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What is the difference between politics and government

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Government means different things to different people. ... PLANS FOR GOVERNMENT NEW JERSEY PLAN. A. Unicameral Congress based on equal. representation ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: What is the difference between politics and government


1
  • What is the difference between politics and
    government?

2
WHAT IS GOVERNMENT?
Government means different things to different
people.
Government is involved in everything that you do.
Government is necessary
When thinking about Government, think outside
the box
3
THEORIES ON THE ORIGINS OF GOVERNMENT
FORCE
EVOLUTIONARY
DIVINE RIGHT THEORY
SOCIAL CONTRACT THEORY
4
WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF GOVERNMENT?
STRUCTURES OF GOVERNMENT
Unitary Confederate Federal Parliamentary Pr
esidential Dictatorship
Democracy
5
DEMOCRACY
Fundamental Worth of the Individual
Equality of all Persons Majority Rule/Minority Ri
ghts
Necessity of Compromise Individual Freedom
6
FORMATION OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
Ideas of government came from Great Britain
A. Ordered Government B. Limited Government
C. Representative Government
7
II. IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS IN BRITISH HISTORY
A. Magna Charta B. Petition of Rights
C. English Bill of Rights
8
COLONIAL GOVERNMENTS A. Colonial governments
royal, proprietary and charter colonies.
B. Colonial legislaturesbi-cameral or un
i-cameral.
MASSACHUSETTS is ok to govern themselves
9
REASONS FOR WANTING INDEPENDENCE
A. French and Indian War B. taxation witho
ut representation C. King George III D.
Stamp Act E. Boston Tea Party closing of
Boston Harbor F. Intolerable Acts
10
FIRST CONTINENTAL CONGRESS A. September 5, 17
74 B. Original purpose--?? C. Encoura
ged boycott of British goods D. Agreed to ret
urn nine months later

11
SECOND CONTINENTAL CONGRESS A. May 10, 1775

B. Served as nations first government
12
DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE A. Proposed June
7, 1776
B. Ratified July 4, 1776
13
ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION A. March 1, 1781
B. States came together for defense and
international affairs C. Congress could
only ask to borrow money D. States had most o
f the power E. Weaknesses of the Articles of
Confederation
14
SHAYS REBELLION A. Massachusetts, 1786 B
. Led by angry farmers
15
PHILADELPHIA CONVENTION May 25, 1787 Origina
l intentto revise the Articles
Became the Framers (The Founding Fathers) of
the new Constitution
16
PLANS FOR GOVERNMENTVIRGINIA PLAN
A. Separate government branches B. Bicame
ral legislature based on population
and election. C. Stronger central governme
nt over state actions. D. Congress chose
the executive and the judiciary.
17
PLANS FOR GOVERNMENTNEW JERSEY PLAN
A. Unicameral Congress based on equal
representation B. Congress could tax and re
gulate trade between states. C. Plural e
xecutive council chosen by Congress
Judiciary chosen by executive.
18
COMPROMISES AT THE CONVENTION A. Connecticut
Compromise B. Three-Fifths Compromise C.
Other compromises
19
RATIFICATION A. Federalists vs. Anti-Federa
lists B. Ratified on September 13, 1788 C
. March 4, 1789New Congress convenes
D. April 30, 1789George Washington becomes
first U.S. President.
20
  • In the United States, any citizen can do
    anything he or she wants to do.
  • Do you agree or disagree, and why or why not?

21
CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CONSTITUTION
sets the foundation for all laws. shortest an
d longest-lasting.
C. specific yet vague.
22
(No Transcript)
23
SIX PRINCIPLES OF THE CONSTITUTION
Popular Sovereignty Limited Government Sep
aration of Powers Checks and Balances Judici
al Review Federalism
24
Popular Sovereignty
  • --all political power rests with the people
  • --people are the only source of any and all
    government power
  • --consent of the governed
  • --We the People

25
Limited Government
  • --no government is all-powerful
  • --government may do only those things that the
    people have given it the power to do.
  • --government must obey the law
  • --principle of constitutionalism
  • --rule of law
  • --Congress shall make no law

26
Separation of Powers
  • --power is distributed among various branches
    of government.
  • --opening lines of Articles I, II, and III of the
    Constitution.
  • --also can be found in state constitutions.

27
Checks and Balances
  • --each branch of government can be checked
    (restrained) by the other branches.
  • --designed to prevent ?????
  • --divided government

28
Checks and Balances
  • The Legislative Branch checks the Judicial
    Branch.
  • by creating lower federal courts
  • removing judges through impeachment
  • approval or rejection of judges by the Senate

29
Checks and Balances
  • The Legislative Branch checks the Executive
    Branch
  • when they override Presidential vetos
  • remove Presidents through impeachment
  • approve Presidential treaties and appointments
  • make laws, create agencies and programs
  • appropriate funding

30
Checks and Balances
  • The Executive Branch checks the Legislative
    Branch
  • when the President vetoes legislation
  • when the President calls Congress into special
    session
  • when the President recommends legislation to
    Congress
  • when the President appeals to the people

31
Checks and Balances
  • The Executive Branch checks the Judicial Branch
  • nominates Supreme Court and other federal
    judges

32
Checks and Balances
  • The Judicial Branch checks the Legislative Branch
  • when the courts declare acts of Congress to be
    unconstitutional

33
Checks and Balances
  • The Judicial Branch checks the Executive Branch
  • when the courts declare executive actions to be
    unconstitutional
  • all federal judges remain free from executive
    control

34
Judicial Review
  • The authority of the courts (state and federal)
    to review and determine the Constitutionality of
    state and federal laws, as well as actions taken
    by state and federal officials (lawmakers,
    governors, Presidents, etc.)
  • Marbury v. Madison (1803)

35
How to read the Constitution
ASSIGNMENTS Constitutional Scavenger Hunt C
onstitutional Amendment Project
36
Changing a Law???
  • Think of a law you would like to change.

How would you go about changing it?
How would you feel if there were no way to change
it?
37
Amending the ConstitutionFormal Methods
Proposal by 2/3 vote of Congress

Ratified by 3/4 of state legislatures.
Proposed by 2/3 vote in Congress
Ratified by 3/4 of state constitutional conventi
ons
38
Proposed by 2/3 vote in Congress at the request
of state constitutional conventions

Ratified by 3/4 of state legislatures.
Proposed by 2/3 vote in Congress at the request
of state constitutional conventions.

Ratified by 3/4 state constitutional conventions
39
Informal Amendment of the Constitution
through Basic Legislation-- when Congress passes
a law clarifying Constitutional provisions.
EX Article II, section 4 Congress can pass a la
w defining high crimes and misdemeanors.
40
through Executive Actions actions taken by the Pr
esident to clarify Constitutional provisions of
the Executive Branch.
EX from Article II, defining his role as Com
mander-in- Chief defining his role as Chief
Executive
41
through Judicial decisions decisions of the Supr
eme Court clarifying Constitutional questions.
EX Roe v. Wade (1973) Brown v. Board of Edu
cation of Topeka, Kansas (1954)
Olmstead v. U.S. (1928)
42
through Custom and Political Party practices
we continue to do things because we always have
EX the Presidents Cabinet political parties
political conventions
43
FEDERALISM the division of responsibilities bet
ween the Federal government and state
governments.
44
Expressed Powers
  • Those responsibilities given to the federal
    government as granted in the Constitution
  • EX
  • Power to tax
  • Power to raise an army
  • Power to regulate interstate commerce

45
Implied Powers
  • Those not in the Constitution, but reasonably
    implied by the powers that are.
  • Article I, section 8, clause 18
  • necessary and proper clause or elastic clause.

46
Reserved Powers
  • Those responsibilities given to the states

Concurrent Powers
Responsibilities shared by both the federal and
state governments
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