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Jennifer Michel

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Presented by Jennifer Michel Art Nouveau Art Nouveau Artists Muncha Tarot Art Nouveau Painted by the Italian artist Antonella Castelli Published in 1998 by Lo ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Jennifer Michel


1
  • Twentieth Century
  • Art Movements
  • Presented by
  • Jennifer Michel

2
Art Deco
Art Nouveau
Surrealism
Bauhaus
3
(No Transcript)
4
Art Nouveau
  • A decorative-art movement centered in Western
    Europe.
  • Began in the 1880s as a reaction against the
    historical emphasis of mid-19th-century art, but
    did not survive World War I.
  • Art nouveau originated in London and was
    variously called Jugendstilin Germany,
    Sezessionstilin Austria, and Modernismoi...

5
Art Nouveau Artists
  • Muncha

Beardsley
6
Tarot Art Nouveau
  • Painted by the Italian artist Antonella Castelli
  • Published in 1998 by Lo Scarabeo, and is now
    distributed by U.S.Games Systems with a booklet
    translated into English
  • There is a separate deck called the Art Nouveau
    Tarot by Matt Myers
  • It is less representative of art nouveau and
    shows the additional influence of stained glass
    design

7
Art Nouveau Furniture
8
Art Nouveau Glass
9
Art Nouveau Architecture
10
Art Nouveau Architecture
11
Art Deco Design
  • During the period between the two world wars, an
    eclectic design style developed
  • Architecture and applied arts of the period
    reveal a varied mix, most share the hallmarks of
    geometry and simplicity, often combined with
    vibrant colors and simple shapes that celebrate
    the rise of commerce and technology
  • Consultants were commissioned by manufacturing
    companies to produce a variety of goods
  • Art deco graphics are a product of their age, and
    reflect a spirit of modernity and industrial
    ingenuity
  • The graphic style of the period often used
    geometric formality and simplicity to transform
    or distort reality
  • Today, "art deco" is used to refer to a mix of
    styles from the 1920s and 1930s

12
Cubism Futurism
Elements of Cubism and Futurism are apparent in
many works
Cubism
Futurism
13
Cubism Futurism
Elements of Cubism and Futurism are apparent in
many works
Cubism
Futurism
14
Cubism
  • A movement in modern art, especially painting
  • Invented by Spanish artist Pablo Picasso and
    French artist Georges Braque in 1907 and 1908
  • Cubist paintings create an ambiguous sense of
    space through geometric shapes that flatten and
    simplify form, spatial planes that are broken
    into fragments, and forms that overlap and
    penetrate one another

15
Cubism
  • A movement in modern art, especially painting
  • Invented by Spanish artist Pablo Picasso and
    French artist Georges Braque in 1907 and 1908
  • Cubist paintings create an ambiguous sense of
    space through geometric shapes that flatten and
    simplify form, spatial planes that are broken
    into fragments, and forms that overlap and
    penetrate one another

16
Futurism
  • Early 20th-century artistic movement that
    centered in Italy sand emphasized the dynamism,
    speed, energy, and power of the machine and the
    vitality, change, and restlessness of modern life
    in general
  • The most significant results of the movement were
    in the visual arts and poetry
  • The name Futurism, coined by Marinetti,
    reflected his emphasis on discarding what he
    conceived to be the static and irrelevant art of
    the past and celebrating change, originality,
    and innovation in culture and society

17
Futurism
  • Early 20th-century artistic movement that
    centered in Italy sand emphasized the dynamism,
    speed, energy, and power of the machine and the
    vitality, change, and restlessness of modern life
    in general
  • The most significant results of the movement were
    in the visual arts and poetry
  • The name Futurism, coined by Marinetti,
    reflected his emphasis on discarding what he
    conceived to be the static and irrelevant art of
    the past and celebrating change, originality,
    and innovation in culture and society

18
Deco Artists
Lempicka
Kung
19
Art Deco Stained Glass
20
Art Deco Architecture
  • Crisp geometric patterns, surface ornaments and
    exotic materials were present in many of
  • buildings of the era

New York's Art Deco skyscrapers are more than
buildings they are monuments to the technology
and financial power that created them
The buildings of Miami's Art Deco district, on
the other hand, reflect the Hollywood style, with
their striking facades and colors
21
Art Deco Architecture
Crisp geometric patterns, surface ornaments and
exotic materials were present in many
of buildings of the era
New York's Art Deco skyscrapers are more than
buildings they are monuments to the technology
and financial power that created them
The buildings of Miami's Art Deco district, on
the other hand, reflect the Hollywood style, with
their striking facades and colors
22
Bauhaus Theory
The Bauhaus is not a style
it is a collection of attitudes
  • Theories for which the Bauhaus stood for are
    condensed in the slogan of "functionalism"
  • Functionalism is the belief that if something is
    only designed to fit its purpose we can let
    beauty look after itself)
  • The best works of this style are beautiful not
    only because they happen to fit the function for
    which they are built but because they were
    designed by men of tact and taste who knew how to
    make an object or building fit for its purpose
    and yet right for the eye

23
School of Bauhaus
Founded in Weimar Germany in 1919 by the
architect Walter Gropius.
  • The Bauhaus Manifesto united the teaching of fine
    art, applied art architecture in order to
    educate creative people capable of large scale
    collaborative projects or "total works of art"
  • The word Bauhaus is derived from the "hausbau"
    meaning construction and implies not only
    building and construction but also reconstruction
    and is identified with functionalism
  • Students were encouraged touse their imagination
    and to experiment boldly yet never to lose
    sight of the purpose which their designs should
    serve

24
Bauhaus Furniture
It was at the school that tubular steel chairs
and similar furnishings of our daily use were
designed
25
Bauhaus Architecture
26
Bauhaus Artists
Kadinski
Flag
Klee
27
Bauhaus Typography
The Bauhaus favored the use of sans serif fonts
which was frowned upon heavily by most of Germany
which preferred a heavier more complicated gothic
font
28
Bauhaus
Bauhaus broke up in 1983, yet fifteen years later
their back catalogue sells better than
ever Their style still contemporary, and the
live shows are now legendary. With the image
and brooding music it was inevitable that
Bauhaus would be classified with the vanguard
of the "goth" fashion, a totally misleading
confinement which ignored their humor,
experimentation and uniqueness.
  • Peter Murphy
  • Daniel Ash
  • David J
  • Kevin Haskins

29
Bauhaus
Bauhaus broke up in 1983, yet fifteen years later
their back catalogue sells better than
ever Their style still contemporary, and the
live shows are now legendary. With the image
and brooding music it was inevitable that
Bauhaus would be classified with the vanguard
of the "goth" fashion, a totally misleading
confinement which ignored their humor,
experimentation and uniqueness.
Peter Murphy Daniel Ash David J Kevin Haskins
30
Surrealism
  • At the end of the First War World, Tristan Tzara,
    leader of the Dada movement, wanted to attack
    society through scandal
  • He believed that a society that creates the
    monstrosity of war does not deserve art, so he
    decided to give it anti-artnot beauty but
    ugliness
  • Surrealism as we know it today is closely related
    to some forms of abstract art
  • Two Distinct Groups Emerge
  • The Automatists
  • The Veristic Surrealists

31
The Automatists
  • A suppression of consciousness in favor of the
    subconscious
  • The automatic way in which the images of the
    subconscious reach the conscience. They believed
    these images should not be burdened with
    "meaning
  • Automatists saw the academic discipline of art as
    intolerant of the free expression of feeling, and
    felt form, which had dominated the history of
    art, was a culprit in that intolerance
  • Coming from the Dada tradition, they continued to
    believe that lack of form was a way to rebel
    against them

32
Veristic Surrealists
  • Wanted to represent these images as a link
    between the abstract spiritual realities, and the
    real forms of the material world. To them, the
    object stood as a metaphor for an inner reality
  • Saw academic discipline and form as the means to
    represent the images of the subconscious with
    veracity as a way to freeze images that, if
    unrecorded, would easily dissolve once again into
    the unknown. They hoped to find a way to follow
    the images of the subconscious until the
    conscience could understand their meaning.

33
Salvador Dali
  • Dali embraced all the science of painting as a
    way to study the psyche through subconscious
    images. He called this the Paranoiac Critical
    Method. The artist should allow these images to
    reach the conscience, and then
  • Freeze them on canvas to give consciousness the
    opportunity to comprehend their meaning

Later on, he expanded the process into the
Oniric-Critical Method, in which the artist pays
attention to his dreams, freezing them through
art, and analyzing them as well
34
Pablo Picasso
  • Inherited the gusto for ugliness, scandal and
    chaos of the Dada movement and the automatic
    surrealists
  • Rejected the craft to become"primitive,"
    deciding that the ingenuity of childhood is the
    basis of art, to him this meant that the less
    the artist is preoccupied with his craft the
    better his art

35
Future of Surrealism
  • In 1941, Surrealism was declared dead and has
    been described as such in art history books since
    that time
  • Because it was rejected by the new academy of
    modernism, Veristic Surrealism in its new
    evolution has become a new art
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