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Innovative Partnerships Program IPP Overview

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Title: Innovative Partnerships Program IPP Overview


1
Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) Overview
Opportunities
  • National Space Grant Director's Meeting
  • October 29, 2007 Las Cruces, New Mexico

Doug Comstock Director, IPP 202
358-2221 doug.comstock_at_nasa.gov
2
About the Innovative Partnerships Program
  • IPP is seeking to add value to NASAs Mission
    Directorates and their programs and projects,
    through technology development and infusion to
    meet mission needs.
  • IPP seeks leveraged funding to address these
    technology barriers via cost-shared,
    joint-development partnerships.
  • IPP Seeks to transfer technology developed by
    NASA for commercial application and other
    benefits to the Nation
  • IPP seeks increased participation from new
    sources of innovation for addressing NASAs
    technology challenges.
  • Facilitator
  • Bringing parties together, both inside and
    outside the agency.
  • Bridging communication gaps.
  • Catalyst
  • Acting as a pathfinder for implementing new
    things change agent.
  • Creating new partnerships.
  • Demonstrating effectiveness of new approaches and
    methods.

3
Program Elements
Technology Infusion
Innovation Incubator
Partnership Development
  • Centennial Challenges
  • New Business Models
  • Innovation Transfusion
  • Intellectual Property management
  • Technology Transfer
  • New Innovative Partnerships
  • SBIR
  • STTR
  • IPP Seed Fund

4
SBIR/STTR 3-Phase Program
  • PHASE I
  • Feasibility study
  • 100K award
  • 6 months duration (SBIR)
  • 12 months duration (STTR)
  • PHASE II
  • Technology Development
  • 2-Year Award
  • Up to 750K (SBIR/STTR)


SBIR is 2.5 of extramural RD, STTR is 0.3 of
extramural RD.
  • PHASE III
  • Technology Infusion/Commercialization Stage
  • Use of non-SBIR Funds
  • Ability to award sole-source contracts without
    JOFOC based on specific SBIR authority NASA and
    NASA primes.

5
SBIR State Information
  • State Information Available on SBIR/STTR Website
  • http//sbir.gsfc.nasa.gov/ SBIR/states.htm

6
SBIR Program 2006 Phase 1 State Distribution of
Awards
7
State Technical Assistance
8
SBIR/STTR Historical Awards
9
2006 Phase 2 STATE DISTRIBUTION OF AWARDS
  • Selections announced October 11, 2007
  • NASA selected 120 proposals for negotiation of
    SBIR Phase 2 contract awards.
  • The selected projects have a total value of
    approximately 72 million.
  • NASA will award the contracts to 102 small high
    technology firms in 27 states.
  • http//sbir.gsfc.nasa.gov/ SBIR/sbir2006/phase2/
    awards/index.html

10
http//sbir.gsfc.nasa.gov/sbirweb/abstracts/absear
ch.jsp
11
SBIR Technologies on Mars Exploration Rovers
Yardney Technical Products of Pawtucket,
Connecticut developed lithium ion batteries with
specific energy of gt100Wh/kg and energy density
of 240 Wh/l and long cycle life. Subsequently,
they won a large Air Force/NASA contract to
develop batteries for space applications. They
are supplying the batteries for the 2003 Mars
Rovers.
Maxwell Technologies of San Diego, California
fabricated and tested an ASCII chip with single
event latch up protection technology. Innovation
enables the use of commercial chip technology in
space missions, providing higher performance at a
lower cost. Supplying A to D converter for Mars
2003 Rovers.
Starsys Research of Boulder, Colorado developed
several paraffin based heat switches that
function autonomously. Heat switches control
radiator for electronics package on Mars 2003
Rovers.
12
SBIR technology contributions to MSL/CheMin
Microwave Power Technology of Campbell,
California developed a small-format carbon
nanotube field emission cathode (CNTFE) X-ray
tube for CheMin. While a tungsten cathode was
ultimately baselined for the flight tube, the
form, fit and function of the flight tube was
derived from this SBIR.
InXitu, Inc. of Mountain View, California
developed a powder handling device for X-ray
Diffraction Analysis based on Piezoelectrically-
induced sample motion, and a miniature X-ray tube
having a grounded cathode configuration is being
developed to enable a further 2-fold reduction in
the size of CheMin prototype instruments.
CheMin MSL 09 Flight Instrument
Miniature grounded-cathode X-ray tube and power
supply
Dual-cell piezoelectric sample shaker
13
SBIR Contribution to Wireless Technology
SCAT SBIR Sensor Control and Acquisition
Telecommunications Wireless Instrumentation
Systems
  • Invocon, Inc.
  • 2006 SBIR Tibbetts Award

Micro-Wireless
Instrumentation Systems
Ultra-WIS
Wing Leading Edge Impact
Detection System
Vehicle Health Monitoring Systems with Wireless
Systems
Wireless Instrumentation and Data Recording
14
IPP Seed Fund
  • Enhance NASAs ability to meet Mission capability
    goals by providing leveraged funding to address
    technology barriers via cost-shared,
    joint-development partnerships.
  • Annual process for selecting innovative
    partnerships for funding.
  • Collaboration of Center IPP Office, NASA co-PI,
    and external co-PI
  • 2006 Seed Fund results
  • 76 proposals received, evaluated by IPP and
    Mission Directorate experts.
  • Relevance/Value to NASA Mission Directorates.
  • Scientific/Technical merit and feasibility.
  • Leveraging of resources.
  • 29 projects selected, providing 28.3 million for
    the advancement of critical technologies and
    capabilities.
  • 6.6 million IPP Office funds.
  • 7.5 million program, project, Center funds.
  • 14.2 million external partner funds.
  • FY 2007 call released May 10, 9.2 million in IPP
    funds.

15
FY06 Seed Fund Statistics and Demographics
35 Total External Partners
10 NASA Field Centers
15 Large Corporations
4 Universities
3 National Laboratories
13 Medium/Small Businesses
16
Seed Fund TRL Advancement
TRL Pre Seed Fund
TRL Post Seed Fund
17
FY06 Demonstration Highlights
Inflatable Human Habitat (Human Lunar)
Cryostable Low-cost Mirror (Deep Space Missions)
Li-Ion Battery for PLSS (Human EVA)
4D Flight Mgmt (NGATS)
Technology Demos
Cryo-tracker Flight Qualification (Atlas/Centaur
Launches)
Inflatable Decelerator (AFL MARS and COTS)
ISHM - Test Stand and J2X Engine (Aries 1 Upper
Stage)
18
How Do Prizes Benefit NASA?
  • Increased Participation by New Sources of
    Innovation
  • Leveraging of Tax-Payers Dollars
  • Innovative Technology Development to Meet NASAs
    Needs
  • Increased Awareness of Science and Technology
  • Hands-on Training for Future Workforce

19
Funded Centennial Challenge Competitions
Personal Air Vehicle Challenge
Regolith Excavation Challenge
Tether Challenge
Astronaut Glove Challenge
Beam Power Challenge
Lunar Lander Challenge
MoonROx Challenge
20
Centennial Challenges 2007 Competitions
21
  • The NASA 50th Anniversary Essay Competition is
    intended for middle and junior high school
    students under the age of 15 during the 2007-2008
    academic year.
  • First prize includes a 5,000 college scholarship
    and 4 VIP trips to the Kennedy Space Center in
    Florida to watch the STS-125 shuttle launch.
  • For more information, visit http//www.nasa.gov/
    audience/foreducators/5-8/features/F_Essay_Competi
    tion.html

22
Essay Topics
  • Students must write an essay, 500 words or less,
    responding to one or both of the following topics
    by January 7th, 2008
  • Topic 1 Describe how you benefit today in
    everyday life due to NASA aerospace technology
    and spinoffs from the last 50 years
  • Topic 2 Describe, 50 years from now, how your
    everyday life may benefit from NASA's future
    aerospace technology

23
Partnership Connections IPP Publications
http//www.techbriefs.com/ Electronics
Computers Semiconductors ICs Mechanics Informati
on Sciences Materials Software Manufacturing
Prototyping Machinery Automation Physical
Sciences Bio-Medical Test Measurement
http//www.sti.nasa.gov/tto/ http//www.sti.nasa.
gov/spinoff/ searchrecord
http//ipp.nasa.gov/innovation/ index.html
http//ipp.nasa.gov/
24
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25
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26
States with Stories in Spinoff 2007
27
Partnership Activities in FY06
  • During FY 2006, the Innovative Partnership
    Program (IPP) facilitated many partnerships and
    agreements, as summarized below
  • Over 200 partnerships with the private sector,
    federal and state government, academia, and other
    entities for dual use technology development and
    reimbursable use of NASA facilities.
  • Over 50 license agreements with private entities
    for commercial and quality of life applications
    of NASA developed technology.
  • Reporting of more than 750 new technologies
    developed by NASA civil servants and contractors,
    and evaluation for patent protection.
  • More than 400 agreements for commercial
    application of software developed by NASA.

28
IPP and Space Grant Opportunities
  • Many IPP activities are being conducted in nearly
    every state.
  • SBIR/STTR
  • Seed Fund Partnerships
  • Centennial Challenge competitions and competitors
  • Technology Transfer
  • Other Partnerships
  • Space Grant Consortia should be aware of ongoing
    activities, and could help encourage
    participation by other firms and universities in
    their respective states, and attendance at IPP
    events.
  • Firms involved in IPP activities may provide an
    important resource to Space Grant Consortia.
  • Participation in Space Grant activities.
  • Employment or internship opportunities.
  • Space Grant Consortia can provide an important
    resource to IPP.
  • Judging 50th Anniversary Essay Contest and other
    activities.
  • There is great potential for mutual benefit from
    working together!

29
How can you learn more or contact IPP?
Go to IPP.NASA.GOV Contact relevant IPP Center
Chief(s)
Center Name Email
Phone
ARC Lisa Lockyer Lisa.L.Lockyer_at_nasa.gov (650)
604-0149 DFRC Gregory Poteat greg.poteat_at_dfrc.nas
a.gov (661) 276-3872 GRC Kathy Needham
Kathleen.K.Needham_at_nasa.gov (216)
433-2802 GSFC Nona Cheeks Nona.K.Cheeks_at_nasa.gov
(301) 286-8504 JPL Ken Wolfenbarger james.k.wol
fenbarger_at_nasa.gov (818) 354-3821 JSC Michele
Brekke michele.a.brekke_at_nasa.gov (281)
483-4614 KSC Dave Makufka David.R.Makufka_at_nasa.g
ov (321) 867-6227 LaRC Marty Waszak
m.r.waszak_at_nasa.gov (757) 864-4015 MSFC Jim
Dowdy Jim.Dowdy_at_nasa.gov (256)
544-7604 SSC Ramona Travis Ramona.E.Travis_at_nasa.g
ov (228) 688-1660
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