  • Fullan, Hill, Crevola. (2006). Breakthrough.
    Prentice-Hall.
  • Gardner () Do Technology Based Lessons Meet the
    Needs of Student Learning Styles
  • Jackson, Anthony W Davis, Gayle (2000).
    Turning Points 2000 Educating Adolescents in the
    21st Century.
  • Marzano, R. (2006). Classroom Assessment and
    Grading that Work. ASCD Publications.

80
Presentation References
  • Marzano, R., Waters, T., McNulty, B. A. (2005).
    School Leadership that works From Research to
    Results.
  • National Association of State Boards of Education
    (2002)
  • McLaughlin, M., Talbert, J. (2001).
    Professional learning communities and the work of
    high school teaching. Chicago University of
    Chicago Press.
  • Sarason, S. B. (1996). Revisiting The culture of
    the school and the problem of change. New York
    Teachers College Press.
  • Souden, Mike (2003). Evolution of Standards
    Enhanced Information opportunities that
    technology provides. Taken on October 24, 2003,
    form www.macul.org
  • Stiggins, R. (2004). Student Involved Classroom
    Assessment 3rd Edition. Prentice Hall.

81
Website and Emailhttp//salina-int.dearbornschool
s.org/
  • Glenn Maleyko
  • Maleykg_at_dearborn.k12.mi.us
  • Kareem Naimi
  • Naimik_at_dearborn.k12.mi.us
  • Bob Attee
  • Attteer_at_dearborn.k12.mi.us
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