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Educating For Careers

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Title: Educating For Careers


1

Educating For Careers
T h e C a l i f o r n I a C a r e e r
P a t h w a y s C o n s o r t i a A
n a h e i m , C a l i f o r n i a
How Does Your California Career Education Program
Affect the California Economy?
February 15, 2005
2
California Tech Prep Industry
Sector Manufacturing and Product Development 3
year study and report Cliff Monroe - Mfg. Grant
Director, CETA Director Rendee Doré - StRUT
Grant Director, CETA Director
3
  • Presentation Agenda
  • Grant deliverables
  • Status of Manufacturing Education
  • New Technology programs
  • New directions for Technology Education
  • Regional and state economic status affects on
    educational programs
    Manufacturing cause and effect
  • Regional and state technology education status
  • 21st Century technology career needs
    High Tech Industry definition
  • Technology Education rebirth solutions
    Teach to industry needs


4
How Does Your California Career Education Program
Affect the California Economy?

or How Does the California Economy affect
your California Career Education Program ?
5
The economy in Silicon Valley has affected
  • School budgets reduced
  • Cutting high school elective programs
  • Cutting community college technology classes and
    entire programs
  • Lack of jobs reduces student interest
  • Manufacturing is perceived as out
  • Health care, nano-tech, bio-tech, info-tech are
    perceived as in
  • Career pathways become unclear


6
  • Presentation Objectives
  • Regional and state economic status
    Manufacturing cause and effect
  • Regional and state technology education status
  • 21st Century technology career needs High
    Tech Industry definition
  • Technology Education rebirth solutions Teach to
    the needs


7
Statistical references Joint Venture Silicon
Valley 2005 Index Released January 27, 2005
San Jose Mercury News
8
(No Transcript)
9
Regional Trend Indicator
The 2005 Index shows that Silicon Valley is
experiencing job losses and economic stress, as
well as gains in income, productivity,
entrepreneurship and new investments in
innovation. In recent years, how we grow has
changed, raising serious questions about how well
people and communities are prepared for the
regions high-productivity, high-innovation
economy.
10
Regional Trend Indicator
  • Jobs losses / gains
  • While industry cluster employment fell by more
    than 3, jobs grew approximately 2 in business
    services, construction and health care.
  • Creation of new firms
  • While jobs continued to decline, the level
    entrepreneurship and investments in innovation
    increased. The region experienced a net gain of
    about 23,800 new companies between 2000 and
    2002. The average size of new firms was seven
    employees during this time.

11
Regional Trend Indicator
  • The reality today is that many residents are not
    prepared to participate in this economy.
  • A high percentage of Software (70),
    Semiconductor (58) and Computer and
    Communications Hardware (57) industry cluster
    jobs are in high-skilled design occupations.

12
California Economy
  • The Milken Institute August 22, 2002
    (www.milkeninstitute.org)
  • Manufacturing is an economically and
    strategically vital component of Californias
    modern economy, employing 1.9 million people.
  • An additional 3.8 million jobs in other sectors
    are tied back to manufacturing.
  • High-tech manufacturing is the strongest sector
    in California.
  • The biggest manufacturing sectors in California
    are electronic equipment firms, followed by
    industrial machinery, instruments and chemicals.

13
  • Why Manufacturing Matters National Review
    12/8/03
  • The U.S. is losing its manufacturing capacity at
    a dangerous rate
  • This year the U.S. will import almost 400
    billion more than it exports effecting future
    U.S. economic growth
  • U.S. has lost 2.7 million manufacturing jobs
    since 2000
  • Each 1 Manufacturing looses another 1.43 in
    related manufacturing and business services (ie.
    finance, construction, transportation) is lost
  • U.S.-based manufacturers are responsible for
    two-thirds of all private Research and
    Development done in the U.S. (new products, new
    production, new jobs)

14
  • U.S.-based manufacturers move offshore, most move
    their RD, as well.
  • Manufacturing provides 1/5 of the total gross
    product of the Carolinas.
  • Manufacturers pay 30-40 of all corporate taxes
    collected by the federal, state, and local
    governments.
  • Current decline in state and local revenues can
    be traced largely to decline of U.S.
    Manufacturing.
  • Manufacturing matters to the U.S. for it helps
    produce the taxes we pay, the jobs we need, the
    goods we consume, and the weapons we use for our
    national defense.

15
USA Manufacturing Model 20th Century
Raw Materials
Power Fuel
Taxes Jobs
Taxes Jobs
Tools
Business
Parts
Taxes
Products
Manufacturing
Machines
Wholesale Profits
Business Services
Info Svs
Transportation
Jobs
School/Tng ITE, Business
Service Industries
Retail Profits
1.
Strong Local Community
16
Global Manufacturing Model 21st Century
Foreign Manufacturing
Products
Wholesale Profits
Power Fuel
Raw Materials
Tools
Business
Manufacturing
Taxes
Parts
Info Svs
Transportation
Machines
Business Services
Jobs
School/Tng ITE, Business
Import Tariffs
Service Industries
Retail Profits
2.
Reduced Local Community
17
Global Manufacturing Model 21st Century
Products
Foreign Manufacturing
Wholesale Profits
Power Fuel
Raw Materials
Diplomacy, Wars, Quarantine…
Tools
Business
Manufacturing
Taxes
Parts
Info Svs
Transportation
Machines
Business Services
Jobs
School/Tng ITE, Business
Import Tariffs
3.
Service Industries
Retail Profits
Reduced Local Community
18
Global Manufacturing Model 21st Century
Foreign Manufacturing
Products
?
Power Fuel
Raw Materials
Diplomacy, Wars, Quarantine…
Tools
Business
Taxes
Parts
Manufacturing
Machines
Info Svs
Business Services
Jobs
School/Tng ITE, Business
4.
Service Industries
Retail Profits
Local Community
19
Silicon Valley Taxes Decline
  • SV city revenues declined 20.. Sales tax
    revenue declined 22, 0ther taxes and other
    revenue resources declined by 14 and 27,
    respectively. These categories include sales and
    use tax, transportation taxes, transient lodging
    taxes, business license fees, other nonproperty
    taxes and franchise taxes.
  • Page 38 of Joint Venture Silicon Valley 2005
    Index of Silicon Valley report

20
Manufacturing Process Outsource vs. Regional
Development
Outsource
Outsource
Outsource
Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley
21
  • Presentation Objectives
  • Regional and state economic status
    Manufacturing cause and effect
  • Regional and state technology education status
  • 21st Century technology career needs High
    Tech Industry definition
  • Technology Education rebirth solutions Teach to
    the needs


22
What is the future of Manufacturing Education in
California?
  • Fact California Leads the Nation in High-Tech
    Employment
  • Fact Manufacturing Matters to the U.S. Economy
    Security
  • Fact Students are not interested in
    engineering/manufacturing
  • Fact California has lost much of our Industrial
    Technology Education
  • What is the future?

23
Future Workforce Gap Crisis
1996
2010
1999
2001
2004
Need for High Tech Workforce Engineers
Technicians
Demand
Crisis
Supply
  • over 50 of engineers and designers are over 55
    yrs. old
  • 9 decline in sign-up for engineering degrees
  • 80 of University advanced degrees are foreign
    students
  • over 80 reduction in tech courses in high
    schools

24
Santa Clara County Technology Education Status
The April 2002 White Paper Report
www.svstrut.org
Research Committee Dr. Seth Bates
San Jose State Univ. Industrial Tech. Ed. Rendee
Doré Mission College StRUT Grant Director Ruth
Madalena Workforce Silicon Valley David
McCready Industrial Tech. Instructor
(ret.) Cliff Monroe Mission College Technology
Division
25
Decline of Technology Education
School District Instructors
1970 Instructors 2002 Campbell Union H/S
District 18 6 East Side Union H/S District
57 8 Fremont Union H/S District
25 2 Gilroy Unified 4 2 Los
GatosSaratoga Joint Union 8 2 Metropolitan
Education N/A 8 Milpitas
Unified 10 2 Morgan Hill
Unified 5 1 Mt. View-Los Altos
Union ? 0 Palo Alto Unified ? 3 S
an Jose Unified 25 data not
available Santa Clara Unified 20 3 44
SV High Schools 172 37
26
Decline of Technology Education
Silicon Valley 2002
Subject Sections Laboratories Electr
onics Tech 28 8 Drafting
Tech 39 16 Metals Tech 16
5 Wood Tech 35 13 Auto
Tech 45 13 Computer Tech 16 10
Manufacturing Tech 7 2 Engineering
Tech 20 5 2002 totals 206
72
27
Decline of Technology Education
Silicon Valley 2002
Subject Sections Laboratories Electr
onics Tech 28 8 Drafting
Tech 39 16 Metals Tech 16
5 Wood Tech 35 13 Auto
Tech 45 13 Computer Tech 16 10
Manufacturing Tech 7 2 Engineering
Tech 20 5 2002 totals 206
72 1970 totals (approx) 860 172
28
Decline of Technology Education
  • Number of Technology Educated Students…
  • in 1970 - 860 sections 21,500 students
    annually
  • in 2002 - 206 sections 5,150 students
  • 16,350
    not technology
  • trained annually

Urgency of Involvement
29
  • Presentation Objectives
  • Regional and state economic status
    Manufacturing cause and effect
  • Regional and state technology education status
  • 21st Century technology career needs High
    Tech Industry definition
  • Technology Education rebirth solutions Teach to
    the regional industry needs


30
National Association of Manufacturers
www.nam.org May, 2003 The Skills Gap
Manufacturers Confront Persistent Skills
Shortages in an Uncertain Economy report. The
study revealed that more than 80 percent of the
surveyed manufacturers reported a moderate to
serious shortage of qualified job applicants
even though manufacturing was suffering serious
layoffs. In sum, what manufacturing is facing is
not a lack of employees, but a shortfall of
highly qualified employees with specific
educational backgrounds and skills.
31
Semiconductor Equipment Materials International
  • Workforce Development Institute called High Tech
    U
  • 4 day education program sponsored by industry to
    place 30 high school students in the high tech
    industry environment to create an industry
    awareness and promote post-secondary technology
    education.
  • 32 hour curriculum
  • Team Building
  • Industry Economics
  • Math Statistics
  • Atoms Materials
  • Industry Tours
  • Semi Web Site use
  • Patterning Etch
  • Basic Intermediate Electronics
  • Future of Technology
  • Diffusion
  • Technology Testing
  • Gates Review
  • Human Calculator (how gates work)
  • University Microprocess Engineering tour
  • Working in Industry Panel
  • Educational Pathways
  • Job Interview Preparation/Techniques
  • Mock Interviews
  • Next Steps

32
  • 1. Manufacturers in the United States are
    innovative, productive and efficient, but face
    challenges
  • Global competitive pressures
  • product design, productivity, flexibility,
    quality and responsiveness to customer needs
  • high premium on the skills, morale and commitment
    of workers
  • Relentless advances in technology
  • Todays manufacturing jobs are technology jobs,
    and employees at all levels must have the wide
    range of skills
  • Demographic shifts
  • Baby Boom generation will retire within the
    next 15 to 20 years
  • Currently, the only source of new skilled workers
    is from immigration.
  • Projected need for 10 million new skilled workers
    by 2020.
  • Looming shortage of highly skilled, technically
    competent employees

33
2. American Youth Are Turned Off by Modern
Manufacturing Youth response …image was found
to be heavily loaded with negative connotations
and universally tied to an old stereotype of the
assembly line, as well as perceived to be in a
state of decline. serving a life
sentence, on a chain gang, slave to the
line, robot Adult response just have no
idea of manufacturings contribution to the
American economy. Career choices …and as a
result, they do not plan to pursue careers in
manufacturing.
34
3. Our Education System Is a Weak Link US
educational system exacerbates the negative
perception of manufacturing, because it is out
of step with the career opportunities emerging
for young people in todays economy, including
those in manufacturing. The United States sends
more than two-thirds of its high-school graduates
go to college, but half of them drop out. The
educational system fails to engage these students
and help them enter alternative post-secondary
programs. For those who do graduate, one-third
fail to find employment requiring a four-year
degree. Meanwhile, many well-paid and rapidly
increasing manufacturing jobs remain unfilled,
including those requiring two-and four-year
technical degrees or short-term skill
certificates.
35
  • 4. Our Education System Is a Weak Link…
  • 66 US HS grads go to college
  • 50 of them drop out 33 of HS grads complete
    college
  • 33 of college grads fail to find employment
    requiring a 4 yr degree 7 of HS grads are
    employed in jobs requiring a 4 yr. degree

93 of high school graduates do not find
employment requiring a 4 year degree
36
  • 5. The reality of manufacturing is vastly
    different from its image. Manufacturing is
  • High-tech innovation, exciting, varied careers
  • 25 of the nations total economic output
  • Every 1 million in manufacturing sales supports
    8 jobs in manufacturing and 6 in other, allied
    sectors
  • Manufacturing averaged 54,000 in total
    compensation in 2000 20 higher than the
    average compensation for all American workers
  • 83.7 of manufacturing employees receive health
    benefits from their employers, more than any
    other sector except government

37
  • 6. The Challenges to attract a new generation of
    manufacturing employees
  • Manufacturing is severely challenged by an old,
    negative image
  • An education and training system that does not
    understand or promote careers in manufacturing
  • Public policies that are not supportive of a
    robust manufacturing sector.

38
  • Presentation Objectives
  • Regional and state economic status
    Manufacturing cause and effect
  • Regional and state technology education status
  • 21st Century technology career needs High
    Tech Industry definition
  • Technology Education rebirth solutions Teach to
    the regional industry needs


39
What does Manufacturing Education look like for
the 21st Century?
  • Techademic1 Courses
  • Symbolic-analytic with a focus on high tech
    subjects
  • Research, design, manufacturing process and
    engineering
  • Analyzing, manipulating and communicating through
    numbers, shapes, words, ideas
  • Minimum associate college degree soon to be
    bachelor degree

1. A term that represents the skills and
knowledge of a technology curriculum integrated
with the scholarship of traditional academic
subjects.
40
  • 2. College-Prep Curriculum
  • Application-based academics, ie. Integrated
    math, science, physics, communications (written
    and oral)
  • U.C. A-G accreditation
  • Project-focused Techacademics, ie. Flight,
    electronics, ecology, product development,
    robotics, bridge construction, photo
    lithography, materials etching…

41
  • 3. Engineering/Technology High School course
  • Fields of technology
  • Electronics, mechanics, aviation,
    micromaterials, civil structures, aerospace,
    computer technology, robotics, information,
    environmental…etc.
  • Integrated academics
  • Math, chemistry, physics, communications
  • SCANS skills…
  • Research
  • Teamwork
  • Problem solving
  • Communicate clearly written and oral

42
4. Engineering/Technology High School course
genealogy
43
5. Engineering/Technology High School course The
course
Engineering/Technology
6. Computer Technology High School course The
course
  • Free computers for the school
  • Computer maintenance program for the school
  • E-waste recycling program for the environment

Computer Technology StRUT (Students Recycling
Used Technology)
44
TOP 10 SKILLS FOR THE FUTURE…
45
The top 10 skills 1. Work ethic, including
self-motivation and time management. 2. Physical
skills, e.g., maintaining one's health and good
appearance. 3. Verbal communication, including
one-on-one and in a group. 4. Written
communication, including editing and proofing
one's work. 5. Working directly with people,
relationship building, and team work. 6.
Influencing people, including effective
salesmanship and leadership. 7. Gathering
information through various media and keeping it
organized. 8. Using quantitative tools, e.g.,
statistics, graphs, or spreadsheets. 9. Asking
and answering the right questions, evaluating
information, and applying knowledge. 10.
Solving problems, including identifying problems,
developing possible solutions, and launching
solutions. http//www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN
/1580085245/thefuturistbooks
46
Engineering/Technology Course access and use
  • Engineering/Technology Brochure
  • Students Recycling Used Technology Brochure

47
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48
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49
What is the future of Manufacturing Education in
California?
  • Fact The U.S. is losing its manufacturing
    capacity at a dangerous rate
  • Fact Manufacturing Matters to the U.S. Economy
  • Fact California has lost much of our Industrial
    Technology Education
  • Fact California Education is focusing on
    academics and college prep
  • Manufacturing Future… Engineering/Technology
    StRUT

50
Cliff Monroe - Mfg. Grant Director, CETA
Director Rendee Doré - StRUT Grant Director,
CETA Director Mission College, Santa Clara 408
855-5349
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