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Major Trends

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Title: Major Trends


1
University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
January 2008
Major Trends Factors That Will Impact Your
Ability to Recruit Students, Raise Dollars, and
Market Your Institution Presented by Dr.
Robert A. Sevier Senior Vice President,
Strategy bob.sevier_at_stamats.com 800-553-8878,
ext. 5100
2
The Perfect Storm
  • A confluence of three gales
  • Changing demography
  • Rising cost to attend
  • Increased competition for students and donated
    dollars

3
The Marketplace
4
The marketplace continued
  • U.S. population 303,162,042
  • One birth every...................................
    ................................8 seconds
  • One death every...................................
    ............................11 seconds
  • One immigrant every......30 seconds
  • Net gain of one person every......................
    ......................13 seconds
  • Number of Americans who turn 60 each
    day....6,500
  • Number of high school students who drop out each
    day.. . 2,100 (/-)
  • States with the greatest growth in the next 10
    years
  • California Georgia
  • North Carolina Arizona
  • Florida Texas
  • Washington

5
Key Demographic Realities
  • Half the U.S. lives in 10 states CA, TX, NY, FL,
    IL, PA, OH, MI, NJ, and GA
  • CA, FL, and TX will have half the increase
    traditional-age students (California enrolls
    13.6 of all college students)
  • One-third lives in nine metro areas NY, LA,
    Chicago, Wash DC, SF, Philly, Boston, Detroit,
    Dallas
  • The youth population of IN, MA, MI, OH, MO, and
    PA will continue to decrease until about 2010
  • The Third Great American Migration
  • By 2025, 50 million people who now live in the
    North will move South
  • Dramatic increase in average age of people in the
    South
  • Significant strain on infrastructure in the South
  • Loss of tax base in the North
  • Decline in real estate value in

    the North (31 tipping point by state)

6
U.S. Population Growth by Ethnicity
400000
350000
300000
250000
(Number in Thousands)
Hispanic Caucasian Black Asian/Pacific
Islander American Indian
200000
150000
100000
50000
0
1997
2000
2005
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035
2040
2045
2050
(Year)
  • Minority population rising to about 50 of
    population by 2050
  • 76 of Asian Americans have college degrees
    (only 67 of whites, 9 of blacks,
  • and 7 of Hispanics have degrees)
  • Asians account for 26 of freshmen at MIT, 24
    at Stanford, 19 at Harvard,
  • 15 at the University of Chicago, 17 at
    Cornell. By 2010, gt50 UC schools

Sources U.S. Census Data, The College Board
7
Projected Change in H.S. Graduates to 2018
0
-16
-15
-21
-3
-20
4
-12
11
-6
-10
-13
-8
-14
-9
-10
-13
-6
-9
-2
48
-5
-2
-8
-8
-3
27
24
-8
9
-7
2
1
-3
3
-34
18
-1
26
1
2
-8
9
gt 20 11 to 20 0 to 10 Decreases
-2
23
-1
-1
18
-16
11
-11
Source Chronicle of Higher Education Almanac
2006-07
8
Projected Number of High School Graduates
Sources National Center for Education
Statistics
9
Actual and Projected Numbers in Public High
School Graduates Colorado
Source US Department of Education, NCES
10
UCCS Alumni
11
College Student Populations, 1997 2015
Of Color
1997
Of Color
2015
Source National Center for Education Statistics
12
Population Distribution by Ethnicity
13
Fastest Growing Occupations
  • 2008 2014
  • Network systems and data communications analyst
  • Physicians assistant
  • Computer software engineer
  • Computer systems engineer
  • Database administrator
  • Physical therapist
  • Medical researcher
  • Occupational therapist
  • Network and computer systems administrator
  • College instructor

Sources Business 2.0
14
Fastest Growing Occupations In Colorado Requiring
a Bachelors Degree or Higher (Top 10)
Source www.acinet..org
15
Jobs Offered to College Graduates
Sources College Graduate Recruitment Surveys
USA Today, National Association
of Colleges Employers
16
Stamats Prediction
  • There are six growth markets in higher education
  • Students of color
  • Adult students, including seniors
  • Commuter students
  • Part-time students
  • Women (of almost all ages)
  • International students together
  • The market for full-time residential students
    is declining and will
    continue to decline for
    at least a generation

17
The Publics
  • Publics
  • De facto privitization because of low public
    funding
  • More and more publics receive fewer and fewer
    public dollars
  • Dramatic increase in fundraising
  • Increasingly use terms historically used by
    privates
  • Effectively leverage athletics
  • Have large affinity groups
  • Compete more effectively on quality already
    winning on price
  • Rise in honors programs/honors experience
  • Segment, especially high academics and honors
  • Make significant marketing expenditures
  • In 2007, we received three brand marketing RFPs
    from publics for each one we received from a
    private
  • Two-year institutions increasingly offer 22 and
    college transfer

18
Globalization of Higher Education
  • Shanghais ranking of worlds top 100
    institutions includes 45 non-U.S. schools (U.S.
    percentage is declining slowly)
  • EU is streamlining education system and offering
    more and more programs in English, expanding
    commitment to the 3-year BA
  • Great Britain, Australia, and New Zealand (as
    well as Taiwan, Hong Kong, and India) are
    aggressively recruiting foreign students
  • In 2006, the number of international students
    enrolled in Australia increased by 5.2 to
    172,297
  • 14,755 Americans enrolled in British
    institutions 50 increase since 1997
  • China In 2006, 61,869 students from 169
    countries studied in China
  • Chinas transformation of 100 universities into
    world-classresearch institutions is a national
    priority
  • Drop in exceptional students from China and India
    studying in the
    U.S.

19
Number of International Students in the U.S.
  • 58 of international students are from Asia
  • India is No. 1 source of international students
  • India up 10, China up 8, Korea up 6

Source Institute of International Education,
Open Doors 2007
20
International Students in the U.S.
  • Top 12 countries of origin
  • India
  • China
  • Republic of Korea
  • Japan
  • Taiwan
  • Canada
  • Mexico
  • Turkey
  • Thailand
  • Germany
  • UK
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Top 10 places in U.S. for foreign students
  • USC 7,115
  • Columbia 5,937
  • NYU 5,827
  • U Illinois Champaign 5,685
  • Purdue (main campus) 5,581
  • UM Ann Arbor 5,429
  • U Texas Austin 5,303
  • UCLA 4,704
  • Harvard 4,514
  • Boston U 4,484
  • USC is the top host university California top

    host state
  • In 2005/2006 the net contribution to the

    U.S. economy by foreign students and their
    families
    was 14.4 billion

Source Institute of International Education
(Open Doors 2007)
21
Locales of International Students in the U.S.
Source Institute of International Education
(Open Doors 2007)
22
U.S. Students Abroad
  • Number of students studying abroad increased by
    8.5 to a total of 223,534
  • Spending less time overseas. Only 7 spent a year
    abroad 92 a semester or less
  • The top three major fields of study of Americans
    studying abroad are the social sciences, business
    and management, and humanities

Source Open Doors 2007
23
Stamats Prediction
  • Public institutions, particularly four-year
    regionals and two-years in or near urban areas,
    face unparalleled opportunities
  • We will continue to see an erosion of the U.S. as
    the worlds education leader
  • We will see an increase in the number of highly
    talented students from India, China, and other
    developing countries coming to the U.S.
  • Especially graduate students
  • We will see an increase in the number of
  • U.S. students attending schools abroad

24
Online Education
  • Some 75 of all institutions offer online courses
  • 2.6 million students enrolled online
  • Approx 125,000 students enrolled in online MBA
    programs at over 150 accredited schools (Bus 2.0)
  • Several institutions, including Concord
    Law
    School (owned by Kaplan) and
    Northwestern
    California University offer
    online JD degrees

25
For-Profit Institutions
  • Attend for-profit institutions
  • 9 of four-year students
  • 22 of two-year students
  • U of Phoenix is Americas biggest college
  • Stock increases over 2006
  • ITT stock up 78
  • DeVry up 55
  • Apollo Group 13

Source Eduventures
26
Apollo/The University of Phoenix (www.phoenix.edu)
  • More than 235,000 students
  • Average age 35
  • 30 of new students are 18-20
  • 54 women
  • 36 enrolled in business-related programs
  • 64 are undergraduates
  • 56 attend classes on campus (44 online)
  • 219 campuses and learning centers in 39 states,
    Puerto Rico, and Canada
  • Average class size 15
  • More than 12,000 adjuncts and about 250 full-time
    faculty (all who hold MA/S or Ph.D.s) 1,022
  • Phoenix offers associates, bachelors, and
    masters degrees in business, information
    technology, health care, and education

27
Stamats Prediction
  • From a students perspective, there is a growing
    blur between publics,
    privates, and for-profits
  • Students increasingly see colleges as a commodity
    (especially since so many colleges/universities
    look and sound alike)
  • The home-school movement is leading to a
    home-college movement
  • Aside from pure liberal arts colleges, most
    colleges/universities will blend brick and click
  • Many proprietary (tax-paying) institutions are
    legitimate players and will exert more influence
    in the HE community
  • Institutions that serve only full-time
    residential undergraduates will face an extremely
    difficult future unless they are well-branded
    and/or well-endowed

28
Students of Todayand Tomorrow
29
19-Year-Olds Who Start College This Fall
  • What Berlin wall?
  • Humvees, minus the artillery, have always been
    available to the public
  • They never rolled down a car window
  • Michael Moore has always been angry and funny
  • They have always drunk bottled water
  • General Motors has always been working on
    an electric
    car
  • Nelson Mandela has always been free and a
    force in South Africa

Source Beloits MINDSET LIST (blended)
30
Students continued
  • 65 of H. S. graduates go to college
  • 1 in 3 attend community colleges
  • Only 1 in 4 community college students complete a
    bachelors degree
  • 13 million students working on bachelors degrees
  • 57.4 are women 30.9 are of color
  • 20 have one foreign-born parent
  • 11 speak another language besides English at
    home
  • 50 begin their education at two-year
    institutions
  • 60 attend more than one institution 35 attend
    three or more before they graduate
  • 48 of freshmen drop/stop out of college at least
    once

Sources The College Board and 2006-07 Chronicle
of Higher Education Almanac
31
High School Hopes and Dreams
  • 10th graders expecting to get a four-year degree
  • 1990 59 2004 80
  • Percentage of students graduating from high
    school
    and entering college
  • 1990 60 2004 64
  • By the time a student is 24
  • One in three students from household with incomes
    of
    85,000 or above will have a degree
  • 1 in 17 from households with income below 35,377
  • 1 of 5 high school students in 2004 took at
    least one AP exam
  • 1 of 20, or 813,000, high school students took
    collegecourses

32
Todays High School Students
  • Strengths
  • Multitasking
  • Goal orientation
  • Positive attitude
  • Technically savvy
  • Collaboration
  • Weaknesses 
  • Distaste for menial work
  • Lack of skills for dealing with difficult people 
  • Impatient want it now 
  • Poorly prepared
  • Unrealistic expectations for near-term earnings
  • Immature

33
Students - continued
  • Increasingly cynical, fickle, and flighty
  • Rely heavily on first impressions
  • Very unlikely to go to a school their friends
    dont think is cool
  • Most visually sophisticated of any generation
  • Magazines
  • Movies
  • MTV
  • CDs - downloads
  • Web/Internet
  • Scanners, not readers

34
Reasons for Going to College
M W
  • To learn more about things that interest me 72.1
    80.6
  • To get training for a specific career 64.8
    72.7
  • To be able to get a better job 70.4
    70.4
  • To be able to make more money 71.9
    66.6
  • Gain a general education/appreciate ideas 57.8
    69.9
  • College has a good academic reputation
    52.45 61.4
  • Graduates get good jobs 46.1 51.8
  • A visit to campus 32.2 43.2
  • Wanted to go to a school about this size 31.2
    45.1
  • Offered financial assistance 30.7
    37.2

Reasons for Selecting a Specific School
Source Chronicle of Higher Education Almanac
2006-07
35
Students - continued
  • Majors of most interest to prospective
    students
  • Private-bound
  • Business (11)
  • Biology (10)
  • Pre-med (8)
  • Art (7)
  • Psychology (7)
  • Education (6)
  • Public-bound
  • Business (9)
  • Engineering (9)
  • Education (9)
  • Art (8)
  • Nursing (8)
  • Biology (8)
  • Fastest-growing majors
  • Network systems/data communications analyst
  • Physicians assistant
  • Medical records and health info mgt
  • Computer software engineers, application
  • The new, hot major Econ

Source The College Board and Stamats 2007
Seniors Spring TeensTALK
36
Students continued
  • Significant physical and emotional health issues
  • 1 in 5 colleges in U.S. has at least one suicide
    each year
  • Chronic fatigue and increasingly complex health
    problems
  • 25 of college students have little/no health
    insurance
  • Galloping psychology of entitlement ? Rise of
    narcissism
  • 49 (3.8 million) of full-time college students
    binge drink
  • 156,000 college students drop out each year
    because of alcohol issues
  • 1.8 million full-time college students (22.9
    meet criteria for
    substance abuse)
  • 85 of all crime problems are directly related to
    alcohol
  • 19.2 of college students do not drink alcohol
  • 3 in 10 college students clinically obese

Source Council for Substance Abuse and Addiction
37
Their Connected World
  • Technology is like a knife and fork to teens
  • Cell phones (69 have) not just for talking, but
    delivering content 39 say could not live
    without cell
  • Games, video, advertising, mobile Internet
  • Text messaging up, email down
  • 93 of youth and 94 of parents are online
  • 64 of online teenagers ages 12 to 17 engaging in
    at least one type of content creation (girls
    dominate)
  • Some 35 of all teen girls blog, compared with
    20 of online boys
  • 27 maintain their own personal Web page, up from
    22 in 2004
  • iPod The most perfectly named product in 25
    years
  • iTunes U (Stanford, Berkeley, and others)
  • Most plugged in, but least connected
  • INFOMania multitasking drops IQ by 10 points

38
Parents Role in College Choice
  • Todays parents are better informed about the
  • college-choice process and have higher
  • expectations (especially true for moms)
  • Look at themselves as partners with their
    children
  • Very interested in issues related to academic
    quality, access to
    faculty and facilities, and
    outcome data
  • Safety is of keen, but often undefined, interest
  • Concerned about cost, but cost is seldom the
    deal breaker
  • Plan to stay highly involved in their childs
    college experience
  • Look at choosing a college as a competitive sport
  • Expect colleges to keep their promises

Source Stamats 2006 ParentsTALK
39
What Parents Want to Know Most About You
Top choices from a list of 26 items
  • Faculty are good teachers/mentors
  • Program of interest to child is available
  • Safe campus
  • High academic quality
  • Graduates get good jobs
  • Known for its academics
  • Availability of financial aid
  • Availability of scholarships
  • Value (high quality/good price)
  • Reasonable cost tied with good technology
    resources

Source Stamats 2006 ParentsTALK
40
Stamats Prediction
  • This is the age of the never-satisfied student
    (and parent)
  • We can expect the parents role in decision on
    where to go and whether to stay to increase
    (parents as advocates)
  • More students will transfer more often
  • Start out at less expensive institutions and
    transfer to better-known institutions 35 go to
    three or more colleges/universities before they
    graduate (swirl)
  • Technology is the fabric of a teens social
    network and they expect a similar relationship
    with their college/university

41
Todays Adult Students
  • Only 16 of college students fit the traditional
    model age 18-22 years old, attending college
    full-time, and living on-campus
  • In fact, the traditional student is anything
    but traditional
  • 40 percent of todays students study part-time
  • 40 percent attend two-year institutions
  • 40 percent are aged 25 or older
  • 58 percent are aged 22 or older

42
Catalysts for Re-entry
  • Major life transition
  • Loss of employment/unemployed
  • Divorce
  • Death of spouse/significant other
  • Empty nest
  • Career change
  • Career advancement
  • Educational requirement for current position
  • Second or third career
  • Personal achievement/fulfillment

43
What Adult Students Seek
  • Flexibility On my schedule, not just when you
    want to teach.
  • Convenience In and out parking one-stop shop.
  • Credit for life experience Acknowledge what I
    have already learned through my professional
    experience.
  • Accelerated completion Time is money.
  • Valid learning experience Im not here for the
    social life.
  • Multiple learning alternatives Im open to
    online options.

44
Student Recruiting
45
Student recruiting continued
  • Privates spend about 2,073 to recruit a student
    publics about 455
  • Search saturation as more and more C/U go
    national dramatic
    increase in size in inquiry pool
  • Students applying to more schools than ever
    range from 5 to 7
    applications
  • 96 of colleges showed an increase in
    applications of 16-20 greatest
    increase among publics
  • More out of the blue apps coming from the Web
  • 57 of all college apps received online source
    codes increasingly untrackable
  • C/U cutting back on high school and home visits
  • Because of declining yield rates, many C/U are
    accepting more students who are less prepared
    academically
  • Publics Only about 22 of inquiring students
    applied
  • Privates 10.5 of inquiring students applied
  • Most sought-after The 20 who will go full-time,
    can pay
    at least a portion of their tuition, and plan
    to live in
    a dorm (declines about .1 a year)

Sources N-L, NACAC, Greentree Gazette
46
Most Important College-Choice Characteristics

Source Stamats 2007 Seniors/Spring TeensTALK
47
Recruiting Strategies Students Find Most Helpful
Source Stamats 2007 Seniors/Spring TeensTALK
48
Major Changes in the Funnel
  • Built on research
  • Segmented and customized to a much higher degree
  • Better management of digital and non-digital
    media (Web, print, telemarketing)
  • Messaging and channels are more
    combined/synergistic
  • Relationship between recruiting, financial aid,
    and retention will be even more important
  • Funnels will be built on solid image-building
    strategies, begin earlier, and run longer

49
Funnel continued
  • Even as the size of publications decrease, the
    number of publications in the funnel will
    continue to increase
  • Drive-to-Web
  • Academic viewbook and/or
    stronger divisionals
  • More user-friendly catalog and likely online
  • Expanded financial aid brochure
  • Outcomes pieces

These themes must also be expanded throughout
the funnel
50
Funnel continued
  • More whole systems approach
  • C/U are increasingly using technology to
  • Improve performance
  • Reduce recruiting costs
  • Target students with special or valued

    qualities/characteristics Affluence,
    academic talent,
    ethnic, or geographic
    diversity
  • Key technologies
  • Integration of search engine marketing, drive to
    Web (with engaging features), and direct
    marketing to track prospects through entire cycle
  • More sophisticated use of segmented postal and
    e-mail
  • Predictive modeling
  • Financial aid leveraging
  • Tuition price elasticity
  • Data mining will be the key skill of the next
    decade

51
Students and the Web
  • Spend 10 hours per week on the Web (more
    than TV)
  • Characteristics of third- and fourth-generation
    sites
  • Move from distributing info to dialogue
  • Content is much more user-friendly
  • More predictable layout, fewer unusual interfaces
  • Voracious users of content
  • Digital analogue interface
  • Prospects want instant and interactive (FedEx
    fast and Disney friendly)
  • Extremely high convenience quotient
  • To participate (chat rooms, blogs, journals,
    video, dialogue)
  • Financial aid calculators and online provisional
    acceptance

52
Importance of the Campus Visit
  • More mixing and matching
  • Big events
  • Smaller more customized events
  • Women in engineering
  • Less emphasis on overnights
  • More campus involvement
  • Greater role for faculty
  • More sizzle
  • Facilities and atmospherics
  • The money walk
  • Virtual tours
  • More special events directed at middle school and
    early high school

53
Role of Facilities in College Choice
  • A study by the Association for Higher Education
    Facilities Officers indicates that certain
    facilities appear to have a clear impact on
    students decisions on where to attend college
  • Students very/most interested in (top 5)
  • Facilities related to their major (73.6)
  • Library (56.6) as a study hall and portal, not
    repository
  • Sophisticated technology (50.9) often defined
    as wireless
  • Classrooms (49.8)
  • Residence halls (42.2)
  • Contrary to popular wisdom that places wellness
    centers and dining complexes at the top of the
    list, these facilities ranked lower

Source Chronicle of Higher Education, June 9,
2006
54
Green U
  • 427 college presidents signed the American
    College and University Presidents Climate
    Commitment and thereby promise to take inventory
    of all greenhouse gas emissions on their campus
    and develop a plan to become climate neutral
  • Colleges have gone way beyond recycling
  • Facilities (Green and Platinum Ithaca)
  • Curriculum (Green MBA at Dominican)
  • Alternative energy sources
  • Co-curricular activities
  • Research
  • Symposia
  • Environmental leadership
  • Five member schools of the Eco League
    (www.ecoleague.org)
  • Association for the Advancement of Sustainability
    in
    Higher Education

55
Stamats Prediction
  • Recruiting will become even more technical
  • Aid (both merit and need) will be even more
    important in the future
  • The schools best able to recruit students will be
    those that
  • Are near or in an urban area (edge cities)
  • Have a strong brand or are commodity buys
  • Have a price point in the middle of the perceived
    competitor set
  • Able to serve multiple types of students
  • Significant endowment
  • Differentiated and valued curriculum
  • Institutions at risk
  • Rural
  • Less well-known with uncertain value
  • More expensive without strong brand
  • Few cash reserves

56
Cost and Financial Aid
57
TuitionPrivate vs. Public
Source The College Board, 2006
58
UG Enrollment By Tuition 2006-2007
Percentage of Full-Time Undergraduates
59
Cost and financial aid continued
  • No longer simply willingness to pay increasingly
    the issue is ability to pay
  • Generally, by the time a student is a senior, the
    average family has saved about one-eighth of four
    years worth of tuition, room, and board
  • Public-bound 7,277
  • Private-bound 15,235
  • Shopping for the best financial aid package

Generally, students create a cohort of possible
schools based on cost and then choose from that
cohort based on other college-choice variables.
60
Tuition Discount Rates - 2006
  • N-L estimated average discount rate 33.4
  • N-L says From 1998-2005, the discount rate for
    C/U has fluctuated only 1.4 over the past five
    years
  • NACUBO (unweighted, unfunded)
  • 2005 30.9
  • 2006 33.1

Source Noel-Levitz, NACUBO, Lapovsky, CCCU
61
Grants Versus Loans, Percent Share of Total Aid,
1991-92 to 2005-06
Undergraduate Students
Loans 52
Percentage of Total Aid
Grants 42
62
Repayment of Loans
  • When asked how long it would take them to pay off
    their college loans, many students are taking the
    long view
  • 5 1 year or less
  • 15 2-3 years
  • 20 4-7 years
  • 21 8-10 years
  • 23 11 to 20 years
  • 16 More than 20 years

Source AllianceBernstein Investments College
Debt Crunch Survey
63
Smallest Scholarship You Would Apply for
Source Lunch-Money.com
64
Graduates Debt Load
  • Over the past decade, debt levels for undergrads
    have increased from 9,250 to 19,200 (a 108
    increase)
  • 25 of graduates had debt greater than 30,000
  • 62.4 public grads and 73.9 of private grads had
    debt
  • 88.5 of Pell grant recipients also had student
    loans
  • More than 66 of college students will take out
    one or more student loans
  • Graduates of professional schools owe an average
    of 93,000
  • Increased college debt impacts
  • Time to degree and graduation rates
  • Relationship of alumni to institution
  • 40 of students who elect not to pursue graduate
    education blame debt
  • Post-graduation decisions involving decision to
    enter work
    force, marry, buy a home, and size of family

Source The Project on Student Debt
65
Credit Card Debt
  • College students hold an average of three
    separate credit cards
  • Average student owes 2,200 in credit card debt.
    That figure jumps to 5,800 for graduate
    students
  • 31 carry a balance of 3,000 to 7,000 about
    10 owed more than 7,000
  • 25 of students rely on credit cards to help
    finance their education
  • 30 of college students give their parents a D
    or F for college financial planning

Source Young Money Partnership for Public
Service
66
Raising Money
67
Raising money continued
  • Middle-class asked to give more than 100 times a
    year
  • Gifts to HE amounted to 40.98 billion in 2006,
    up 9.8
  • Some 3 trillion will pass to the next generation
    over the next
  • two decades
  • 464 billionaires and 9.3 million millionaires in
    the U.S.
  • In 2007, more than 30 institutions involved in
    billion capital campaigns including UW, Florida,
    RPI, Brown, Michigan State, NYU
  • University of Chicago has a fundraising staff of
    250 Harvard has a staff of 620
  • Alumni give 27.6 of all donated dollars to an
    institution
  • Size of alumni gifts are up
  • Number of alumni giving is down

Sources BusinessWeek Council for Aid to
Education Fortune
68
Registered 501(c)(3) Organizations 1995-2006
Source Giving USA 2007
69
Stamats Prediction
  • This is an unprecedented time to raise money
  • No. 1 reason for not giving Reason wasnt
    compelling (no longer I wasnt asked)
  • Top 25 university in the middle of a 2 billion
    campaign and is using more than 200 different
    case statements
  • More customized receiving opportunities than
    ever before
  • Identify
  • Interview
  • Customize proposal
  • Ask

70
Tight Budgets
71
Budget continued
  • Administrators views of major problems facing
    their colleges
  • On too many campuses there are simply no
    unallocated dollars
  • Tuition revenue is flat
  • Discount rates are high
  • State support is flat
  • Fundraising is increasingly restricted
  • Item view as critical concern
  • Finances 52
  • Faculty 36
  • Recruiting
  • Tenure
  • Governance
  • Enrollment 27
  • Fundraising 27
  • Increasing diversity 24

72
The Rise of the Lobbyist
  • 336 private colleges spent 34.7 million in 2005,
    up from 29.4 million that 267 such institutions
    spent in 2004
  • 265 public four-year C/U spent 35.7 million in
    2005, up from 31.7 million that 233 such
    institutions spent in 2004
  • 80 community colleges spent 4.3 million in 2005,
    with 12 of them reporting expenditures of at
    least 100,000
  • Some expenditures
  • Johns Hopkins University led the way with
    1,020,000, up from the 620,000 it reported
    spending in 2004
  • Boston University followed with 920,000 in
    reported spending
  • The University of California system spent
    980,000 and the State University of New York
    System spent 870,000 (plus more for some of its
    individual campuses)

Sources Inside Higher Ed
73
Enlarged Role for Marketing
  • Marketing is increasingly tied to strategic
    planning
  • More interest in brand/reputation building
  • Integration of marketing across multiple
    departments
  • Rise of the marketing professional ? VPs for
    marketing
  • Coming from commercial world
  • Centralized marketing functions and (bigger)
    budgets to support
  • Brand building
  • Student recruiting
  • Fundraising
  • More data-oriented and more interested in mROI
  • Outcomes vs. output
  • Tuition price elasticity
  • Academic program marketability

74
Integrated Marketing Communication
Internal Communication
Brand Direct
Marketing Marketing

75
The UCCS Brand
What Audiences Value
What UCCS Stakeholders Value
76
Final Comments
  • HE faces unparalleled challenges and
    opportunities
  • To be successful you must have
  • An engaging vision
  • A strategic plan with a high degree of
    accountability
  • A keen understanding of and respect for the
    marketplace
  • A valid point of differentiation
  • A senior team that is committed to working
    together
  • Focus

77
Books by Bob Sevier
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