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Title: Jobsite Safety


1
Jobsite Safety
  • A Continuing Education Course
  • Presentation By
  • The Office Of Educational Facilities,
  • Florida Department Of Education

2
The Goal for this Jobsite Safety Course is to
inform designers, contractors, code officials,
facilities managers and capital budget officers
about issues regarding the well being of
construction personnel during building
operations. Objectives for this course are
provided here to assist decision makers in
planning provisions for jobsite safety. 1. Make
students aware of responsibilities to prevent
jobsite incidents. 2. Inform students about
applicable laws and regulations that require
jobsite safety features. 3. Increase student
awareness of the effects of a safe versus an
unsafe construction site. 4. A notification to
students regarding the need for construction
safety programs. 5. Provide an overview of
jobsite safety training, personal protective
equipment, and applicable policies and procedures.
3
Who Is Responsible For Safety On Construction
Sites?
  • According to, 29 CFR 1910.12 (a),
  • Each employer shall protect the employment
    and places of employment of each of his employees
    engaged in construction work by complying with
    the appropriate standards prescribed in this
    paragraph.
  • According to, 29 CFR 1926.20 (a) (1)
  • no contractor or subcontractor for any part
    of the contract work shall require any laborer or
    mechanic employed in the performance of the
    contract to work in surroundings or under working
    conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or
    dangerous to his health or safety.

4
Note to Subpart B All employers covered by the
Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act) are
covered by these Part 1904 regulations. However,
most employers do not have to keep OSHA injury
and illness records unless OSHA or the Bureau of
Labor Statistics (BLS) informs them in writing
that they must keep records. For example,
employers with 10 or fewer employees and business
establishments in certain industry
classifications are partially exempt from keeping
OSHA injury and illness records.
5
1904.1(a)(1) If your company had ten (10) or
fewer employees at all times during the last
calendar year, you do not need to keep OSHA
injury and illness records unless OSHA or the BLS
informs you in writing that you must keep records
under 1904.41 or 1904.42. However, as
required by 1904.39, all employers covered by
the OSH Act must report to OSHA any workplace
incident that results in a fatality or the
hospitalization of three or more
employees. 1904.1(a)(2) If your company had more
than ten (10) employees at any time during the
last calendar year, you must keep OSHA injury and
illness records unless your establishment is
classified as a partially exempt industry under
1904.2.
6
Can OSHA Visit My Site?
  • If the owner or employer refuses to permit an
    inspection then the safety inspector must leave
    according to 29 CFR 1903.
  • Once the owner or employer refuses inspection
    then the inspector must obtain an inspection
    warrant from a court of jurisdiction as per
  • Florida Statutes Chapter 933.

7
Employer Responsibilities According To 29 CFR
1926.20
  • Provision of a safe work environment.
  • Provision of workplace safety training.
  • Provision of personal protective equipment.
  • First aid provisions are kept on site and trained
    staff available to use them.
  • Employers are responsible for fire protection and
    prevention.
  • Posted policies and procedures for dealing with
    incidents or accidents.

8
1926.21(a) General requirements. The Secretary
of Labor shall, pursuant to section 107(f) of the
Act, establish and supervise programs for the
education and training of employers and employees
in the recognition, avoidance and prevention of
unsafe conditions in employments covered by the
act. 1926.21(b) Employer responsibility. 1926.
21(b)(1) The employer should avail himself of
the safety and health training programs the
Secretary provides. 1926.21(b)(2) The employer
shall instruct each employee in the recognition
and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the
regulations applicable to his work environment to
control or eliminate any hazards or other
exposure to illness or injury. 1926.21(b)(3)
Employees required to handle or use poisons,
caustics, and other harmful substances shall be
instructed regarding the safe handling and use,
and be made aware of the potential hazards,
personal hygiene, and personal protective
measures required.
9
1926.21(b)(4) In job site areas where harmful
plants or animals are present, employees who may
be exposed shall be instructed regarding the
potential hazards, and how to avoid injury, and
the first aid procedures to be used in the event
of injury. 1926.21(b)(5) Employees required to
handle or use flammable liquids, gases, or toxic
materials shall be instructed in the safe
handling and use of these materials and made
aware of the specific requirements contained in
Subparts D, F, and other applicable subparts of
this part. 1926.21(b)(6)(i) All employees
required to enter into confined or enclosed
spaces shall be instructed as to the nature of
the hazards involved, the necessary precautions
to be taken, and in the use of protective and
emergency equipment required. The employer shall
comply with any specific regulations that apply
to work in dangerous or potentially dangerous
areas. 1926.21(b)(6)(ii) For purposes of
paragraph (b)(6)(i) of this section, "confined or
enclosed space" means any space having a limited
means of egress, which is subject to the
accumulation of toxic or flammable contaminants
or has an oxygen deficient atmosphere. Confined
or enclosed spaces include, but are not limited
to, storage tanks, process vessels, bins,
boilers, ventilation or exhaust ducts, sewers,
underground utility vaults, tunnels, pipelines,
and open top spaces more than 4 feet in depth
such as pits, tubs, vaults, and vessels.
10
First aid services and provisions for medical
care shall be made available by the employer for
every employee covered by these regulations.
Regulations prescribing specific requirements for
first aid, medical attention, and emergency
facilities are contained in Subpart D of this
part.
11
Fire Protection Prevention
  • 29 CFR 1926.24 The employer shall be responsible
    for the development and maintenance of an
    effective fire protection and prevention program
    at the jobsite throughout all phases of the
    construction, repair, alteration, or demolition
    work. The employer shall ensure the availability
    of fire protection and suppression equipment
    required by Subpart F of this part.

12
(b) Water supply. 29 CFR 1926.150 (1) A
temporary or permanent water supply, of
sufficient volume, duration, and pressure,
required to properly operate the firefighting
equipment shall be made available as soon as
combustible materials accumulate. (2) Where
underground water mains are to be provided, they
shall be installed, completed, and made
available for use as soon as practicable. (c)
Portable firefighting equipment. (1) Fire
extinguishers and small hose lines. (i) A fire
extinguisher,rated not less than 2A, shall
be provided for each 3,000 square feet of
the protected building area.
13
There are many staff considerations to be
addressed for achievement of a healthy, safe and
sanitary work environment. These are a few
examples Acceptable potable (drinking) water
and toilet facilities. Adequate lighting for the
tasks to be performed. Protection from excessive
noise levels. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
for possible work hazards. Training for all
equipment used to perform on the job including
power tools. Material Safety Data Sheets for all
substances stored or used on the site. First-aid
equipment and competent staff on site and
available during working hours.
14
1926.51 (c) Toilets At Construction Jobsites.
(1) Toilets shall be provided for
employees according to the following table Table
D 1 Number of Employees Minimum Number of
Facilities 20 or Less 1 20 or More 1
toilet seat and 1 urinal per 40 workers 200 or
More 1 toilet seat and 1 urinal per 50
workers (2) Under temporary field conditions,
provisions shall be made to assure not less than
one toilet facility is available. (3) Job sites
not provided with a sanitary sewer, shall be
provided with one of the following toilet
facilities unless prohibited by local
codes (i) Privies (where their use will not
contaminate ground or surface
water) (ii) Chemical toilets (iii)
Recirculating toilets (iv) Combustion
toilets. (4) Mobile crews with transportation
means are exempt.
15
Florida Building Code Section 3305 Sanitary
facilities shall be provided during construction,
remodeling or demolition activities in accordance
with the Florida Building Code, Plumbing.
16
1926.52 Occupational Noise Exposure (a) Protectio
n against the effects of noise exposure shall be
provided when the sound levels exceed those
shown in Table D-2 of this section when measured
on the A-scale of a standard sound level meter at
slow response. (b) When employees are subjected
to sound levels exceeding those listed in Table
D-2 of this section, feasible administrative or
engineering controls shall be utilized. If such
controls fail to reduce sound levels within the
levels of the table, personal protective
equipment as required in Subpart E, shall be
provided and used to reduce sound levels within
the levels of the table. (c) If the variations
in noise level involve maxima at intervals of 1
second or less, it is to be considered
continuous. (d)(1) In all cases where the sound
levels exceed the values shown herein, a
continuing, effective hearing conservation
program shall be administered.
17
Table D-2 Permissible Noise Exposures
Duration per day, hours Sound level dBA slow
response 8 90 6 92 4 95 3
97 2 100 1 ½
102 1 105 ½
110 ¼ or less 115
18
1926.56 Illumination (a) General.
Construction areas, ramps, runways, corridors ,
offices, shops, and storage areas shall be
lighted to not less than the minimum illumination
intensities listed in Table D 3 applies when
any work is in progress
19
Table D3 Minimum Illumination Intensities In
Foot-Candles Foot- Area of Operation Candles
5 General construction area lighting.
3 General construction areas, concrete placement,
excavation and waste areas, accessways, active
storage areas, loading platforms, refueling, and
field maintenance areas. 5 Indoors
warehouses, corridors, hallways, and exitways.
5 Tunnels, shafts, general underground work
areas. (exception minimum of 10 foot-candles is
required at tunnel and shaft heading during
drilling, mucking, and scaling. Bureau of Mines
approved cap lights shall be acceptable for use
in the tunnel heading. 10 General
construction plant shops (e.g., batch plants,
screening plants, mechanical electrical
equipment rooms, carpenter shops, rigging lofts
and active storerooms, barracks or living
quarters, locker or dressing rooms, mess halls,
indoor toilets and workrooms). 30 First
aid stations, infirmaries, and offices.
20
Which personal protective equipment is correct?
  • 29 CFR 1926, Subpart E specifies personal
    protective equipment for various types of
    hazards.
  • 29 CFR 1926.95 provides criteria for personal
    protective equipment decisions.
  • 29 CFR 1926.96 through 1926.107 specifies the
    type of personal protective equipment necessary
    for each type of hazard.

21
(No Transcript)
22
Insist On Approved Steel Toed Boots! 1926.96 Occ
upational Foot Protection Safety toe footwear
for employees shall meet the requirements and
specifications in American National Standard for
Mens Safety Toe Footwear, Z41.1-1967.
23
1926.100 Head Protection (a) Employees working
in areas where there is a possible danger of
head injury from impact, or from falling or
flying objects, or from electrical shock and
burns, shall be protected by protective
helmets. (b) Helmets for the protection of
employees against impact and penetration of
falling and flying objects shall meet the
specifications contained in American National
Standards Institute, Z89.1-1969, Safety
Requirements for Industrial Head
Protection. (c) Helmets for the head protection
of employees exposed to high voltage electrical
shock and burns shall meet the specifications
contained in American National Standards
Institute, Z89.2-1971.
24
1926.101 Hearing protection (a) Wherever it
is not feasible to reduce the noise levels or
duration of exposures to those specified in
Table D-2, Permissible Noise Exposures, in
1926.52, ear protective devices shall be
provided and used. (b) Ear protective devices
inserted in the ear shall be fitted or
determined individually by competent
persons. (c) Plain cotton is not an acceptable
protective device.
25
1926.102 Eye and Face Protection (a) General. (1)
Employees shall be provided with eye and face
protection equipment when machines or
operations present potential eye or face injury
from physical, chemical, or radiation
agents. (2) Eye and face protection equipment
required by this Part shall meet
the requirements specified in American National
Standards Institute, Z87.1-1968, Practice for
Occupational and Educational Eye and Face
Protection. (3) Employees whose vision
requires the use of corrective lenses in
spectacles, when required by this regulation to
wear eye protection, shall be protected by
goggles or spectacles of one of the following
types (i) Spectacles whose protective lenses
provide optical correction (ii) Goggles
that can be worn over corrective spectacles
without disturbing the adjustment of the
spectacles (iii) Goggles that incorporate
corrective lenses mounted behind the
protective lenses. continued
26
(4) Face and eye protection equipment shall
be kept clean and in good repair. The use of
this type of equipment with structural or
optical defects shall be prohibited. (5) Table
E-1 shall be used as a guide in the election of
face and eye protection for the hazards and
operations noted.
27
(No Transcript)
28
1926.103 Subpart E Personal Protective Life
Saving Equipment Operation Hazards
Recommended Protectors Acetylene Welding Sparks,
flying particles 7, 8, 9 Chemical
Handling Splash, acid burns, fumes 2,10 (
extreme exposure add 10 over 2 ) Chipping Flying
particles 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7A, 8A Electric (Arc)
Welding Sparks, Intense Rays, 9, 11(11 in
combination with 4, 5, 6, in molten metal
tinted lenses advisable) Furnace
Operations Glare, heat, molten metal 7, 8, 9
(for severe exposure add 10) Grinding
Light Flying particles 1, 3, 4, 5, 6,
10 Grinding Heavy Flying particles 1, 3, 7A,
8A (for severe exposure add
10) Laboratory Chemical Splash, glass breakage 2
(10 when in combination with 4, 5,
6) Machining Flying particles 1, 3, 4, 5, 6,
10 Molten Metals Heat, glare, sparks, splash 7,
8 (10 in combination with 4, 5, 6, in
tinted lenses) Spot Welding Flying
particles, sparks 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10
29
29 CFR 1926.24 The employer shall be responsible
for the development and maintenance of an
effective fire protection and prevention program
at the job site throughout all phases of the
construction, repair, alteration, or demolition
work. The employer shall ensure the availability
of the fire protection and suppression equipment
required by Subpart F of this part.
30
1926.150 Fire protection (a) (1) The employer
shall be responsible for the development of a
fire protection program to be followed throughout
all phases of the construction and demolition
work, and he shall provide for the firefighting
equipment as ,specified in this subpart. As fire
hazards occur, there shall be no delay in
providing the necessary equipment. (2) Access to
all available firefighting equipment shall be
maintained at all times. (3) All firefighting
equipment, provided by the employer, shall be
conspicuously located. (4) All firefighting
equipment shall be periodically inspected and
maintained in operating condition. Defective
equipment shall be immediately replaced. (5) As
warranted by the project, the employer shall
provide a trained and equipped firefighting
organization (Fire Brigade) to assure adequate
protection to life.
31
1926.150(b) Water supply. 1926.150(b)(1) A
temporary or permanent water supply, of
sufficient volume, duration, and pressure,
required to properly operate the firefighting
equipment shall be made available as soon as
combustible materials accumulate. 1926.150(b)(2)
Where underground water mains are to be
provided, they shall be installed, completed, and
made available for use as soon as practicable.
32
(c) Portable Fire Fighting Equipment (1) (i) A
fire extinguisher, rated not less than 2A, shall
be provided for each 3000 square feet of the
protected building area, or major fraction
thereof. Travel distance from any point of the
protected area to the nearest fire extinguisher
shall not exceed 100 feet. (ii) One 55-gallon
open drum of water with two fire pails may be
substituted for a fire extinguisher having a 2A
rating. (iii) A 1/2-inch diameter garden-type
hose line, not to exceed 100 feet in length and
equipped with a nozzle, may be substituted for a
2A-rated fire extinguisher, providing it is
capable of discharging a minimum of 5 gallons per
minute with a minimum hose stream range of 30
feet horizontally. The garden-type hose lines
shall be mounted on conventional racks or reels.
The number and location of hose racks or reels
shall be such that at least one hose stream can
be applied to all points in the area. (iv) One
or more fire extinguishers, rated not less than
2A, shall be provided on each floor. In
multistory buildings, at least one fire
extinguisher shall be located adjacent to
stairway.
33
(No Transcript)
34
1926.652(a) Protection of employees in
excavations. 1926.652(a)(1) Each employee in an
excavation shall be protected from cave-ins by an
adequate protective system designed in accordance
with paragraph (b) or (c) of this section except
when 1926.652(a)(1)(i) Excavations are made
entirely in stable rock or 1926.652(a)(1)(ii)
Excavations are less than 5 feet (1.52 m) in
depth and examination of the ground by a
competent person provides no indication of a
potential cave-in. 1926.652(a)(2) Protective
systems shall have the capacity to resist without
failure all loads that are intended or could
reasonably be expected to be applied or
transmitted to the system.
35
1926.652(b) Design of sloping and benching
systems. The slopes and configurations of sloping
and benching systems shall be selected and
constructed by the employer or his designee and
shall be in accordance with the requirements of
paragraph (b)(1) or, in the alternative,
paragraph (b)(2) or, in the alternative,
paragraph (b)(3) or, in the alternative,
paragraph (b)(4), as follows1926.652(b)(1)
Option (1) - Allowable configurations and
slopes. 1926.652(b)(1)(i) Excavations shall be
sloped at an angle not steeper than one and
one-half horizontal to one vertical (34 degrees
measured from the horizontal), unless the
employer uses one of the other options listed
below. 1926.652(b)(1)(ii) Slopes specified in
paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section, shall be
excavated to form configurations that are in
accordance with the slopes shown for Type C soil
in Appendix B to this subpart. 1926.652(b)(2)
Option (2) - Determination of slopes and
configurations using Appendices A and B. Maximum
allowable slopes, and allowable configurations
for sloping and benching systems, shall be
determined in accordance with the conditions and
requirements set forth in appendices A and B to
this subpart.1926.652(b)(3) Option (3) - Designs
using other tabulated data. 1926.652(b)(3)(i)
Designs of sloping or benching systems shall be
selected from and in accordance with tabulated
data, such as tables and charts. 1926.652(b)(3)(ii
) The tabulated data shall be in written form and
shall include all of the following..1926.652(b)(3
)(ii)(A)
36
1926.652(b)(3)(ii)(A) Identification of the
parameters that affect the selection of a sloping
or benching system drawn from such
data 1926.652(b)(3)(ii)(B) Identification of the
limits of use of the data, to include the
magnitude and configuration of slopes determined
to be safe 1926.652(b)(3)(ii)(C) Explanatory
information as may be necessary to aid the user
in making a correct selection of a protective
system from the data. 1926.652(b)(3)(iii) At
least one copy of the tabulated data which
identifies the registered professional engineer
who approved the data, shall be maintained at the
jobsite during construction of the protective
system. After that time the data may be stored
off the jobsite, but a copy of the data shall be
made available to the Secretary of Labor upon
request.
37
"Cemented soil" means a soil in which the
particles are held together by a chemical agent,
such as calcium carbonate, such that a hand-size
sample cannot be crushed into powder or
individual soil particles by finger pressure.
"Cohesive soil" means clay (fine grained soil),
or soil with a high clay content, which has
cohesive strength. Cohesive soil does not
crumble, can be excavated with vertical
sideslopes, and is plastic when moist. Cohesive
soil is hard to break up when dry, and exhibits
significant cohesion when submerged. Cohesive
soils include clayey silt, sandy clay, silty
clay, clay and organic clay. "Dry soil" means
soil that does not exhibit visible signs of
moisture content. "Fissured" means a soil
material that has a tendency to break along
definite planes of fracture with little
resistance, or a material that exhibits open
cracks, such as tension cracks, in an exposed
surface.
38
"Granular soil" means gravel, sand, or silt
(coarse grained soil) with little or no clay
content. Granular soil has no cohesive strength.
Some moist granular soils exhibit apparent
cohesion. Granular soil cannot be molded when
moist and crumbles easily when dry. "Layered
system" means two or more distinctly different
soil or rock types arranged in layers. Micaceous
seams or weakened planes in rock or shale are
considered layered. "Moist soil" means a
condition in which a soil looks and feels damp.
Moist cohesive soil can easily be shaped into a
ball and rolled into small diameter threads
before crumbling. Moist granular soil that
contains some cohesive material will exhibit
signs of cohesion between particles. "Plastic"
means a property of a soil which allows the soil
to be deformed or molded without cracking, or
appreciable volume change.
39
"Saturated soil" means a soil in which the voids
are filled with water. Saturation does not
require flow. Saturation, or near saturation, is
necessary for the proper use of instruments such
as a pocket penetrometer or sheer vane. "Soil
classification system" means, for the purpose of
this subpart, a method of categorizing soil and
rock deposits in a hierarchy of Stable Rock, Type
A, Type B, and Type C, in decreasing order of
stability. The categories are determined based on
an analysis of the properties and performance
characteristics of the deposits and the
characteristics of the deposits and the
environmental conditions of exposure. "Stable
rock" means natural solid mineral matter that can
be excavated with vertical sides and remain
intact while exposed. "Submerged soil" means
soil which is underwater or is free seeping.
40
"Type A" means cohesive soils with an
unconfined, compressive strength of 1.5 ton per
square foot (tsf) (144 kPa) or greater. Examples
of cohesive soils are clay, silty clay, sandy
clay, clay loam and, in some cases, silty clay
loam and sandy clay loam. Cemented soils such as
caliche and hardpan are also considered Type A.
However, no soil is Type A if (i) The soil is
fissured or (ii) The soil is subject to
vibration from heavy traffic, pile driving, or
similar effects or (iii) The soil has been
previously disturbed or (iv) The soil is part
of a sloped, layered system where the layers dip
into the excavation on a slope of four horizontal
to one vertical (4H1V) or greater or (v) The
material is subject to other factors that would
require it to be classified as a less stable
material.
41
"Type B" means (i) Cohesive soil with an
unconfined compressive strength greater than 0.5
tsf (48 kPa) but less than 1.5 tsf (144 kPa) or
(ii) Granular cohesionless soils including
angular gravel (similar to crushed rock), silt,
silt loam, sandy loam and, in some cases, silty
clay loam and sandy clay loam. (iii) Previously
disturbed soils except those which would
otherwise be classed as Type C soil. (iv) Soil
that meets the unconfined compressive strength or
cementation requirements for Type A, but is
fissured or subject to vibration or (v) Dry
rock that is not stable or (vi) Material that
is part of a sloped, layered system where the
layers dip into the excavation on a slope less
steep than four horizontal to one vertical
(4H1V), but only if the material would otherwise
be classified as Type B.
42
"Type C" means (i) Cohesive soil with an
unconfined compressive strength of 0.5 tsf (48
kPa) or less or (ii) Granular soils including
gravel, sand, and loamy sand or (iii) Submerged
soil or soil from which water is freely seeping
or (iv) Submerged rock that is not stable, or
(v) Material in a sloped, layered system where
the layers dip into the excavation or a slope of
four horizontal to one vertical (4H1V) or
steeper. "Unconfined compressive strength" means
the load per unit area at which a soil will fail
in compression. It can be determined by
laboratory testing, or estimated in the field
using a pocket penetrometer, by thumb penetration
tests, and other methods. "Wet soil" means soil
that contains significantly more moisture than
moist soil, but in such a range of values that
cohesive material will slump or begin to flow
when vibrated. Granular material that would
exhibit cohesive properties when moist will lose
those cohesive properties when wet.
43
"Unconfined compressive strength" means the load
per unit area at which a soil will fail in
compression. It can be determined by laboratory
testing, or estimated in the field using a pocket
penetrometer, by thumb penetration tests, and
other methods. "Wet soil" means soil that
contains significantly more moisture than moist
soil, but in such a range of values that cohesive
material will slump or begin to flow when
vibrated. Granular material that would exhibit
cohesive properties when moist will lose those
cohesive properties when wet.
44
Soil or Rock Type Maximum
Allowable Slopes (HV)¹ For
Excavations Less Than 20 Feet
Deep³ Stable Rock Vertical
(90) Type A ¾1 (53) Type
B 11 (45) Type C 1 ½ 1
(34) 1. Numbers shown in parentheses next to
maximum allowable slopes are angles expressed in
degrees from the horizontal. Angles have been
rounded off. 2. A short-term maximum allowable
slope of 1/2H1V (63) is allowed in excavations
in Type A soil that are 12 feet (3.67 m) or less
in depth. Short-term maximum allowable slopes for
excavations greater than 12 feet (3.67 m) in
depth shall be 3/4H1V (53). 3. Sloping or
benching for excavations greater than 20 feet
deep shall be designed by a registered
professional engineer.
45
What is a safe working environment and how is it
accomplished?
  • A safety officer is assigned to anticipate causes
    of accidents and minimize risks.
  • All employees are trained to deal with possible
    hazards of operations.
  • Scheduled and unscheduled inspections are made by
    qualified staff.
  • Policies and procedures are established to deal
    with emergencies.
  • See 29 CFR 1926.20 1926.21

46
What is jobsite safety training all about?
  • Personal protective equipment training.
  • Job equipment training (tools, machinery, etc)
  • First aid training.
  • Training to document and record incidents and
    accidents.
  • Substance abuse detection and intervention
    training.
  • Policies and procedures training.
  • Hazardous materials training.
  • See 29 CFR 1926.21 for guidelines

47
Record keeping for incidents and accidents.
  • OSHA 300 Logs and OSHA 301 Incident Report forms
    are to retained for at least five (5) years
    following the end of the calendar year that these
    records cover.
  • OSHA 300 Logs must be updated to include new
    information concerning injuries or illnesses. 29
    CFR 1904.33

48
Employers are responsible for first aid.
  • 29 CFR 1926.50, Employers must provide Access to
    prompt medical attention. Access to
    proper first aid equipment. Posted
    emergency phone numbers. Ability to
    flush out corrosives from eyes or body.

    Policies and procedures for injuries or
    illnesses.
    Access to prompt emergency transport.

49
Policies Procedures
  • Covering illnesses and injuries.
  • Covering when and who to notify.
  • Covering when and how to report.
  • Covering what, when and how to document.
  • Specifying locations for emergency equipment and
    communications.
  • Commitment to training for all staff to deal with
    emergencies.
  • All in accordance with 29 CFR 1926

50
What Is A Safety Plan?
  • Assign qualified staff responsibilities.
  • Establish emergency procedures.
  • Establish operational and emergency training.
  • Provide personal protective equipment where
    required by policy or regulations.
  • Set up frequent and random inspections to abate
    or resolve safety issues.
  • See 29 CFR 1926 for guidelines.

51
Employers Responsibility To Notify Employees
About Hazardous Materials According To CFR
1910.1200
  • Employers shall provide MSDS for every material
    used or stored on site.
  • School principals must be notified 3 days before
    using hazardous materials according to SREF
    Section 4.2 (6).
  • Employers shall provide appropriate storage
    cabinets and/or containers when required.
  • Employers shall provide personal protective
    equipment to prevent employee exposure to
    hazardous materials when required.

52
QUIZ
  • What is PPE?
  • Personal Protective Equipment, See 29 CFR
    1926.95.
  • Are employers responsible for fire protection?
  • Yes, See 29 CFR 1926.24.
  • When must excavations in Class C soils be
    protected from collapse?
  • When the excavation is 5 or deeper according to
    29 CFR 1926.652.

53
REMEMBER TO MAKE SAFETY ON THE JOBSITE
EVERYONES NUMBER ONE JOB! YOUR LIFE MAY DEPEND
ON IT!
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