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Ray Bradbury

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Ray Bradbury, the author of more than 500 published literary works, was born in ... Ray Bradbury - Paris Voice 1990 #3 - Political Correctness ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Ray Bradbury


1
Ray Bradbury
2
  • Censorship reflects a societys lack of
    confidence in itself. Potter Stewart/Associate
    Justice of the
  • U.S Supreme Court (1915-1985)
  • Explain what this quote means to you and support
    your response with literature, current events,
    history, science, art, or personal experience.

3
  • Ray Bradbury, the author of more than 500
    published literary works, was born in Waukegan,
    Illinois, on August 22, 1920.

4
In 1934, when Bradbury was 14, the family moved
permanently to Los Angeles, California. He still
lives there
5
  • In his youth, Bradbury developed a love of magic
    and aspired to become a magician.
  • In 1937, at the age of 17, Bradbury became a
    member of the Los Angeles Science Fiction League,
    through which he published his first work, a
    short lived science fiction fan magazine.

6
Accomplishments
  • In addition to his numerous books and short
    stories, Bradbury wrote for years for both Alfred
    Hitchcock Presents and The Twilight Zone.

7
  • Designed the Spaceship Earth ride at Disney
    World's EPCOT Center.
  • Worked as a consultant on city engineering and
    rapid transit

8
Social Critic and Visionary
  • Fahrenheit 451 written in 1953 between the era
    of McCarthyism and the Cold War Evokes the
    integrity of the individual and a bygone era
  • Warns of the allurements and traps of a modern
    society
  • Anticipates technological advancements

9
  • Dystopian Novel
  • the dystopia became immensely popular during the
    1950s
  • writers protested against what they saw as the
    overwhelming tide of conformity and cultural
    emptiness
  • caused by mass-market television and other
    powerful forces in the postwar world.

10
Themes
  • ØCensorship
  • ØEntertainment
  • ØPolitical Correctness
  • ØHappiness
  • Nuclear War

11
1 - Censorship
  • Books are burned because they can lead to thought
    and discontent dangerous to a society devoted
    to happiness

12
FACT FACT FACT FACT FACT FACT FACT FACT
  • Ballantine Books originally published the novel
    in 1953, but in 1967 brought out a special
    edition to be sold to high schools. Without
    informing Bradbury or putting a note in the
    edition, the publisher modified seventy-five
    passages in the novel in order to eliminate words
    like hell, damn and abortion. The
    expurgated edition was sold for thirteen years
    before a friend of Bradburys alerted him to the
    problem. Bradbury demanded that Ballantine
    withdraw the version and replace it with the
    original. Ballantine agreed. The publicity
    generated by the expurgated version of Fahrenheit
    451 caused the American Library Associations
    Intellectual Freedom Committee to investigate
    other school books and use its considerable
    economic clout to warn publishers about
    expurgations and demand that any excised versions
    be clearly identified. (from www.trib.com)

13
Mayan Literature burned By the Spanish to get Rid
of their culture
14
China
  • In China, the first censorship law
  • was introduced in 300 AD. The
  • ancient view of censorship was
  • seen as a public service in the
  • best interest of the people. The
  • communist Chinese government
  • has a long history of silencing
  • any dissenting views with fear
  • tactics and violence. While this
  • type of censorship is not upheld
  • by China today, other modern
  • equivalences are. The internet is
  • widely censored in China
  • preventing its citizens from
  • participating in the exchange of
  • world wide ideas. The totally
  • free exchange of information has
  • never been enjoyed in Chinese
  • society.

15
(Historically it was carried out by governments
from 213 BC Qin Dynasty, Nazi Germany and to the
present day)
16
Present Day Censorship
  • On Sunday evening, members of the Harvest
    Assembly of God Church in Penn Township sing
    songsas they burn books, videos and CDs that
    they have judged offensive to their God.
  • Published in the Butler Eagle, March 26, 2001.

17
(No Transcript)
18
2 - Entertainment
  • The story likens entertainment to a drug or
    addiction and encourages drug taking avoid
    thinking and being unhappy. 

19
Better Entertainment
  • More More - People clamor for technology
    faster computers, faster connections to internet,
    computerized chat
  • rooms that enable us to speak to faceless
    strangers, more comprehensive cell phone
    networks, pagers, more
  • powerful cars, voice mail, palm pilots, etc.
    People seem petrified of wasting time.
  • Bradbury believed that the presence of fast cars,
    loud music, and a constant barrage of
    advertisements created a life
  • with far too much stimulation in which no one had
    the time or ability to concentrate. Further, he
    felt people regarded
  • the huge mass of published material as too
    overwhelming, leading to a society that read
    condensed books (very
  • popular at the time Bradbury was writing) rather
    than the real thing.

20
Entertainment
  • Television is a really dreadful influence on
    all of us. Don't ever look at local
  • television news again. It's all crap. There's no
    news, there's no information. It's negative,
  • negative, negative. You look at that, and you
    think the world is coming to an end.
  • Television is very dangerous. Because it repeats
    and repeats and repeats our disasters
  • instead of our triumphs.
  • Ray Bradbury - Paris Voice 1990

21
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22
3 - Political Correctness
  • Books are also banned because they offend
    minorities (which can be any group with some
    kind of common link)
  • Colored people dont like Little Black Sambo. 
    Burn it.  White people dont feel good about
    Uncle Toms Cabin.  Burn it.  Someones written a
    book on tobacco and cancer of the lungs?  The
    cigarette people are weeping?  Burn the book. 

23
Political Correctness
  • After World War II, Stalin did much the same
    thing in the Soviet Union, censoring materials
    that threatened Communism while supporting
    writers who depicted the government in a positive
    light.

24
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25
Under the leadership of Senator Joseph
McCarthy, an intellectual witch-hunt began to
seek out and eliminate
26
beneath the surface of Bradburys narrative is
the theme of nuclear war
27
(No Transcript)
28
Type of Literature
  • the science fiction genre has been used
    throughout history as a way for concerned writers
    to warn - if not prophecy - against forthcoming
    events.

29
Dystopian Literature
  • This dark sub-genre of science fiction is usually
    known as dystopian literature, and has become a
    popular literary mode in the twentieth century.
    The opposite of the Utopia, the term dystopia
    comes from the Greek word for a bad place, and is
    traditionally set in a harsh society

30
Dystopian
  • He was able to accurately depict the
    intellectually dangerous trends of his times,
    while making startling observations about the
    future.

31
As you read
  • What we find in this novel is that without books
    people are kept ignorant and unknowing, so much
    so that they are unaware even of their own
    history and governmental workings. Living with in
    this vacuum of information leaves people unable
    to question ANYTHING. As we read Fahrenheit 451
    reflect on what you have learned about our own
    history of censorship and more importantly the
    current threats of censorship.

32
  • WRITING POINT
  • List three reasons if you had power over people
    why their literacy could threaten your power.
  • DISCUSSION POINT
  • How is knowledge power? How do we benefit from
    ideas and learning different points of view?
  • DISCUSSION POINT
  • Why would those in control of a society want to
    suppress knowledge? Why are ideas dangerous?
  • DISCUSSION POINT
  • How do books represent us (mankind)?
  • DISCUSSION POINT
  • Is there an idea you would be willing to die for?
  • 33

Ray
33
  • Why would those in control of a society want to
    suppress knowledge? Why are ideas dangerous?
  • Provide examples in todays society in which this
    has happened. What are/were they trying to
    suppress? What are/were the consequences of
    these actions?

34
  • Discuss the role of family in the characters
    lives, particularly in relation to the tv parlor
    families, and their nature and function. How
    can this view of family be related to todays
    society? What fear did Bradbury have for the role
    of family life in the future, and what aspects
    have come true? Provide specific examples from
    literature, current events, history, or personal
    experience.

35
  • What messages or themes is Bradbury trying to
    impart on his audience? What things in society
    is he commenting on? Choose one of these
    messages/themes and discuss how they are visible
    in todays society.
  • Provide specific examples from current events,
    literature, history, science, or personal
    experience.
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