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Curriculum Mapping Phases

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Title: Curriculum Mapping Phases


1
Curriculum Mapping Phases
  • Curriculum Map Phases
  • People and their roles
  • Effects on the students
  • How to make Mapping successful at your school

Transforming Our Teaching And Learning Module 3
2
Curriculum Mapping Essential QuestionHow can
curriculum mapping help me guide my students
toward achievement of the standards?
3
Desired Outcomes
Participants will be able to explain and defend
their answers to the following questions
  • Who are we mapping for?
  • Student Targets
  • Special Education and English as a Second
    Language Students
  • Key personnel in the school
  • Who is involved in each phase of the mapping
    process?

4
Who are we curriculum mapping for?
5
Targeting needs Collaborative discussions and
decisions will focus on
  • what is in the best interest of our specific
    clients... the students in our setting
  • their age
  • their stage of development
  • their learning characteristics
  • their communities
  • their aspirations
  • their cumulative educational experiences

6
The Destination
  • Vision of a High School Graduate
  • General Learner Outcomes
  • Hawaii Content and Performance Standards

7
We have our target - how do we get there?
  • Understanding the Phases of Curriculum Mapping..
  • the beginning of the Journey

8
Professional Materials
Recommended Viewing Putting Mapping to Work by
ASCD, with Heidi Hayes Jacobs Follow-up Chart
your understandings on Notetaking/Notemaking
Worksheet
9
How to implement the curriculum mapping process?
10
Each School will need to approach mapping
systematically
  • Apply the curriculum mapping process to create
    Projected Maps, Diary Maps, Consensus Maps, to
    guide and inform instruction (in all content
    areas)
  • Use data to make decisions

11
First Time Mapping Advice
  • First time advice
  • Concentrate on one discipline or content area
    or strand when first mapping.
  • Add others in subsequent years.
  • Choose initial focus based on data - identified
    student needs.
  • Technology can assist in data collection.

12
All Maps consistently include
  • Essential Questions
  • Content Standards
  • Skills
  • Assessments
  • Materials or Resources (optional)
  • Lessons (optional)
  • Accommodations (optional)

13
Curriculum Data
  • What do we collect?
  • Essential Questions
  • Content
  • Skills
  • Assessments
  • Lessons
  • Alignment to Standards

DATA - collected in mapping software
14
Professional Materials
  • Handouts
  • Considerations for a Quality Map (Mapping
    Features)
  • Rubric for Curriculum Map Entries
  • Blooms Verb Wheel
  • Blooms Taxonomy

15
Blooms VerbsAnd Matching Assessment Types
Remember that your verbs need to be seeable
/measurable. No knew/knows,
understood/understands,
used/uses, or demonstrated/demonstrates.
Blooms Verbs And Matching Assessment Types
Remember that your verbs need to be
seeable/measurable. No knew/knows,
understood/understands,
used/uses, or demonstrated/demonstrates.
Remember that your verbs need to be
seeable/measurable. No knew/knows,
understood/understands,
used/uses, or demonstrated/demonstrates.
Remember that your verbs need to be
seeable/measurable. No knew/knows,
understood/understands,
used/uses, or demonstrated/demonstrates.
Remember that your verbs need to be
seeable/measurable. No knew/knows,
understood/understands,
used/uses, or demonstrated/demonstrates.
16
Blooms Taxonomy
17
Blooms Taxonomy Continued
18
Considerations for a Quality Map
  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
  • What overarching questions will serve to guide
    instruction and push students to higher levels of
    thinking?
  • What overarching questions might help students to
    link or connect a BIG IDEA or topic to other
    concepts and/or subjects?
  • What specific questions might guide teaching and
    engage students in uncovering what is the heart
    of each BIG IDEA/topic?
  • What questions point beyond the unit to other
    transferable ideas/concepts?
  • How are your essential questions, skills and
    assessments connected or hooked?

19
  • CONTENT
  • What is the BIG IDEA/broad topic you will be
    covering?
  • What are the major subcategories (chunks) on
    which you will spend a significant amount of
    time?
  • What are the major underlying concepts for your
    BIG IDEA/broad topic?
  • Are descriptive nouns (i.e., improper fractions
    as opposed to fractions or United States Civil
    War as opposed to civil war)

20
  • SKILLS
  • What are the enabling skills or processes that
    will ensure successful mastery of the BIG IDEA?
  • What skills do students need to be successful at
    demonstrating the BIG IDEA, broad topic and/or
    concepts?
  • On what skills do you spend a significant amount
    of time?
  • Have you included the benchmarks and critical
    skills from the state standards?
  • Are seeable, measurable verbs. Refer to Blooms
    taxonomy to drive for higher levels of thinking.
    Do not use verbs such as know, understand, or
    use. They are not truly measurable.

21
  • ASSESSMENTS
  • What would you accept as evidence that students
    understand the BIG IDEA, broad topic, and/or
    concept?
  • What product or performance will the student
    produce?
  • Do the assessments allow students to demonstrate
    their learning or understanding on multiple ways?
  • LESSONS
  • As you consider skills, what practice activities
    would you use to help students learn the concept?
  • What specific support materials, books, field
    trips, videos or web sites do you use or
    incorporate in your teaching?

22
The Process Phases of Curriculum Mapping
  • Phase 1 Collecting the data
  • Phase 2 First read-through
  • Phase 3 Small mixed group review
  • Phase 4 Large group comparisons
  • Phase 5 Determine immediate revision points
  • Phase 6 Determine points requiring research
  • and planning
  • Phase 7 Plan for next review cycle

23
The 1st Phase of Curriculum Mapping
24
PHASE 1 OUTCOME DIARY MAP
  • Is written by each teacher individually
  • Provides a record of what is actually taught
  • Provides data regarding the real curriculum
  • Is not used for teacher performance evaluation

25
The 2nd Phase of Curriculum Mapping
26
PHASE 2 OUTCOME REFLECTION
  • Each member of the faculty gets a better picture
    of what is happening in the whole school
  • Areas for future examination are flagged
  • Repetitions, gaps, scaffolds, cycles are
    illuminated
  • Disconnected assessments are noted
  • Misaligned curriculum and standards are
    identified.
  • Potential areas for integration are recognized.

27
The 3rd Phase of Curriculum Mapping
28
Read Through Discussion Questions Include
  • How does our sequence match with the standards
    and the state tests?
  • Does our content build sequentially in terms of
    complexity and understanding for students?
  • Do our skills spiral appropriately in relation to
    the content?
  • Is there any content or skills that we should be
    teaching differently?

29
  • First Read-Through Summary Form
  • This form will be used as a guideline to help you
    read through the curriculum maps for the first
    time. As you read the maps, it is important to
    focus on a few vital aspects dealing with the
    content and skills sections.
  • Directions As you read through a series of maps,
    record the pertinent information under each of
    the categories below. Use the examples in each
    category as a guide.
  • Grade Level of Maps__________________ Subject
    ________________________
  • Gaps Found Where/What Grade
  • Ex. Fractions (One class teaches to 1/2, two
    4th
  • classes teach to 1/8, and one made no
  • mention of fractions)
  • Ex. Two classes used "listed" as a skill, and
    5th
  • two used "describe" for the content of steps
  • of mealworm life cycle.
  • Redundancies Found Where/What Grade
  • Ex. Life cycle of butterflies K-4
  • Ex. All grades used "identify" for the content
    4-6
  • of shapes

30
Debriefing
  • What new learnings did group members encounter?
  • What concerns do group members have?
  • What questions do group members have?
  • What agreements were reached regarding entry
    format and abbreviations?
  • What revisions have you decided to present to the
    other groups for consideration in regards to the
    curriculum?

31
Hands on Activity
Vertical Team Review Follow the process for
Vertical Team Review as specified by the Protocol
in mixed teams. Record responses on the Response
Sheet.
32
Professional Materials
  • Handouts
  • By Karen Budan, TechPaths
  • Sample Vertical Team Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Sample Horizontal Team Read-Through Review
    Protocol?

33
CURRICULUM MAPPING Vertical Team
Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Complete items noted on the Vertical Team
    Read-Through Response Sheets.
  • Convene to the table or location your team is
    assigned.
  • Appoint a facilitator.
  • Appoint a recorder.

34
CURRICULUM MAPPING Vertical Team
Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Option One based on Available Time
  • Each teacher distributes copies of their map
    report.
  • Teachers individually read the maps. Look for
  • Maps were written in such a way that you are
    clear about what the students experienced
  • Ah hahs - What was something you learned?
  • Possible gaps
  • Possible repetitions
  • Questions related to items on the curriculum maps
    that may need to be addressed

35
CURRICULUM MAPPING Vertical Team
Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Appoint a time keeper.
  • Using a round robin format, the facilitator will
    ask each member of the group to take one minute
    and highlight aspects of his/her map.
  • Facilitator will ask the group to focus
    individually on each person's map in order and
    note feedback on each of the following areas
  • ah hahs - What was something you learned?
  • possible gaps
  • possible repetitions
  • questions related to items on the curriculum maps
    that may need to be addressed

36
CURRICULUM MAPPING Vertical Team
Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Option Two based on Available Time
  • Each teacher distributes copies of their maps to
    each member of their vertical team.
  • Teachers individually read the maps of their team
    members.
  • That the maps were written in such a way that you
    are clear about what the students experienced
  • Ah hahs - What was something you learned?
  • Possible gaps
  • Possible repetitions
  • Questions related to items on the curriculum maps
    that may need to be addressed

37
CURRICULUM MAPPING Vertical Team
Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Responses recorded on large paper by the
    recorder. After everyone passes, the facilitator
    proceeds on to the next person's map and repeats
    the process until everyone's map has been
    reviewed.
  • Individual members of the team should record the
    responses on their response sheets.
  • After everyone's map has been reviewed, the group
    should discuss the items recorded and asterisk
    the priority areas.
  • Vertical Team Read-Through Response Sheet

38
Hands on Activity
Horizontal Team Review Follow the process for
Horizontal Team Review as specified by the
Protocol in grade level teams. Record responses
on the Response Sheet.
39
Vertical Team Read-Through Response Sheet
  • Ah Hahs --- What was something learned?
  • Possible gaps identified
  • Possible repetitions identified
  • Questions related to items on the maps that may
    need to be addressed

40
CURRICULUM MAPPING Horizontal Team
Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Complete the items noted on the Horizontal Team
    Read-Through Response Sheets.
  • Convene to the table or location your team is
    assigned.
  • Appoint a facilitator .
  • Appoint a recorder.

41
CURRICULUM MAPPING Horizontal Team
Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Option One based On Available Time
  • Each teacher distributes copies of their map
    report to each member of their vertical team.
  • Teachers individually read the maps of their team
    members.
  • Address the following questions
  • What is essential for students to address in
    content and skills?
  • Are there agreed upon assessments?
  • What do we address that may be unnecessary or
    developmentally not appropriate?
  • Establish formats for map entries.

42
CURRICULUM MAPPING Horizontal Team
Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Option Two based On Available Time
  • Each teacher distributes copies of their map
    report.
  • Teachers individually read the maps of their team
    members. Address the following questions
  • What is essential for students to address in
    content and skills?
  • Are there agreed upon assessments that show
    evidence of student proficiency in the above
    content/skills?
  • What do we address that may be unnecessary or
    developmentally not appropriate?
  • Establish formats for map entries.
  • Appoint a time keeper to keep the group
    focused/on task.

43
CURRICULUM MAPPING Horizontal Team
Read-Through Review Protocol
  • Using a round robin format, the facilitator will
    ask each member of the group to highlight aspects
    of his/her map.
  • Next, the facilitator will ask the group to focus
    on each of the focus questions
  • Culmination of the discussion should be recorded
    and provided to the leadership in terms of
  • Agreed upon essential content and skills
  • Agreed upon assessments
  • Any places of question or disagreement
  • Any observations for consideration

44
CURRICULUM MAPPING Horizontal Team
Read-Through Horizontal Team Read-Through
Response Sheet
  • Agreed upon essential content and skills
  • Any places or question or disagreement
  • Any observations for consideration
  • Questions related to items on the maps that may
    need to be addressed.

45
PHASE 3 OUTCOME REPORTING OUT
  • Identification of redundancies, gaps,
    questionable or inappropriate assessment,
    misalignment with standards, and potential areas
    for integration.
  • Identification of areas that need attention
  • Collection and compilation of members findings
    on recording sheets

46
The 4th Phase of Curriculum Mapping
47
  • Conversations with Teachers to Analyze
  • Cause Effect Relationships
  • Generate Hypotheses

48
Data-Driven Decisions
Curriculum Data
Assessment Data
Student Achievement
Reporting
49
PHASE 4 OUTCOME LARGE GROUP REVIEW
  • Share small group findings
  • Group unite in accomplishing two tasks
  • 1) Identify what can be accomplished relatively
    immediately and easily
  • 2) Determine what things will need more study
    and attention
  • Once those things that require more consideration
    and time decide whether a taskforce needs to be
    created to address it.

50
The 5th Phase of Curriculum Mapping
51
PHASE 5 OUTCOME IMMEDIATE REVISIONS
  • Once the tasks that can be accomplished
    relatively immediately and easily are identified
    in Phase 5 solutions or corrections are defined
    and implemented.
  • Smaller breakout groups can be created to do
    immediate revision or done on the spot during
    large Phase 4 session.

52
The 6th Phase of Curriculum Mapping
53
PHASE 6 OUTCOME RESEARCH PLANNING
  • Areas needing more research and planning will be
    addressed by a taskforce.

54
The 7th Phase of Curriculum Mapping
55
PHASE 7 OUTCOME PLAN NEXT REVIEW CYCLE
  • Based on the data from completed cycle, plan for
    next cycle (example Another content area)

56
Next Steps
  • Individual revisions
  • Feedback taken to Horizontal Team
  • Continued refinement as you move through ensuing
    Read-Throughs scheduled through-out the year
  • Continued development of consensus on elements
    for each course

57
Analysis of Maps in Light of Student Assessment
Data
  • Question Were the assessment items covered in
    the curriculum?
  • Question When were they covered?
  • Question How frequently?
  • Question What kind of lessons prepared students
    to answer these items?
  • Question What attending essential questions,
    contents, and skills were used in conjunction
    with these items?

58
Rubric for Curriculum Map Entries
59
Rubric for Implementation of Mapping
60
How to establish a foundation for the
curriculum mapping process?
61
When Professional Learning Communities
collaborate to create curriculum maps, this
unified effort increases student achievement.

62
Why create Professional Learning Communities?
  • No more teaching in isolation
  • Open communication
  • Sharing and collaboration
  • Use of data removes subjectivity
  • Professional learning communities establish the
    foundation for CURRICULUM MAPPING

63
  • What is missing from the knowledge base for
    teaching, therefore, are the voices of teachers
    themselves, the questions teachers ask, the ways
    teachers are writing and intentional talk in
    their work lives, and the interpretive frames
    teachers use to understand and improve their own
    classroom practices.
  • Cochran-Smith Lyle

64
Building the Teaching/Learning Environment
  • Focus for change should be small and lead to
    efficacy
  • Small professional communities should focus on
    teaching and learning
  • Extended communities should network to broaden
    the knowledge and perspective

65
Lessons learned regarding accountability
  • Educators need to believe in efficacy it will
    matter for student learning
  • Data must be credible alignment must be made
    between curriculum, instruction and assessment
    for data to have credibility
  • Collaboration based on data requires analytic
    capabilities and sometimes external expertise

66
Teacher Isolation
  • The crush..of our myriad daily events and duties
    keep us from collaborating on such obvious and
    challenging concerns as how to teach composition
    more effectively, and how to make literature more
    excitingand so we work consciously and
    unconsciously toward our own goals, within the
    limitations of what each of us know or do not
    know.

67
Milbrey McLaughlin findings
  • Throughout our ten-year study, whenever we found
    an effective school or an effective department
    within a school, without exception that school or
    department has been a part of a collaborative
    professional learning community

68
Fred Newmann
  • If schools want to enhance their capacity to
    boost student learning, they should work on
    building a collaborative culture..when groups,
    rather than individuals, are seen as the main
    units for implementing curriculum, instruction,
    and assessment, they facilitate development of
    shared purposes for student learning and
    collective responsibility to achieve it.

69
Attributes of Professional Learning Communities
  • Inquiry-based
  • Focused on student learning
  • Goal and results oriented
  • Collaborative
  • Reflective
  • Based on shared values and beliefs
  • Committed to continuous improvement

Fullan, Murphy and Lick, Eaker, Dufour, and
Burnette, Glickman, Newmann, Schmoker
70
Who Should Develop Their Own Maps
  • All teachers who have students assigned to them
    as the teacher of record for that course
  • All teachers who hold responsibility for the
    primary delivery of instruction for the students
    assigned to their classroom

71
  • If a teacher collaborates with other teachers to
    deliver instruction or instructional support
    within the context of the other teachers
    classrooms...such as
  • Special Education
  • ESLL
  • Gifted/Talented
  • Library
  • Technology

72
Differentiation
  • Happens at the lesson levelnot at the map level.
  • Content and skills need to be the same for all
    students
  • The differentiation reflects the modifications
    that need to be made to the content and skills
    for specific students
  • Differentiation should be based on data

73
Curriculum Mappingis the Process, Mapping
Software is the Tool
74
How can technology help in the curriculum
mapping process?
75
How can technology assist?
  • Some possibilities
  • Incorporating (layering) individual, school,
    complex maps
  • Aligning with state standards
  • Retrieving data from multiple maps, sources
  • Sharing different websites
  • Visiting and exploring different sites

76
Four Curriculum Mapping Software Options
77
Atlas Rubicon
Jan Burreson jburreson_at_rubicon.com www.rubiconat
las.com
78
Curriculum Mapper
  • Charla Bennett
  • chrlab_at_curriculummapper.com
  • Phone 800-318-4555 ext 131
  • FAX 630-455-4144
  • Website http//www.curriculummapper.com

79
Lotus Notes Database
  • Daryl Ishihara
  • Kapalama Elementary School, Honolulu District
  • Via Lotus Notes

80
Curriculum Mapping Options
Karen A. Budan, Ed.D. Technology Pathways
International Office 480-247-6465 Cell
480-250-3926 karen_at_techpaths.com
81
A few things to keep in mind
  • Software cant make you smarter, and it cant
    read your mind. But as a tool, a computer system
    is a vital part to any business because it
    manages information. So, maybe software can make
    you smarter if you let it help you make better
    decisions.
  • While the software is crucial, there still has to
    be a good process behind it. That means you have
    to have some sort of process your team follows to
    make sure that the data corresponds with what is
    actually happening.
  • Adapted from article by Jennifer Duffield White,
    Grower Talks, May 2005, page62.

82
Activity
Reflect on
Road Blocks in this challenge
83
ReflectionsDate ___________Module
________________
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