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Earth Science & Applications from Space

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Earth Science & Applications from Space Exploring our Planet for the Benefit of Society Strategic Roadmap Committee #9 Interim Status Report April 21, 2005 – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Earth Science & Applications from Space


1
Earth Science Applications from
Space Exploring our Planet for the Benefit of
Society Strategic Roadmap Committee 9 Interim
Status Report April 21, 2005
2
(No Transcript)
3
Presidential Initiatives and Directives
  • Climate Change Research (June 2001)
  • Climate Change Science Program (CCSP)
  • Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP)
  • Global Earth Observation (July 2003)
  • U.S. Integrated Earth Observation System (IEOS)
    Strategic Plan
  • Provides a coherent overarching strategy to
    connect previously disjointed efforts
  • Provides compelling rationale for societal,
    scientific, and economic imperatives
  • Recommends and five specific near-term
    opportunities for investment
  • U.S. participation in the International Global
    Earth Observing System
  • of Systems (GEOSS)
  • Vision for Space Exploration (January 2004)
  • Collaborative Oceans Research (December 2004)
  • Earth Science and Applications form Space is the
    only NASA Strategic Roadmap that addresses NASAs
    all of these Presidential commitments

4
National Goals for Space Exploration
ADVANCE U.S. SCIENTIFIC, SECURITY, AND ECONOMIC
INTERESTS THROUGH A ROBUST SPACE EXPLORATION
PROGRAM
  • Implement a sustained and affordable human and
    robotic program to explore the solar system and
    beyond.
  • Extend human presence across the solar system,
    starting with a human return to the Moon by the
    year 2020, in preparation for human exploration
    of Mars and other destinations.
  • Develop the innovative technologies, knowledge,
    and infrastructures both to explore and to
    support decisions about the destinations for
    human exploration.
  • Promote international and commercial
    participation in exploration to further U.S.
    scientific, security, and economic interests.
  • Study the Earth system from space and develop new
    space-based and related capabilities for this
    purpose.

Added in The New Age of Exploration to
address other Presidential initiatives and
directives not covered in the Vision for Space
Exploration
5
Study the Earth system from space and develop new
space-based and related capabilities for this
purpose.
Advance scientific knowledge of the Earth system
through space-based observation, assimilation of
new observations, and development and deployment
of enabling technologies, systems, and
capabilities, including those with the potential
to improve future operational systems.
1960s-1980s
1980s-2000s
2005-2015
2015-2025
2025 Beyond
Demonstrating scientific utility technological
feasibility of satellite remote sensing
Earth System Science concept EOS
Interdisciplinary research
Expanding our view of Earth and reach into society
Creating a nervous system for Planet Earth
Comprehensive observing and modeling of the Earth
system
6
Conceptual Roadmap
2005-2015
2015-2025
2025 Beyond
Expand our view of Earth and reach into society
Create a nervous system for Planet Earth
Comprehensively observe and model the Earth system
Answer key science questions Couple Earth system
models
Extend the 4-D view of the Earth via higher
orbits active sensing Connect constellations of
satellites in a sensorweb Employ sensorweb
observations in a modelweb of the Earth
system Enable advanced data mining, data fusion,
visualization of NASA data by others
Operational, interconnected space and Earth-based
monitoring system with mature, reliable
cyber-infrastructure National/international
scale, operated by other public private sector
organizations, and evolved with NASA research
technology Expanded to other planets by NASA
Add key missing pieces of observing capability
(in IEOS/ GEOSS context) Secure research-to-
operations transitions Link data sets models to
decision support systems
7
Roadmap Achievements
  • The strategic roadmap compelling questions,
    objectives, anticipated achievements, and
    decisions points, in decadal phases

8
Unique Aspects of Earth Science Applications
  • Only Strategic Roadmap that directly responds to
    multiple Presidential Initiatives and Policy
    Directives
  • Fascinating science with highly beneficial
    results
  • Benefits accrue in two ways
  • From a set of investigation systems
  • Traceable to Strategic Roadmap Scientific
    Objectives
  • That trace to compelling science questions
  • From integration of investigation systems into
    National (and International) systems of systems
  • Traceable to Strategic Roadmap Integration
    Objectives
  • Capability emerges through the integrated results
    of multiple investigations

9
Framework for Strategic Plan
  • Discover, Understand, Inform - The vantage point
    of space provides a unique opportunity to
    understand the underlying scientific and
    engineering principles behind Earth as a system,
    to answer sustainability and quality of life
    questions on Earth and elsewhere in Solar System
    and the Universe
  • Understanding Earth as a system requires
    knowledge of the the processes that control the
    Earth environment, how they are changing, and
    what those changes mean in the long term
  • Exploration and Discovery Enabling new
    investigations and insight by exploring unknown
    aspects of the Earth system
  • Continuous Awareness Enhancing process
    understanding and the capacity to observe and
    model key dynamic phenomena
  • Maintaining Perspectives Developing capabilities
    to make critical observational records across
    multiple timescales

10
Compelling Questions
  • Why Does the Earth Support Abundant Life?
  • How does Earth's abundant life influence and
    respond to changing planetary processes?
  • What controls the availability of water on the
    planet?
  • How does the atmosphere protect and sustain us?
  • How are our weather and climate evolving?
  • How stable is the solid Earth?
  • What role do we as humans play in driving changes
    in the Earth system?

11
Scientific Objective(s)
  • Explore and develop a predictive understanding of
    the Earth as a system of interacting natural and
    human systems, including
  • Life biogeochemical cycles and the distribution
    and processes of life within Earths ecosystems
  • Water the storage, distribution, and transport
    of water in all its forms
  • Climate/ Weather the Earth's weather and
    climate, and its future condition
  • Atmospheric Composition the sources, sinks, and
    transformations of aerosols and atmospheric
    chemical species
  • Solid Earth the variability of the Solid Earth

12
Accomplishment/ Timeline Development Process
  • Measurements concepts identified
  • Based on Earth-Sun System Potential Roadmap and
    Mission Development Activities Document (Dec. 23,
    2004)
  • Additional concepts identified through the
    subcommittees
  • Notional implementation approaches identified and
    missions categorized into four cost-based classes
  • Small (under 200M), medium (200-400M), large
    (400-600M), and flagship (over 600M)
  • Subcommittees prioritized measurement concepts
  • Identified expected accomplishments
  • Staff team organized and time-ordered measurement
    concepts on sample timeline based on
  • Scientific prioritization from subcommittees
  • Assessment of technology and measurement maturity
  • Cluster concept group complementary
    investigations for synergistic science
  • Order (sequence) of clusters is based on
    estimation of maturity in each science area
  • Uniform level of investment
  • Staff team summarized decadal accomplishments
    based on timeline
  • Further work is needed timeline is
    representative first cut
  • Need broader science community input on
    measurement and investment priorities, such as
    through the ongoing NRC Decadal Survey
  • Need to assess and vet the assumed available
    level of investment -- ensuring adequate
    investments in modeling, information systems,
    etc.
  • Need to conduct mission studies to refine
    technology readiness, cost, and cost phasing
    estimates, and eliminate redundancies

13
Prioritization Criteria Scientific Measurement
  • Advances Science
  • Significance of the potential to make a major
    scientific breakthrough
  • Supports NASAs overall mission
  • Supports Decision-makers
  • Fulfilling NASAs responsibilities of CCSP and
    IEOS
  • Addressing national applications
  • Potential to reduce uncertainty in predictions
  • Benefits society
  • Social importance of the science question
    addressed
  • Potential to reduce uncertainty in predictions
  • Extent to which vital needs can be protected
    (e.g. water and clean air)
  • Extent to which disruptions to life will be
    reduced (e.g. disaster mitigation warning)
  • Likelihood of educating the public
  • Linkages to multiple disciplines
  • Consistent with recommendations of the National
    Academies
  • NRC Decadal survey still under development, but
    it will guide near-term priorities

14
Prioritization Criteria Mission Concepts
  • Budget
  • Technological Readiness (including necessary
    infrastructure)
  • Science maturity at any given point in the
    timeline
  • Opportunities for international and domestic
    collaboration
  • Increased opportunities for competition
  • Technology investment needs
  • Need for results

15
2005 to 2015Comprehensive Observing and
Modeling of the Earth System
  • Achievements and Decision Points

16
2005-2015 Comprehensive Observing and Modeling
of the Earth System
17
2015 Modeling Data Management Accomplishments
  • Modeling Accomplishments
  • To be developed
  • Data Management Accomplishments
  • US Integrated Earth Observing System (US IEOS)
    deployed, including all retrospective and
    continuing data collected by the EOS and NOAA
    environmental satellites.
  • Standards for metadata, data and data exchange
    between US and international partners complete.
  • Decision points
  • the state of cooperation between US agencies, and
    within and between US and international partners.
    Questions of intellectual property rights etc.,
    might be of concern
  • Technological issues relating to data exchange.

18
Decision Points 2015
  • We must answer tough questions about the current
    and future program at each decision point
  • What missions must be flown to calibrate
    for/handoff to the NPOESS follow-on in 2025?
  • What new lines of inquiry have been opened up by
    the discoveries we have made?
  • Are each of the themes currently categorized
    appropriately in their phases of Exploration,
    Continuous Awareness, and Perspectives? Typical
    decision questions may be
  • Has the atmospheric chemistry flagship mission
    launched and is it preparing measurements for
    handover to NOAA
  • Have the current clusters made the expected
    progress towards operational use for decision
    support?
  • Have societys priorities shifted, and what are
    the implications for the ordering of our
    clusters?
  • Is the Water cycle (the next cluster) prepared to
    enter the multi-mission continuous awareness
    decade?
  • What missions have slipped in our projected
    timeline and how does that affect our clustering
    and future mission choices?
  • Many internal and external factors influence the
    questions we ask, and the answers we give, at
    this decision point
  • External Factors
  • Administration increased/decreased interest in
    space activities
  • Heightened public concern over climate change,
    air quality, fresh water availability,
    biodiversity, natural disasters, etc.
  • Responsibility for Natural hazards or Climate
    Change assigned to one agency in the US
  • Joint NASA/NOAA identification of measurements
    for hand-off to NOAA for 2025 timeframe
  • Internal Factors
  • Scientific discoveries and technological
    breakthroughs
  • NASA strategic focus shifts and budget constraints

19
2015 to 2025 Expanding Our View of Earth and
Reach Into Society
  • Achievements and Decision Points

20
2015-2025 Expanding Our View of Earth and Reach
Into Society
21
2015-2025 Expanding Our View of Earth and Reach
Into Society
22
2025 Modeling Data Management Accomplishments
  • Modeling Accomplishments
  • To be developed
  • Data Management Accomplishments
  • Data from the operating US IEOS and emerging
    International Global Earth Observation System of
    Systems (GEOSS) data system combined and
    functional and thematic Climate Data Records
    (CDRs) generated spanning in some cases 1970 to
    2020.
  • These CDRs used to characterize global
    variability of for example T, RH, vegetation
    greenness, sea level, sea ice extent, over the
    period of record.
  • These thematic CDRs or the antecedent functional
    CDRs assimilated into Global and Regional models.
  • US IEOS data archive successfully transformed
    from legacy (e.g., circa 2000) media to current
    2020 integrated data system.
  • Universal data discovery implemented across GEOSS

23
Possible Decision Points - 2025
  • We must answer tough questions about the current
    and future program at each decision point
  • Is it possible to handoff or plan handoff of
    Water cycle, Life cycle and/or Solid Earth
    measurements to a national agency?
  • What new lines of inquiry have been opened up by
    the discoveries we have made?
  • Are each of the themes currently categorized
    appropriately in their phases of exploration,
    Continuous Awareness, and Perspectives? Typical
    decision questions may be
  • What are the next generation exploration
    measurements needed by atmospheric chemistry now
    that operations are maintained by NOAA?
  • Will society want NASA to develop missions that
    help to monitor efforts to mitigate climate
    change?
  • Have the current clusters made the expected
    progress towards operational use for decision
    support?
  • Have societys priorities shifted, and what are
    the implications for the ordering of our
    clusters?
  • Have technologies evolved that enable
    unanticipated yet much needed measurement
    capabilities?
  • Have we shown predictive capability for
    earthquakes, volcanoes, and other events with
    InSAR data?
  • What missions have slipped in our projected
    timeline and how does that affect our clustering
    and future mission choices?
  • Many internal and external factors influence the
    questions we ask, and the answers we give, at
    this decision point
  • External Factors
  • US initiative to colonize Mars by the end of
    this century
  • Society starts to plan major population shifts to
    zones of greater habitability
  • Society requests solutions for climate control
  • Internal Factors
  • Scientific discoveries and technological
    breakthroughs

24
2025 to 2035 and Beyond Evolving a Nervous
System for Planet Earth
  • Achievements and Decision Points

25
2025-2035 and Beyond Creating a Nervous System
for Planet Earth
26
2035 Modeling Data Management Accomplishments
  • Modeling Accomplishments
  • To be developed
  • Data Management Accomplishments
  • NASA research and technology development to
    support the U.S. IEOS and International GEOSS
    data systems
  • The entire Earth data archive of the GEOSS
    automatically transitioned to new media on a
    three year cycle.
  • Automated or background processes continuously
    check the health of media and data and transition
    data to new media in the integrated system.
  • Users of the GEOSS are completely unaware of
    storage location, media type, etc., and utilize
    universal data discovery tools to acquire data
    from anywhere in the globally distributed data
    system.
  • Implementation and operation of these systems
    will be a national and international partnership

27
Roadmap Requirements
  • Key capabilities, dependencies on other roadmaps,
    assumptions
  • Human capital and infrastructure needs
  • Near-term priorities and gaps that should be
    addressed in upcoming NASA budget

28
Strategic Roadmap Interfaces
Science Results
System Architectures
Capabilities
Capabilities (Sensors, IT)
Science Results
Science Results
Capabilities
Models
Missions
Data products
(5) Crew Exploration Vehicle
Models
Capabilities
Cal/Val
Requirements
Data products
Science Results
UAV Capabilities
(6) STS - Return to Flight
Science Results
System Architectures
(10) Sun-Earth System
(7) International Space Station
(8) Explore the Universe
29
Linkage Between Strategic Roadmaps
Significant linkages to Lunar, Mars, and Solar
System Exploration Roadmaps (SRs 1, 2, and 3) and
with the Aeronautic Roadmap (SR 11)
  • Planetary Models
  • Models developed for Earth have application to
    those developed for Mars and other terrestrial
    planets. This would include seismic models,
    geophysical models, meteorological models,
    atmospheric models, climate models, etc.
  • Understanding Extreme Environments
  • Mars has spectacular features that offer
    extremes compared to Earth, such as topography
    and dust storms. Analog sites on Earth can
    provide remote sensing opportunities for
    understanding images from Mars.
  • Global Ramifications of Biotic vs Abiotic
    Processes
  • Its extremely hard to find an area or process
    not obfuscated by biology on Earth (such as
    mineral formation, gas production, and
    water/nutrient cycling).  Mars may give us a
    terrestrial planet before adding biology.
  • Common Remote Sensing Instrumentation, Modeling
    and Data Analysis Infrastructure
  • Earth science approaches and capabilities for
    measurement, processing of scientific data, and
    advanced modeling techniques related to data
    interoperability, can benefit Lunar, Mars and
    other planetary sciences, and increase scientific
    return and discovery, prediction, and decision
    making process.
  • Understanding the Shared Geology and Formation of
    the Earth and the Moon
  • Earth/Moon formation, early history (esp. before
    the oldest rocks found on Earth), bombardment
    record, and other shared events. The moon is a
    witness plate to the environment in which life
    on the Earth arose and evolved.
  • Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Development
  • Aerospace innovation for a new generation of
    platforms in support of NASAs end-to-end science
    strategy

30
Linkage Between Earth Sun Strategic Roadmaps
Significant linkages to the Sun-Solar System
Connection Roadmap (SR 10)
  • Understanding Changes in Earths Climate
  • Joint investigation of the effects of solar
    variability on Earths climate and upper
    atmospheric chemistry dynamics include
    understanding of radiative forcing processes,
    energy input from dynamic magnetosphere, and
    solar energetic particle input
  • Understanding Ozone Depletion
  • Joint efforts to understand ozone depletion in
    the polar winter night as a result of energetic
    particle precipitation
  • Understanding and Mitigating Societal Impacts of
    Solar Variability
  • Joint efforts to predict solar variability and
    local space weather in order to mitigate impacts
    on society (e.g. communications, power grids, and
    air traffic routing). Specification aides in
    evaluating and correlating identified impacts
    with space weather, while future prediction
    capabilities will enable impact avoidance and/or
    mitigation.
  • Understanding Terrestrial Field Sources
  • SR 10 provides specification of space-based
    sources of magnetic fields to enable isolation
    and qualification of terrestrial field sources
  • Understanding Seismic Wave Sources
  • SR 10 provides specification of ionospheric
    state in order to detect and quantify deviations
    due to seismic wave sources

31
Linkages from the Capability Roadmap Teams
  • Anticipate Capability Roadmap Team proposed
    linkages from
  • Advanced Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis
    Capability Roadmap Team
  • For complex systems such as the Earth, our
    knowledge and understanding is captured through
    modeling and simulation
  • Scientific Instruments and Sensors Capability
    Roadmap Team
  • Observations from space and supporting
    Earth-based remote and in situ sensing
  • Science questions are pushing the limits of
    spatial and temporal coverage
  • Active sensing for the third dimension
  • Autonomous Systems and Robotics Capability
    Roadmap Team
  • Automating the sensorweb/ modelweb to observe
    dynamic phenomena and accelerate the pace of
    discovery and awareness
  • Capability Roadmap Team proposed linkages
    included (in backup) for
  • Nanotechnology
  • Advanced Telescopes Observatories
  • High Energy Power and Propulsion

32
Key Technical Capability Infrastructure Needs
  • Key Technical Capability Need
  • Capacity to connect multiple observing and
    modeling systems into synergistic networks/
    system of systems
  • Sensorweb/ modelweb simulators and systems
    analysis capacity to advance the state-of-the-art
    in distributed collaborative observing and
    modeling
  • Key Infrastructure Need
  • Full system for gathering data, analyzing data,
    assimilating data, and distributing data/results
    to decision makers on time, with the right
    information.
  • Assimilation, data storage, data analysis,
    knowledge discovery from existing/new datasets,
    data archiving, data accessing, data distribution
  • Distributed, collaborative modeling of the Earth,
    its major component systems, and their
    interactions
  • Multiple, diverse levels of access and cost to
    enable and encourage exploratory/ broad use for
    science, applications, and education

33
Other Needs Research to Operations
  • The Transition of Research Results to Operational
    Use is a Strategic Challenge for Both NASA and
    NOAA
  • Drivers for NASA NOAA Research to Operations
    (R2O) Collaboration
  • Exploiting NASA RD for NOAA operational
    improvements in a constrained fiscal environment
    yet growing user requirements
  • Improving/formalizing process for operational
    requirements/priorities
  • Evaluating NASA Earth science missions early for
    potential operations
  • Rapidly infuse new satellite technologies,
    capabilities, operational applications
  • Implementing 4M in FY 2005 to transition NASA
    ocean-related research into NOAA operations
  • NASA and NOAA will develop an end-to-end process
    for
  • early identification of operational needs during
    Phase A,
  • down-selection criteria during Phase B,
  • trade-offs during Phase C/D, and
  • transition planning during Phase E (MODA).
  • Working Group Kickoff Meeting Nov. 2004,
    Transition Plan by late 2005

34
Top Near-Term Priorities
  • Begin mission formulation to address the
    near-term measurement priorities on the Roadmap
    as identified on timeline
  • Continue opportunities for Exploration and
    Discovery through the Earth System Science
    Pathfinder Program
  • Modeling and data systems investments for the
    full information cycle (observation - modeling -
    analysis - observation tasking)
  • Advance capability to integrate Earth
    observations and models across disciplines,
    institutions, and temporal and spatial scales
  • Enhance capabilities to effectively locate and
    link relevant data, information, and metadata
  • Enhance capabilities for scientific data
    stewardship, data assimilation, and model
    reanalysis
  • Use Atmospheric Composition and Climate
    "clusters" to define a Sun-Climate Flagship
    mission for 2015
  • Advance the maturity of measurements identified
    on the timeline
  • And the maturity of their implementing
    technological options
  • Continue Strategy and Roadmap Refinement
  • NRC Decadal Survey
  • NASA Advisory Council Summer Study
  • Expand community involvement
  • Systems analysis for more rigorous requirements
    analysis and implementation definition

35
Roadmap Summary
  • A graphical depiction of your roadmap and a
    summary of major options and strategic decisions

36
Roadmap Strategy for Implementation Emphasis
CONTINUOUS AWARENESS Integrating Clusters of
Missions, Modeling, Networking, and Management
Attention
Solid Earth
Atmos. Comp.
Climate/ Weather
Water
Life
Frequent Transitions to Operational Partners
Process Understanding Helps Build Perspectives
Understanding processes through Continuous
Awareness
Base of Awareness Investments that Build
towards Future Clusters
Frequent Transitions to Operational Partners
BUILDING PERSPECTIVES
INCREASING OPERATIONAL PARTNER CAPACITY
New Discoveries Contribute to Building Long-Term
Perspectives
Building and Maintaining long-term Perspectives
on our planet
New Discoveries Contribute to Continuous
Awareness Capabilities
On-going investments in Exploration and Discovery
2025
2005
2015
2035
37
Preliminary Investigation Timeline
Global Atmos. Composition
Global Greenhouse Gases
Atmos. Comp. (Cal/val)
Tropospheric Composition
Aerosols
Atmos. Comp.
Temperature/ Humidity Change (Cal/Val)
Global Tropospheric Winds
Ocean Circulation
Cloud Feedback
Ice Elevation Changes
Ice Elevation/ Thickness
3-D Cloud Microphysics
OSTM
Climate
Fresh Water Availability (Cal/val)
Surface Water Storage
Rain process/ Distribution
Time-variable Gravity
Global Precipitation
Root Zone Soil Moisture
Global Soil Moisture
Cold Land Processes
Water Quality
GPM
Water
Ocean Particle Profiles/Mixed Layer Depth
Plant Physiology Function Type
Salinity/ Soil moisture
Biomass/ Vegetation structure
Photosynthetic Efficiency
Ocean Carbon Storage
Advanced Land Cover
Ocean Carbon Storage
Biosignatures
Biomass
Life
Earth Surface Thermal Emission
Surface Deformation
Surface Deformation
Time-varying magnetic field
Surface Topography
Surface Deformation
Solid Earth
ESSP
ESSP
ESSP
ESSP
ESSP
New lines of Inquiry
2005
2015
2025
2035
The Strategic Roadmap Committee did not discuss
the priority of currently funded activities, and
was asked to assume their successful completion
in planning this 30-year roadmap.
38
Investigation Timeline with Strategic Connections
Global Atmos. Composition
Global Greenhouse Gases
Atmos. Comp. (Cal/val)
Tropospheric Composition
Aerosols
Atmos. Comp.
Temperature/ Humidity Change (Cal/Val)
Global Tropospheric Winds
Ocean Circulation
Cloud Feedback
Ice Elevation Changes
Ice Elevation/ Thickness
3-D Cloud Microphysics
OSTM
Climate
Fresh Water Availability (Cal/val)
Surface Water Storage
Rain process/ Distribution
Time-variable Gravity
Global Precipitation
Root Zone Soil Moisture
Global Soil Moisture
Cold Land Processes
Water Quality
GPM
Water
Ocean Particle Profiles/Mixed Layer Depth
Plant Physiology Function Type
Salinity/ Soil moisture
Biomass/ Vegetation structure
Photosynthetic Efficiency
Ocean Carbon Storage
Advanced Land Cover
Ocean Carbon Storage
Biosignatures
Biomass
Life
Earth Surface Thermal Emission
Surface Deformation
Surface Deformation
Time-varying magnetic field
Surface Topography
Surface Deformation
Solid Earth
ESSP
ESSP
ESSP
ESSP
ESSP
New lines of Inquiry
2005
2015
2025
2035
The Strategic Roadmap Committee did not discuss
the priority of currently funded activities, and
was asked to assume their successful completion
in planning this 30-year roadmap.
39
Timeline Flexibility
  • Several factors can influence Earth science
    program timeline
  • There will be a continual feedback loop on
    results and progress
  • Timeline accommodates for flexibility
  • Impacting event causes a decision point, at which
    there are several options
  • Focus altered within exploration or awareness
    portions of cluster
  • New line of inquiry is initiated
  • Order of clusters changed
  • Hand-off to operational agency is accelerated

Impacting event
Operational
New track
Time
2025
2005
2015
2035
40
Other Information
  • Pointers to any available information on cost of
    roadmap elements
  • Cooperation possibilities and benefits

41
Key Cooperation Opportunities
  • Multiple Interagency Partnerships through
    Presidential-level Initiatives
  • Climate Change Research (June 2001)
  • Global Earth Observation (July 2003)
  • U.S. Integrated Earth Observation System
  • Collaborative Oceans Research (December 2004)
  • Near-term coordination with operational remote
    sensing agencies to transition key time series
    Earth system data records from the research to
    the operational domain
  • Global Land Cover Operations through OLI on
    NPOESS
  • Global Ocean Color, Vegetation Properties,
    Surface Temperature, and Atmospheric Properties
    through VIIRS on NPP and then NPOESS
  • Bilateral International Partnerships
  • Framework of the Global Earth Observation System
    of Systems
  • Commercial Value of Earth Observations
  • Presidential Space Policy on Commercial Remote
    Sensing
  • Benefits of Competition and the Feedback of the
    Marketplace

42
Educating and Inspiring Future Generations
  • Earth science and applications from space
    continues to excite, inform, and educate the
    general public and enhance our daily lives.
  • NASA Earth science research offers unique
    opportunity to engage, inform, and educate the
    scientists and technologists of tomorrow through
    missions with direct human relevance, both to
    life on Earth as well as to our human need to
    explore and discover.
  • By revealing the secrets of how the Earth system
    works in exciting and innovative ways, NASA can
    ignite a spark that stimulates students to
    pursue these endeavors by becoming scientists and
    engineers.
  • Earth science education community is meeting to
    define an education roadmap for the next decade,
    and will also provide input for the 30 yr
    timeframe of this roadmap.
  • Earth Science education roadmap highlights the
    importance of engaging and inspiring the public,
    partnering with agencies that also contribute to
    this effort, building on this inspiration to
    educate students and support educators in their
    efforts to prepare students for the career paths
    needed.
  • The results of the on-going Earth Science
    Education Roadmap effort, combined with that from
    the Earth Science and Applications from Space
    Strategic Roadmap Committee, will be incorporated
    into the Education Strategic Roadmap, which is
    only now getting underway.

43
Back-up Slides/ Appendix Material
  • Disclaimers

44
Disclaimer for the April 15 Interim Presentation
  • The Earth Science and Applications from Space
    Strategic Roadmap Committee met on March 16 17
    and discussed the content and scope of this
    presentation
  • The April 15 Presentation represents the work of
    NASA Staff based upon the editorial and inputs of
    individual Committee member and the established
    subcommittees
  • This Interim report does not represent a
    consensus position of the Committee, as the
    schedule did not allow the Committee to meet and
    discuss as a whole this presentation
  • The Committee anticipates coming to consensus on
    the content of this presentation and giving
    direction from the development of the June 1
    document at its next meeting.

45
Disclaimer for June 1 Report
  • The Committee and staff anticipate that the final
    report developed as a result of its next meeting
    will identify notional mission priorities and
    anticipated accomplishments by decade.
  • The implementation concepts for the measurements
    identified in this roadmap range in fidelity from
    carefully studied options to initial notional
    approaches.
  • The pace and schedule for the development of this
    strategic roadmap did not allow for the extensive
    systems analysis to refine and validate the
    implementation reflected in the document.
  • This initial strategic roadmap document
    represents a recommended conceptual framework for
    the future of Earth science and applications from
    space, but will require on-going analysis and
    validation over the coming years.
  • This strategic roadmap includes currently funded
    NASA investigations and their planned
    accomplishments for information purposes only
  • NASA asked the Committee to assume that NASA will
    complete currently funded missions in the first
    decade of the Roadmap, including
  • missions in implementation that NASA has
    committed to complete
  • missions in formulation that have yet to pass
    their Mission Confirmation Review
  • assuming that NASA will find a flight opportunity
    for the Glory instrumentation
  • The Committee did not prioritize or make
    recommendations concerning currently funded
    activities

46
Back-up Slides/ Appendix Material
  • NASAs Constituencies and Role

47
The Delicate Balance of Cosmos and Earth
  • The human need to explore is never exhausted.
  • The compass that today guides this timeless
    endeavor is scientific inquiry.
  • science that gazes outward, providing the grand
    questions that challenge us to journey farther
    and farther from home.
  • science that peers inward, asking the practical
    questions that help us to make Earth safer,
    protect our citizens, and expand our economy
  • Knowledge of the Earth drives the economic growth
    and environmental security that allow us to be an
    exploring nation
  • This program must devote equal attention to both
    questions that underpin our outward desires, and
    questions that support our inward needs.

48
Backup Significance of the U.S. IEOS
  • The U.S. government is developing an over-arching
    strategy for Earth Observation
  • Previously there were pieces via science programs
    such as the Climate Change Science Program
  • The U.S. IEOS provides a coherent, overarching,
    broader, strategy
  • The U.S. IEOS Strategic Plan is organized around
    nine specific societal benefits
  • The U.S. IEOS provides a coherent and politically
    compelling rationale of crosscutting societal,
    scientific, and economic imperatives
  • The U.S. IEOS Strategic Plan identifies (and
    recommends to OMB for investment) five specific
    near-term opportunities
  • The U.S. IEOS Strategic Plan is being developed
    by the U.S. government in consultation with the
    science community
  • First public workshop held June 16-17, 2004,
    second scheduled for May 9-10, 2005
  • Workshops provide a vehicle to bring the Earth
    science community together in order to have its
    views heard

49
Backup Significant National/International
Science Programs
  • Programs in Which NASA Has a National-Level Role

50
External Constituencies and Corresponding NASA
Roles NASAs Strength is in the Intersection
Understand
Inform
Explore
  • This is what we mean by
  • as only NASA can

51
NASAs Vital Role Front-End Research to Enable
National Priorities Societal Benefits
  • Societal Benefits of Environmental Information
  • Effective Feedback Keeps the Pipeline Filled and
    Flowing

National Priorities Presidential
Initiatives Space Act
Environmental Information Infrastructure
OUTCOMES
Creation of New Knowledge and Capabilities Explora
tion Discovery Development
Environmental Information Production
Environmental Information Use
SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE
Govt Agencies Businesses NGOs People
SOCIETAL BENEFITS
NASA NOAA USGS
NASA NSF
SPACE EXPLORATION
Needs, Requirements and Capabilities Feedback
Loops
52
Backup Slides/Appendix Material
  • Joint Strategic Roadmap 9 and 10 L-1 Mission
    Concept

53
Joint Sun-Earth Connection at L1
Science Objective Include solar activity
forecasts and the Earths response into climate
forecasts. Science Goals Understand
feedback processes in the Earths atmosphere
consistent with observed time scales of solar
variability of total and spectral
irradiance. Determine if the patterns of solar
surface temperature are in agreement with
convective theory. Understand the varying
spectrum of radiation emitted by magnetic regions
of the Sun. Additional Objective Provide an
inter-calibration standard for Earth observing
sensors. Deliver continuous space weather
observations from L1.
  • Measurement Strategy
  • Spatial imaging of bolometric flux of solar
    photosphere
  • Rapid (1min) global imaging spectroscopy of
    solar UV, EUV and soft X-rays at moderate
    resolution
  • Imaging solar magnetograph
  • Synoptic scale imaging of terrestrial fluxes
  • Synoptic, high temporal and spatial resolution
    spectral imaging of the sunlit Earth over the
    entire ultraviolet (UV), visible, and infrared
    (IR) spectrum
  • Synoptic measurements of environmentally
    important chemical species and tracers in Earth's
    atmosphere
  • Synoptic measurements of greenhouse gases,
    aerosols, upper-atmosphere dynamics and cloud
    height/phase with a resolution of at least 10km
  • Observations of backside of the Moon (approx.
    monthly) to check/calibrate instruments.
    Integrate calibrations with LEO and GEO.
  • Solar Coronagraph and Space Environment
    Instruments provide continuous upstream
    measurements of energetic particles at L1

Mission Description L1 orbit. Duration One
Solar cycle (11 years). 6 year minimum to
observe Max to Min.
54
Backup Slides/Appendix Material
  • Capability, Infrastructure, and Other Needs

55
Backup Key Required Technical Capabilities
  • Develop capacity to connect multiple observing
    and modeling systems into synergistic networks/
    system of systems
  • Sensorweb/ modelweb simulators and systems
    analysis capacity to advance the state-of-the-art
    in distributed collaborative observing and
    modeling
  • Other Required Capabilities
  • Multi-Mission/Multi-Model Capability to
  • Identify, prioritize, design, and develop
    observing and modeling systems
  • Requires the capacity to assess and optimize the
    multi-objective benefits of new systems in the
    context of larger networks/ system of systems
  • Systems Analysis capabilities for ongoing
    assessments of system of systems and future
    options
  • Design for operations (e.g., to reduce the impact
    of extended operations)
  • Includes the mission design and development
    facilities, methods, and tools to complement
    human capital capabilities in systems
    architecture and program/project management and
    implementation
  • Deploy and operate observing and modeling systems
    and inter-system networks
  • Communications systems and navigation systems
  • Mission and network control systems
  • Observing system launch and deployment systems
  • Identify and develop technologies to improve and
    enable new observing and modeling systems and
    inter-system networks
  • New instrument technologies, computation and
    information technologies, supporting/ platform
    technologies, and system design/ implementation
    technologies
  • New airborne platforms, telepresence, and global
    range communication and control capabilities to
    support integrated space-, suborbital, and in
    situ observing networks.
  • Technologies with the potential to improve future
    operational systems

56
Backup Infrastructure Needs
  • Full system for gathering data, analyzing data,
    assimilating data, and distributing data/results
    to decision makers on time, with the right
    information.
  • Assimilation, data storage, data analysis,
    knowledge discovery from existing/new datasets,
    data archiving, data accessing, data distribution
  • Distributed, collaborative modeling of the Earth,
    its major component systems, and their
    interactions
  • Multiple, diverse levels of access and cost to
    enable and encourage exploratory/ broad use for
    science, applications, and education
  • Other Infrastructure Needs
  • On-going availability within the Nation of
    multi-mission infrastructure for
  • Developing and manufacturing observation missions
  • Includes design centers, clean rooms, test
    chambers, etc.
  • Launching (space-based) or deploying (Earth-based
    such as Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles, UAVs )
    observing missions
  • including available national launch capacity and
    international capacity to deploy validation
    measurement systems
  • Operating missions
  • Infrastructure to coordination and control of
    distributed, collaborating observing and
    modeling systems
  • Guidance, navigation, and communications
    infrastructure -- physical implementation of
    communications and navigation system coupled to
  • Future decisions on observation mission orbits
    and vantage points
  • Space-based relay vs. ground-based communications
    and/or navigation architectures

57
Backup Human Capital and Other Needs
  • Agency human capital and infrastructure
  • System of systems scientific, engineering, and
    management knowledge, expertise, and tools
  • To deal with the complexity of sensor-/
    model-webs
  • Multidiscipline big picture workforce
  • Program and project implementation and management
    knowledge, expertise, and tools
  • To accelerate the pace of discovery by
    implementing missions and systems more quickly,
    more reliably, and more efficiently
  • Other unique requirements
  • Human capital needs extend beyond the Agency
  • Systems of systems expertise within the academic
    community for integrated Earth observing and
    modeling
  • Science, engineering, technology
  • Expertise within government agencies and
    commercial entities to apply Earth observing and
    modeling results
  • To support management and policy decisions
  • To provide valuable services and benefits

58
Recommendations from the Capability Roadmap Teams
  • Proposed Capability Linkages to Earth Science and
    Applications from Space

59
Possible Nanotechnology CapabilitiesProposed
Connections from the Capability Roadmap Team
60
Possible Advanced Telescopes Observatories
CapabilitiesProposed Connections from the
Capability Roadmap Team
61
Possible High Energy Power Propulsion
CapabilitiesProposed Connection from the
Capability Roadmap Team
  • Science robotic spacecraft power
  • Requirement Power required for instruments and
    communication
  • Timeframe required 2008 and beyond
  • When investment in capability should begin Now
  • ROM Capability Investment Cost TBD
  • Rationale for the capability requirement Must
    have power to do missions

62
Back-up Slides/ Appendix Material
  • Committee Membership and Subcommittee Assignments

63
Committee Membership
  • Co-Chairs
  • Orlando Figueroa, NASA Science Mission
    Directorate, co-chair
  • Diane Evans, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, co-chair
  • Charles Kennel, Scripps Institution of
    Oceanography, co-chair
  • Members
  • Waleed Abdalati, Goddard Space Flight Center
  • Leopold Andreoli, Northrop Grumman Space
    Technology
  • Walter Brooks, Ames Research Center
  • Jack Dangermond, ESRI
  • William Gail, Vexcel Corporation
  • Colleen Hartman, National Oceanic and Atmospheric
    Administration
  • Christian Kummerow, Colorado State University
  • Joyce Penner, University of Michigan
  • Douglas Rotman, Lawrence Livermore National
    Laboratory
  • David Siegel, University of California, Santa
    Barbara
  • David Skole, Michigan State University
  • Sean Solomon, Carnegie Institution of Washington
  • Victor Zlotnicki, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

64
Committee Membership
  • Coordinators
  • Gordon Johnston, Mission Directorate Coordinator,
    Designated Federal Official
  • Azita Valinia, Advanced Planning and Systems
    Integration Coordinator
  • Liaison Members
  • Roberta Johnson, University Corporation for
    Atmospheric Research, Liaison to the Education
    Strategic Roadmap Committee
  • Joint Subcommittee (approx. 2 members from each)
    with the Sun-Solar System Connection Strategic
    Roadmap Committee
  • Ex Officio Members
  • Jack Kaye, Earth-Sun System Division
  • Ronald Birk, Earth-Sun System Division
  • George Komar, Earth Science Technology Office
  • Staff
  • Mariann Albjerg, Earth-Sun System Technology
    Office
  • Jeff Booth, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Paul Brandinger, Goddard Space Flight Center
  • Richard Burg, Goddard Space Flight Center
  • Tony Freeman, APIO Systems Engineer, Jet
    Propulsion Laboratory
  • Parminder Ghuman, Earth-Sun System Technology
    Office
  • Steve Hipskind, Ames Research Center
  • Malcolm Ko, Langley Research Center

65
Member Subcommittee Assignments
  • Explorations
  • Waleed Abdalati
  • David Siegel
  • Sean Solomon
  • Leo Andreoli
  • Bill Gail
  • Maintaining Perspectives
  • Colleen Hartman
  • Victor Zlotnicki
  • Joyce Penner
  • Continuous Awareness
  • Doug Rotman
  • Walt Brooks
  • Chris Kummerow
  • David Skole
  • Jack Dangermond
  • SRM 9 Members of Joint 9/10 Subcommittee
  • Chris Kummerow
  • David Siegel
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