One Planet Packaging Powerpoints - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – One Planet Packaging Powerpoints PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3ce4b4-NGM5M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

One Planet Packaging Powerpoints

Description:

One Planet Packaging Powerpoints 1. An introduction to packaging 2. Packaging trends 3. Sustainability and the environment 4. Designing for sustainability – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:147
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 122
Provided by: wastewatc
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: One Planet Packaging Powerpoints


1
  • One Planet Packaging Powerpoints
  • 1. An introduction to packaging
  • 2. Packaging trends
  • 3. Sustainability and the environment
  • 4. Designing for sustainability
  • 5. Sustainable packaging
  • 6. Packaging materials life cycles
  • 7. Packaging policies and regulations
  • 8. Packaging materials
  • 9. Case study What is right-sizing?
  • 10. Functional performance tests

Index
2
An introduction to packaging
PowerPoint one Index
3
Origins of packaging
  • The first examples of packaging were natural
    objects shells, gourds and leaves used to
    contain food and drink so that it could be
    consumed in a place away from where it was
    obtained.

4
Packaging functions
  • protect
  • inform
  • contain
  • transport
  • preserve
  • display

5
Packaging categories
  • primary packaging
  • secondary packaging
  • transit packaging

6
Primary packaging
Package labelling refers to the graphics and text
that provide information about product contents,
and directions for handling and use
  • Primary packaging surrounds the product and
    features labelling.

7
Secondary packaging
  • Secondary packaging is the box or crate into
    which a number of primary packages are placed for
    ease of manual movement of products. Some
    secondary packaging is also used to display
    products.

8
Transit packaging
  • Transit packaging is the base pallet, strapping
    and wrapping used to bundle the boxes or crates
    for transport and distribution.

9
Shipping containers
  • Transit packaged products are placed in shipping
    containers for long-distance transportation and
    distribution.

10
Packaging manufacturing
  • About 65 of packaging used in the UK is
    produced in the UK. (The Packaging Federation,
    2010)

11
How has packaging changed?
12
Packaging trends
PowerPoint two Index
13
Trend
  • Mass of packaging per person in
  • UK 147 kg/year
  • Germany 158 kg/year
  • Netherlands 172 kg/year
  • France 162 kg/year
  • The total mass of packaging used in the UK and
    Europe is increasing.

14
Increasing packaging
  • Single-serve packaging and ready meals are
    convenient for consumers, but use more packaging.

15
Increasing packaging
  • Luxury packaging involves layers of packaging or
    the use of unusual packaging materials perceived
    to convey status.

16
Packaging and waste
  • Half of all the packaging produced ends up in
    our homes.
  • Primary packaging makes up 20 percent of all
    household solid waste.
  • Every year, more than 10 million tonnes of
    packaging are used in the UK.

17
Recycling packaging materials
More than one-third of the food packaging in an
average shopping trolley cannot be recycled.
  • Many materials used for packaging cannot easily
    be recycled, and others become contaminated by
    food residues and cannot be recycled.

18
Reducing packaging
  • Bottle manufacturers have redesigned milk
    bottles to be 65 percent lighter. This uses less
    glass and makes the product lighter and less
    expensive to transport.

19
Reducing packaging
  • Can manufacturers have redesigned steel cans to
    be 61 percent lighter, saving metals and making
    the product lighter and less expensive to
    transport.

20
Packaging and lifestyle
  • What is the relationship between the amount of
    packaging and lifestyle?

21
Waste-free packaging
  • Is it possible to develop practical and
    cost-effective packaging that is waste-free?

22
Sustainability and the environment
PowerPoint three Index
23
Sustainability
Sustainable communities are described as places
where people lead lives of quality and dignity
without damaging the ecological systems
responsible for clean air, safe water, healthy
foods, shelter and human health.
  • Sustainability is the goal of maintaining a
    human society over time in ways that are fair and
    just for all people and do not damage the
    environment and its biodiversity.

24
Sustainable development
The United Nations Environment and Development
Programme states that human well-being is central
to its efforts to promote sustainable development.
  • A plan for the development of communities that
    balances the importance of a vibrant economy and
    sustainability.

25
Weak sustainability
environment
society
economy
  • The three elements of sustainable development
    the environment, society and the economy are
    competing interests. The point where they come
    together represents sustainable development.

26
Weak sustainability
environment
society
economy
  • This model accepts that many aspects of
    development serve the economy, society or the
    environment alone. It suggests that technology
    can be a substitute for a damaged environment.

27
Strong sustainability
environment
society
economy
  • The environmental element of sustainable
    development is viewed as the common ground where
    society and the economy interact and develop.

28
Strong sustainability
environment
society
economy
  • Development cannot damage the environment a
    healthy environment is fundamental to a just and
    fair society and a vibrant economy now and in
    the future.

29
One planet living
The phrase one planet refers to the level of
natural resource use required for everyone on the
planet to have access to their fair share.
Today, a small number of people use the majority
of the earths resources.
  • WWF-UK and BioRegional developed 10 principles
    for one planet living that designers can use to
    plan places and products that promote sustainable
    development.

30
1. Zero carbon
How can packaging be zero carbon?
  • The activity must produce net zero carbon
    dioxide emissions. Net zero means that the
    activity produces no carbon dioxide, or takes
    measures to remove the carbon dioxide it produces.

31
2. Zero waste
How can packaging be zero waste?
  • All materials must be used cleanly and recycled
    cleanly in a continuous cycle or they must be
    composted to re-enter ecological cycles.

32
3. Sustainable transport
How can packaging achieve sustainable transport?
  • The movement of materials and products must be
    done in ways that are good for people and the
    environment.

33
4. Local and sustainable materials
What types of packaging can be produced using
local and sustainable materials?
  • Meet consumer demands by using materials that
    are locally sourced and use locally available
    technologies for recycling and reuse.

34
5. Local and sustainable food
What role can packaging play to promote local
and sustainable food?
  • Promote and consume foods that support regional
    agriculture and food industries, and minimise
    their use of non-renewable natural resources in
    the form of fossil fuels used for transport and
    fertilisers.

35
6. Sustainable water
What role does water play in packaging production
and recycling and how can it be sustainable?
  • Water use that promotes human health and
    prevents water pollution, depletion of fresh
    water, and harm to aquatic and marine ecosystems.

36
7. Natural habitats and wildlife
What role can packaging play in protecting and
restoring natural habitats and wildlife?
  • The harvesting or mining of natural resources,
    and the construction of transport routes,
    factories, warehouses and retail centres should
    not damage or degrade natural habitats or harm
    wildlife.

37
8. Culture and heritage
How can culture and heritage be used to improve
packaging?
  • Economic activities should honour and protect
    the culture and heritage of the communities they
    affect, and local knowledge should be used to
    make decisions.

38
9. Equity and fair trade
What role can packaging play in promoting equity
and fair trade?
  • Everyone involved in the development,
    distribution, sales and recycling of products
    must be treated and paid fairly and have
    opportunities for a dignified life.

39
10. Health and happiness
What role can packaging play in addressing
excessive consumption and promoting health and
happiness?
  • Beyond the consumption of goods and services to
    meet basic human needs, there is no correlation
    between consumption (wealth) and happiness.

40
Designing for sustainability
PowerPoint four Index
41
Designing for weak sustainability
Can you name a packaging material that achieves
weak sustainability?
  • Consider the economic, social and environmental
    strengths and weaknesses of their designs, but
    compromise to minimise potential environmental
    harm.

42
Designing for strong sustainability
Can you name a packaging material that achieves
strong sustainability?
  • Consider the economic, social and environmental
    strengths and weaknesses of their designs, but do
    not compromise and achieve environmental
    protection as a design priority.

43
Cyclic solar-safe design criteria
  • Practical design criteria for judging the
    strengths and weaknesses of a designs
    sustainability were developed by Edwin
    Datschefski in 1998.

44
Cyclic
The problem with most recyclable materials is
that their quality degrades when they are
recycled. What packaging materials could be
considered cyclic?
  • The product must be made from organic materials
    that can be recycled or composted repeatedly.

45
Solar
What are the challenges of creating packaging
that achieves the solar criteria? What role
can packaging designers play in improving the
solar performance of packaging?
  • The product must use solar or other renewable
    energy throughout is development, distribution,
    use and recycling.

46
Safe
Why are the safe criteria so important to
packaging?
  • The product must be nontoxic for humans and
    other organisms, and no toxic chemicals can be
    used in manufacturing or recycling.

47
Efficient
Why is the efficient criteria equally important
to both the environmental and economic aspects of
packaging?
  • The production and use of the product should
    require 90 less material, energy and water
    compared to similar products manufactured before
    1990.

48
Social
What are the challenges of creating packaging
that achieves the social criteria? What role
can packaging designers play in improving the
social performance of packaging?
  • The product, and the development and manufacture
    of the product, must not jeopardise the rights,
    health or livelihoods of individuals or
    communities.

49
Compare
50
Sustainable packaging
PowerPoint five Index
51
Sustainable packaging
  • Packaging that is functional, cost effective and
    meets sustainability principles or design
    criteria.

52
Precautionary principle
Name a packaging product you think would not have
been made if the designer had followed the
precautionary principle.
  • An obligation for designers to prove that a
    product, through its manufacture, use or disposal
    poses no negative consequences for people or the
    environment.

53
Strategies for sustainable packaging
54
Renewable and compostable materials
  • Examples
  • Bioplastics made from corn, potato, wheat, or
    dairy polymers
  • Paper and cardboard from sustainable managed
    forests
  • Cellulose film

55
Recycled and recyclable materials
  • Examples
  • Paper and cardboard made from recycled fibre or
    moulded pulp
  • Recycled and recyclable plastics like HDPE and PET

56
Design for reuse
  • Examples
  • Reusable and recyclable crates and pallets
  • Re-sealable plastic containers
  • Return system for customer refills

57
Design for recycling
  • Examples
  • Packaging made from a single material (including
    labels and closure system)
  • Packaging made from materials that are commonly
    collected for recycling
  • Packaging with prominent recycling symbols

58
No toxic inks, paints or adhesives
  • Examples
  • Print with inks that do not contain toxic
    compounds (volatile organic compounds VOCs)
  • Use paints and inks that do not contain heavy
    metals or other toxic compounds
  • Use adhesives that do not contain toxic compounds

59
No secondary packaging
  • Example
  • Use only primary packaging and transit packaging

60
Reduced material volume
  • Examples
  • Inflatable pouches to fill package voids
  • Refills in pouches
  • Lightweight bottles and cans

61
Challenges
  • What are the barriers that prevent packaging
    designers and manufacturers from adopting all of
    these strategies?

62
Packaging material life cycles
PowerPoint six Index
63
Packaging material life cycle
Stage 1 Designing
Stage 8 Disposing
Stage 2 Extracting
Stage 7 Using
Stage 3 Manufacturing
Stage 6 Retailing
Stage 4 Filling
Stage 5 Distributing
  • The process that describes how packaging
    materials are created, manufactured, used and
    disposed of, recycled or re-used. Each stage has
    potential economic, social and environmental
    costs and benefits.

64
Stage 1 Designing
  • What are the
  • economic
  • human, and
  • environmental
  • costs and benefits at this stage?

Why is this the most critical stage in
sustainable packaging?
  • The designer creates a plan for packaging that
    meets the functional requirements like cost and
    durability, as well as sustainable design
    principles or criteria.

65
Stage 2 Extracting
  • What are the
  • economic
  • human, and
  • environmental
  • costs and benefits at this stage?
  • The raw materials are harvested from renewable
    sources like forests, or mined from the earth, in
    the case of metals or oil-based plastics.

66
Stage 3 Manufacturing
  • What are the
  • economic
  • human, and
  • environmental
  • costs and benefits at this stage?
  • Machinery, energy and water are typically
    involved in the processes that turn raw materials
    like wood, aluminium and oil into packaging
    materials like paper, tin and plastic and then
    turn these materials into boxes, bottles, bags
    and other forms of packaging.

67
Stage 4 Filling
  • What are the
  • economic
  • human, and
  • environmental
  • costs and benefits at this stage?
  • Both machines and human labour are involved in
    placing products in primary packaging, placing
    primary packages in secondary packaging and
    stacking and securing secondary packaging on
    transit pallets.

68
Stage 5 Distributing
  • What are the
  • economic
  • human, and
  • environmental
  • costs and benefits at this stage?
  • When the products are packaged, they are moved
    into warehouses for storage and/or transported
    to the customer for use or retail. Some products
    require controlled storage environments, like
    refrigeration.

69
Stage 6 Retailing
  • What are the
  • economic
  • human, and
  • environmental
  • costs and benefits at this stage?
  • Most packaged products are sold through
    retailers. Products may have special storage and
    display requirements, like refrigeration, and may
    have a limited shelf life.

70
Stage 7 Using
  • What are the
  • economic
  • human, and
  • environmental
  • costs and benefits at this stage?
  • Once purchased by a consumer, packaging may
    provide short- or long-term storage for the
    product. It may feature directions for product
    use and package recycling.

71
Stage 8 Disposing
  • What are the
  • economic
  • human, and
  • environmental
  • costs and benefits at this stage?
  • When the packaging is no longer needed, it can
    be re-used, recycled, sent to landfill or
    incinerated for energy recovery.

72
Packaging policy and regulations
PowerPoint seven Index
73
Statutory policies
  • Statutory polices are required by law. The
    design stage is the most important stage for
    insuring compliance with regulations.

74
Code of practice
  • A code of practice is an agreed set of standards
    designers voluntarily use to develop packaging,
    and that companies follow when manufacturing
    packaging.

75
World Packaging Organisation
  • The WPO recognises that over packaging is bad
    for business and bad for the environment. They
    ask their members to voluntarily follow their
    sustainable packaging recommendations.

76
European Commission
  • The European Commission, introduced the Producer
    Responsibility Obligation in 1997 set an
    ambitious goal of recovering a minimum of 79 of
    all packaging materials by 2017.

77
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
  • Defra introduced a new waste strategy in 2011
    that encourages packaging designers and
    manufacturers to optimise packaging and maximise
    packaging recycling potential.

78
British Retailers Consortium
  • In 2009, the BTC introduced the on-pack
    recycling label designed to inform consumers
    about the likelihood that a particular item of
    packaging will be collected for recycling in
    their area.

79
Greenwash?
  • What responsibilities do packaging designers and
    manufacturers have to prove their claims of
    environmentally responsible packaging?

80
Packaging materials
PowerPoint eight Index
81
Materials
  • Most packing contains a number of different
    materials, although this may make it more
    difficult to recycle.
  • The most commonly used packaging materials in the
    UK are
  • paper and board (43)
  • plastic (20)
  • glass (19)
  • steel and aluminium (14)

82
Selecting the right material
  • Material selection is based on
  • technical properties (strength, flexibility,
    etc.)
  • fitness for purpose (moisture barrier,
    cushioning, etc.)
  • availability
  • manufacturing capability
  • cost
  • environmental impact
  • regulations

83
Paper and cardboard
  • Paper and cardboard are derived from trees. The
    extent to which the forests are properly managed
    affects the environmental sustainability of paper
    as a packaging material.

84
Paper and cardboard recycling
Paper and cardboard contaminated with food
residue like pizza boxes cannot by recycled.
They can be home composted.
  • Paper and cardboard cannot be recycled
    indefinitely. When paper is recycled the fibres
    get shorter. New material with longer fibre
    length must be added to recycled material to make
    office-quality paper.

85
Designing with paper
  • Consider
  • designs that use less paper or cardboard
  • designs that can be reused
  • using materials with high recycled content
  • using mechanical locking instead of staples or
    glue
  • labelling that states where the wood came from
    and how the forest was managed
  • labelling that informs consumers that the
    packaging can be recycled

86
Metals
  • The metals most commonly used for packaging are
    steel and aluminium. Both of these rely on
    environmentally destructive mining practices to
    obtain new materials.

87
Metal recycling
Recycling aluminium cans saves 95 percent of the
energy used to make aluminium cans from virgin
ore.
  • Aluminium and steel are infinitely recyclable,
    and do not loose their quality as a result of
    recycling.

88
Designing with metals
  • Consider
  • designs that use less metal cylindrical shapes
    with straight vertical sides use less material
  • designs that use thinner metals this reduces
    weight for transport
  • using metals made from recycled materials
  • labelling that informs consumers that the
    packaging can be recycled

89
Glass
It takes one tonne of water to produce one tonne
of glass.
  • Glass manufacturing is energy intensive and
    requires large volumes of water.

90
Glass recycling
When the demand for recycled glass is low, many
service providers use a single collection bin.
This low quality cullet is used as an aggregate
in bituminous concrete.
  • Glass can be recycled indefinitely, but it must
    be colour sorted to maximise its recycling
    potential. Because so many products in glass
    containers are imported into the UK, more bottles
    are recycled than are needed.

91
Designing with glass
  • Consider
  • designs that use less glass cylindrical shapes
    with straight vertical sides use less material
  • designs that use thinner glass this reduces
    weight for transport
  • a design that can be reused
  • a design made from recycled glass
  • use organic labels that burn off easily during
    recycling
  • labelling that informs consumers that the
    packaging can be recycled

92
Plastics
  • Plastics are a group of materials, typically
    made from petroleum-based compounds. They can
    also be made from organic materials like plant
    starch.

There are more than 50 different types of plastic
and hundreds of varieties.
93
Plastic recycling
  • An international system of coding is used to
    identify types of petroleum-based plastics for
    the purpose of recycling. SPI resin ID codes 1
    and 2 are most widely recyclable.
  • Bio-plastics can be composted, but not in home
    composters.

94
Designing with plastic
  • Consider
  • designs that use less plastic cylindrical
    shapes with straight vertical sides use less
    material
  • designs that use thinner plastic this
    reduces weight for transport
  • a design that can be reused
  • a design made from recycled plastic
    (SPI resin codes 1-2)
  • avoid coloured plastic (theyre more difficult to
    recycle)
  • labelling that informs consumers that the
    packaging can be recycled

95
Biodegradable materials
Ecocradle is a Styrafoam substitute corner
protector that is grown rather than manufactured.
Fungi are grown in a waste grain mixture and give
the material its unique structure.
  • Biodegradable packaging materials are typically
    made from agricultural waste by-products, such as
    grain husks.

Image from http//uo-gpdn.ning.com
96
Composting biodegradable materials
  • Biodegradable materials can be added to home
    compost piles, although some require industrial
    composting technologies that achieve higher
    temperatures.

97
Designing with biodegradable materials
  • Consider
  • designing a new biodegradable material
  • a design that uses biodegradable materials
  • labelling that informs consumers that the
    materials can be home composted

98
Other materials considerations
  • Packaging materials themselves are just one
    consideration. Other things to consider include
  • Use of composite materials
  • Packaging made from composite materials are more
    difficult to recycle
  • Other secondary materials
  • Packaging involves the use of adhesives, tapes,
    inks, coatings, etc. that all have sustainable
    alternatives
  • Packaging machines
  • Manufacturing packaging involves the
    construction of complex machines that use
    resources and energy

99
Consumer perspective
  • What role does sustainable packaging play in
    consumer choice?

100
i2ieurope case study
PowerPoint nine Index
101
Right-sizing
  • Right-sizing is a packaging design principle
    that seeks to reduce the amount of packaging,
    save money, and reduce the impact on the
    environment by designing packaging that is the
    right size for the product.

102
The product
  • An eco-product that provides light without the
    use of batteries. One minute of winding provides
    20 minutes of light.

103
Original primary packaging
Original primary packaging mass Plastic 23
g Paper 10 g Total 33 g
  • The product was placed in a clear plastic
    package, with a paper insert providing product
    information.

104
Original secondary packaging
Original secondary packaging mass Plastic 0
g Paper 524 g Total 524 g Tape 1460 mm
  • Twelve primary packaging units were placed in
    each secondary packaging box, which also
    functions as a point-of-sale display.

105
Original transit container
Original packaging mass per unit Total 76.67 g
  • 3,024 secondary packages are manual loose loaded
    into a lorry container.

106
Problems
24 lorries deliver 870,912 products
  • Inefficient use of container space
  • High cost for excessive packaging
  • Negative environmental impact because the plastic
    packaging was not recyclable

107
New primary packaging
New primary packaging mass Plastic 0 g Paper
53 g Total 53 g 20 g heavier than the original
primary package
  • Eliminate plastic and use only corrugated carton
  • Reduce the overall size of the primary packaging

108
New secondary packaging
New secondary packaging mass Plastic 0
g Paper 182 g Total 182 g Tape 290 mm 342 g
lighter than the original secondary package
  • In the new version twelve primary packaging
    units are placed in each smaller secondary
    packaging box, which also functions as a
    point-of-sale display.

109
New transit container
New packaging mass per unit Total 68.17 g 8.5
g lighter per unit
6,480 secondary packages are manual loose loaded
into a lorry container.
110
Solution
12 lorries deliver 933,120 units Compared
to 24 lorries delivering 870,912 units
  • Total packaging materials used is reduced.
  • All packaging materials can easily be recycled.
  • Reduced transport fuel use and cost.

111
Functional performance tests
PowerPoint ten Index
112
1. Drop
  • This test should assess the ruggedness of the
    secondary packaging and its ability to protect
    the primary packaging and product from damage.
  • It should simulate the effects of sorting
    machines, conveyors, and manual handling and
    stacking that may result in short, sharp vertical
    drops.

113
2. Inclined impact
  • This test should assess the ability of
    combination packaging to withstand side impacts,
    such as those associated with manual handling and
    sudden starts and stops during vehicle or train
    transit.

114
3. Pest prevention
  • This test should assess the ability of the
    packaging to prevent pest damage that may be
    caused by rodents, insects or micro-organisms to
    primary packaging or the product.

115
4. Compression strength
  • This test should simulate the temporary
    compression associated with stacking during
    transport and distribution.
  • .

116
5. Stack load
  • This test should assess the stability of the
    combination packaging and packaging adhesives
    under compression associated with long-term
    storage or warehousing.

117
6. Weathering
  • This test should assess the ability of
    combination packaging to withstand changes in
    temperature, moisture, and direct sunlight
    exposure associated with transport and storage.

118
7. Vibration
  • This test should assess the ability of packaging
    to withstand vibration associated with transport.

119
8. Disassembly
  • This test should assess the disassembly of
    combination packaging for the purpose of
    recycling the component materials.

120
9. Recyclability
  • This test should assess the sustainability of
    all the component materials used in the
    combination packaging.

121
10. Cost effectiveness
  • This test should assess the cost of the packing
    as a percentage of the cost of the product inside
    the packaging.
  • It should make an effort to estimate the direct
    costs that would be incurred over the life cycle
    of the combination packaging.
About PowerShow.com