Edward G. Rendell Gerald L. Zahorchak, D. Ed. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Edward G. Rendell Gerald L. Zahorchak, D. Ed.


1
  • Edward G. Rendell Gerald L.
    Zahorchak, D. Ed.
  • Governor Secretary

2
Teacher Certification Update, HOUSSE Bridge
Equitable Teacher Distribution
  • http//www.pde.state.pa.us
  • Linda J. Benedetto, Chief, Division of Teacher
    Quality, Bureau of School Leadership and Teacher
    Quality

3
Participants will learn
  • About PAs new certification requirements
  • About new grade level configurations

4
Participants will learn
  • When new certifications will be issued to
    teachers and administrators
  • About HOUSSE Bridge other avenues for
    teachers to become highly qualified

5
Participants will learn
  • About school district responsibilities for the
    HOUSSE rubric and Individual Professional
    Development Plans and
  • About equitable teacher distribution purpose,
    components, why it is important.

6
New Teacher Certificates New Grade Levels
  • Special Education
  • PK-8
  • Special Education
  • 7-12
  • PK-4
  • 4-8

7
The Architecture Standards-Aligned System
8
New Program Requirements
  • Beginning in January 2011 all Instructional and
    Educational Specialist preparation programs must
    include
  • Special Education 9 credits or 270 hours
  • English Language Learner 3 credits or 90 hours

9
New Teacher Certificates Issued
  • On or after January 1, 2013 must
  • Complete requirements for any of the new
    certification programs
  • Include Special Education and ELL requirements
    and

10
Dual Certification Now Required for Special
Education
  • PK-8
  • PK-4
  • 4-8
  • Reading Specialist
  • 7-12
  • Secondary content area
  • Reading Specialist

11
New Certificates Will Require
COLLABORATION
  • Arts Sciences
  • Early Childhood
  • Elementary
  • Special Education
  • PreK-12 Teachers and Administrators

Across all departments
Possibly co-teaching
12
A Brief Look at the
NEW
  • Program Guidelines

13
Program Guidelines
  • Model curriculum presented
  • Several different models were recommended by each
    workgroup
  • Richer content focus
  • Obtained feedback via regional meetings

14
Elementary/Middle Level Professional Core
  • Developed to address the broad set of issues and
    knowledge applicable to middle level teaching and
    learning
  • Middle level cognitive development
  • Early adolescent development learning theory
  • Assessment
  • Middle level instructional methodology
  • Special Education ELL requirements

15
4-8 Current-Option 1Single Area Concentration
16
4-8 Current-Option 1Single Area Concentration
17
4-8 Current-Option 1Single Area Concentration
  • Appendix A in the 4-8 Program Specific Guidelines
    present single area concentration for
    English/Language Arts Science and Social
    Studies.
  • See Tables A1-2, A1-3 and A1-4 on pages 36-37 of
    the 4-8 Program Guidelines at http//www.teaching.
    state.pa.us/teaching/lib/teaching/Grades4-8Program
    Guidelines.pdf

18
4-8 Current-Option 2Two Areas of Concentration
19
4-8 Current-Option 2Two Areas of Concentration
20
4-8 Current-Option 2Two Areas of Concentration
  • Appendix A in the 4-8 Program Specific Guidelines
    present two areas of concentration for Math
    English/Language Arts Reading Math Social
    Studies Science English/Language Arts
    Reading Science and Social Studies.
  • See Tables A2-2, A2-3 and A2-4 on pages 38-39 of
    the 4-8 Program Guidelines at http//www.teaching.
    state.pa.us/teaching/lib/teaching/Grades4-8Program
    Guidelines.pdf

21
To Be Included in ALL Program Guidelines
  • Definitions of the assessment types to ensure
    that all new teachers know what they are and when
    to use them
  • Authentic
  • Screening
  • Diagnostic
  • Formative
  • Benchmark
  • Summative

22
Included in ALL Program Guidelines
  • Field Experiences must be
  • EARLY
  • OFTEN
  • STRUCTURED
  • Observe
  • Assist
  • Teach
  • Student Teach

Observe Assist Teach Student teach
23
Included in ALL Program Guidelines
  • Cognitive student development applicable to each
    grade level

24
PAs Highly Qualified Teacher Requirements
25
PAs Highly Qualified Teacher Requirements
  • Derived from provisions in No Child Left Behind
  • All public school teachers with primary
    responsibility for direct instruction in one or
    more of the following core academic subjects
  • English Geography
  • Reading/ Civics Government
  • Language Arts Economics
  • Mathematics History
  • Science Arts
  • Foreign
  • Language

26
In Pennsylvania, who is HQT?
  • ALL Elementary Certified Teachers who received
    Instructional certification and who currently
    teach ELEMENTARY students (see Note for State
    HOUSSE plan that enables EL ED teachers certified
    PRIOR to 1988 to be HQT)

27
In Pennsylvania, who is HQT?
  • ALL Middle Secondary Core Content Teachers who
    currently teach IN THEIR CORE ACADEMIC SUBJECT
    and instruct students in GRADES 7-12

28
In Pennsylvania, who is HQT?
  • ALL ESL teachers who hold an Instructional I in
    the CORE ACADEMIC SUBJECT they are instructing
    and who teach ESL populations
  • ALL ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION teachers who hold an
    Instructional I in the CORE ACADEMIC SUBJECT they
    are instructing and who teach ALT ED populations

29
In Pennsylvania, who is HQT?
  • ALL Special Education Certified Teachers who are
    teaching ELEMENTARY LEVEL Special Education
    Students or students taking an Alternative
    Assessment and who took and passed the Praxis
    Fundamental Subjects or its predecessor (thus
    proving subject matter competency)

30
How Do PA Teachers Become HQT?
  • To satisfy the definition of a highly qualified
    teacher, public school teachers must
  • Hold at least a bachelors degree
  • Hold a valid Pennsylvania teaching certificate
    (i.e., Instructional I, Instructional II or
    Intern certificate but not an emergency permit)
    and
  • Demonstrate subject matter competency for the
    core academic subjects they teach.

31
What If a Teacher is Not HQT?
  • There are three basic ways for teachers to
    demonstrate subject matter competency
  • Pass the Praxis! (ALL teachers)
  • Complete a graduate degree or subject area major
    (Middle and Secondary teachers)
  • National Board for Professional Teaching
    Standards Certification (NOT New to the
    Profession, 3 years experience)

32
The Tricky Part Demonstration of Subject Matter
Competency
  • Demonstrate subject matter competency for the
    core academic subjects they teach.
  • In PA, subject area competency is traditionally
    demonstrated through the successful completion of
    the appropriate Praxis exams.
  • Thus, the FASTEST way to achieve HQT status is
    to TAKE THE TEST!

33
What is HOUSSE?
  • Highly Objective Uniform State Standard of
    Evaluation
  • It enabled experienced teachers who taught
    multiple core content and
  • Who did NOT have the appropriate Instructional
    Certificate in the CORE ACADEMIC SUBJECT to
    accumulate 100 points on the HOUSSE Rubric to
    earn an HQT Designation
  • HOUSSE IS NOT A PROGRAM TO EARN CERTIFICATION,
    RATHER IT IS AN HQT DESIGNATION.

Teachers teaching multiple core content
Special Education ESL Alternative Education
34
HOUSSE - Flexibility Under IDEA
  • New (first-year) special education teachers
  • who teach multiple core academic subjects in
    middle or secondary settings and who have a
    content certificate
  • have passed a content test, or hold a degree in
    math, science, or language arts
  • have up to two years from their date of hire to
    demonstrate content expertise in the remaining
    core academic subject(s) they teach.
  • These teachers may use PAs HQT HOUSSE to accrue
    100 points in each remaining core academic
    subject or may pass relevant core academic
    subject exam(s).

35
What if teachers were not highly qualified by
June 30, 2007?
  • Any teacher who did not accumulate 100 points on
    the HOUSSE rubric must develop, in consultation
    with his/her school district, an Individualized
    Professional Development Plan (IPDP) to attain
    highly qualified teacher status by December 31,
    2008.

36
HQT Individualized Professional Development Plan
The teacher and the district must create the HQT
Individualized Professional Development Plan
(IPDP) before June 30, 2007. The teacher must
complete the HQT Individualized Professional
Development Plan (IPDP) on or before December 31,
2008.
37
District responsibilities for HOUSSE or IPDPs
  • Validate accuracy of teachers HOUSSE Rubric,
    certificate status, transcripts of academic
    courses for content, professional development
    experiences
  • Meet regularly with teachers to monitor and
    discuss their progress on completing their IPDP
    and thus earning 100 points on the HOUSSE rubric
  • Maintain a copy of each teachers signed HOUSSE
    Rubric and IPDP

38
District responsibilities for HOUSSE or IPDPs
  • Maintain notes relating to meetings held to
    discuss progress on IPDP
  • Sign HOUSSE Rubric after IPDP is completed
  • Submit individual teacher records via the PA
    Department of Educations of website
    www.teaching.state.pa.us
  • for educators to attain HQT designation.

39
HQT and IPDP
  • Teachers who are neither highly qualified nor
    engaged in an Individual Professional Development
    Plan should not be assigned as the teacher of
    record for a core content subject area.

40
BRIDGE Phase I and II
  • PAs Bridge certificate is a HOUSSE process
    developed to assist teachers to become highly
    qualified.
  • PAs Bridge closed July, 2006.
  • Unless teachers are ALREADY on the Bridge, they
    may not use the PA Bridge to become highly
    qualified.
  • Once on the bridge, a teacher must make progress
    by earning 30 points from the date of entering
    the Bridge program.
  • Teachers have 3 years from the date they entered
    the Bridge program to complete it and achieve an
    Instructional I certification.

41
Equitable Teacher Distribution
  • Requirements and Expectations

42
What is an equitable distribution plan
  • 2 provisions of ESEA help us understand the
    purpose of and responsibilities associated with
    an equitable distribution plan
  • Section 1111(b)(8)(C) of the ESEA (pertains to
    State Education Agencies)
  • Section 1112(c)(1)(L) of the ESEA (pertains to
    LEAs)

43
Section 1111(b)(8)(C) of ESEA states that
  • each SEA plan must include steps that the State
    educational agency will take to ensure that poor
    and minority children are not taught at higher
    rates than other children by inexperienced,
    unqualified, or out-of-field teachers, and the
    measures that the State educational agency will
    use to evaluate and publicly report the progress
    of the State educational agency with respect to
    such steps.

44
Section 1112(c)(1)(L) of the ESEA states that
each LEA plan must include an assurance that the
LEA will ensure, through incentives for
voluntary transfers, the provision of
professional development, recruitment programs,
or other effective strategies, that low-income
students and minority students are not taught at
higher rates than other students by unqualified,
out-of-field, or inexperienced teachers.
45
Who Must Develop an Equitable Teacher
Distribution Plan
  • All LEAs must develop an equitable teacher
    distribution plan
  • Even if they have
  • Achieved 100 HQT and
  • Met AYP

46
This means that
  • LEAs and SEAs must analyze data
  • to identify why teachers are not highly
    qualified
  • to determine if novice (less experienced)
    teachers are concentrated in specific schools

47
This means that
  • to measure progress
  • to determine if strategies in the plan are
    working or should be changed
  • to revisit the plan regularly and update as
    needed.

48
PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • Schools in urban areas are more likely to have
    higher numbers of non-HQT
  • High-poverty schools have the greatest proportion
    of assignments taught by non-HQTs

Math (22) Science (22) Foreign language
(20) Social studies (17) English (16)
49
PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • As poverty-level, racial/ethnic minority
    enrollment and the proportion of assignments
    taught by non-HQTs increase, the mean of
    students reading and math performance gradually
    decline

50
PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • As the percentage of minority students increases,
    non-HQT assignments also increase
  • PA schools with higher poverty-levels are more
    likely to have higher numbers of non-HQT than
    those with lower poverty-levels

51
PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • Schools not making AYP have the greatest
    percentage of assignments taught by non-HQTs
  • v Social Studies (15) v Math (9)
  • v Science (13) v English (6)
  • v Foreign Languages (10)

52
PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • Elementary schools not making AYP have the
    greatest proportion of assignments taught by
    non-HQTs in
  • Art (2)
  • ECE/Elementary (2)
  • Foreign Language (14)
  • Middle level schools not making AYP have greatest
    proportion of non-HQT assignments in
  • Math (9)
  • English (7)
  • Science (7)
  • Social Studies (5)

53
PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • Secondary schools not making AYP have greatest
    proportion of non-HQT assignments in
  • Math (9)
  • Science (7)
  • Foreign
  • Languages (7)
  • Social Studies
  • (5)
  • English (5)
  • Art (3)

54
PAs Strategies Include
  • Deploying a team of Distinguished Educators
    working with schools
  • Deploying a team of Distinguished SLs to work
    with schools
  • Establishing partnerships
  • Offering professional development opportunities
    at no cost to schools or teachers Governors
    Academy for Urban Education and other Governors
    Institutes

55
PAs Strategies Include
  • Requiring all teacher and education specialist
    certification programs to include components that
    will enable them to accommodate and adapt
    instruction for diverse students in an inclusive
    setting and meet the instructional needs of
    English Language Learners

56
PAs Strategies Include
  • Working with novice school administrators to
    enhance their knowledge and skills
  • PA Inspired Leadership GROW Component
  • Principals Leadership Induction Program
  • Revising PAs certification program guidelines
    for principals and superintendents

57
PAs Strategies Include
  • Implementing the Call Me Mister Program to
    increase the number of African-American males
    teaching in the elementary grades

58
PAs Strategies Include
  • Urban Educators Recruitment Program
  • Provides scholarships to postsecondary students
    committing to teaching in urban schools 5 years
  • Identifies critical shortages of certified
    teachers for PA urban areas
  • Provides informational sessions and experiential
    programs for middle level and high school
    students to encourage them to pursue teaching
    careers

59
PAs Strategies Include
  • Meeting with representatives from various
    educational organizations and teacher unions to
    garner
  • Understanding of equitable teacher distribution
  • Support for schools as they implement strategies
    to evenly distribute their teacher resources
    across the district
  • Ideas for recruitment and retention, incentives,
    etc.

60
PAs Strategies Include
  • Incorporating teacher equitable distribution into
    its School Improvement planning document Getting
    Results
  • Incorporating differentiated teacher induction
    support for novice teachers (e.g., those with lt 3
    years of teaching experience)
  • Incorporating teacher equitable distribution in
    its strategic plan requirements

61
What Can LEAs do
  • Identify where inequities in teacher assignments
    exist
  • Review school-level data on teacher turnover to
    identify characteristics of teachers who have
    left and whether or not they move to another
    school or leave the profession
  • Tap into pools of teachers and individuals who
    would be willing to be teachers and then
    distribute them equitably - paraprofessionals
  • Use resources wisely to retain teachers

62
What Can LEAs do
  • Improve conditions in hard-to-staff schools
    working as well as classroom environment
  • Streamline district recruitment and hiring
    practices
  • Develop strong collaborations with colleges and
    universities to develop grow your own teacher
    recruitment strategies to encourage high school
    students to pursue the teaching profession
  • Build the capacity of school leaders to support
    teachers in hard-to-staff schools

63
What Can LEAs do
  • Assign teachers to areas where they will be HQT
  • Encourage non-HQT teachers to participate in
    on-line PRAXIS preparation program offered by
    PaTTAN
  • Work with local union representatives
  • Establish professional development schools with
    nearby college or university

64
What Can LEAs do
  • Involve experienced teachers in decision-making
  • Promise to pay for advanced educational pursuits
    if experienced teachers agree to work in hard to
    staff schools
  • Use experienced teachers as mentors and classroom
    coaches for novice teachers

65
What Can LEAs do
  • Collaborate with schools that have similar
    student populations to learn what steps they are
    taking to recruit and retain highly qualified and
    experienced teachers

66
What Else Can LEAs do
  • What other strategies might be beneficial to
    high-poverty, high-minority LEAs as they wrestle
    with how to equitably distribute teacher quality
    resources among and between their schools?

67
Resources to Assist LEAs
  • National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality
    (www.ncctq.org)
  • Americas Challenge Effective Teachers for
    At-Risk Schools and Students available at
    http//www.ncctq.org/publications/NCCTQBiennialRep
    ort.php

68
(No Transcript)
69
(No Transcript)
70
(No Transcript)
71
Why does equitable teacher distribution matter
  • You know

FOR THE KIDS!
72
(No Transcript)
73
Office of Postsecondary and Higher EducationDr.
Kathleen M. Shaw, Deputy Secretary Bureau of
School Leadership and Teacher Quality Theresa
Barnaby, Director Division of Teacher
Quality Linda J. Benedetto, Chief
74
  The Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE)
does not discriminate in its educational
programs, activities or employment practices
based on race, color, national origin, sex,
sexual orientation, disability, age, religion,
ancestry, union membership, or any other legally
protected category. This policy is in accordance
with state law, including Pennsylvanias Human
Relations Act, and with federal law, including
Title IV and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of
1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of
1972, Section 504 of the rehabilitation Act of
1973, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of
1967 and the American Disabilities Act of 1990.
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Edward G. Rendell Gerald L. Zahorchak, D. Ed.

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Title: Edward G. Rendell Gerald L. Zahorchak, D. Ed.


1
  • Edward G. Rendell Gerald L.
    Zahorchak, D. Ed.
  • Governor Secretary

2
Teacher Certification Update, HOUSSE Bridge
Equitable Teacher Distribution
  • http//www.pde.state.pa.us
  • Linda J. Benedetto, Chief, Division of Teacher
    Quality, Bureau of School Leadership and Teacher
    Quality

3
Participants will learn
  • About PAs new certification requirements
  • About new grade level configurations

4
Participants will learn
  • When new certifications will be issued to
    teachers and administrators
  • About HOUSSE Bridge other avenues for
    teachers to become highly qualified

5
Participants will learn
  • About school district responsibilities for the
    HOUSSE rubric and Individual Professional
    Development Plans and
  • About equitable teacher distribution purpose,
    components, why it is important.

6
New Teacher Certificates New Grade Levels
  • Special Education
  • PK-8
  • Special Education
  • 7-12
  • PK-4
  • 4-8

7
The Architecture Standards-Aligned System
8
New Program Requirements
  • Beginning in January 2011 all Instructional and
    Educational Specialist preparation programs must
    include
  • Special Education 9 credits or 270 hours
  • English Language Learner 3 credits or 90 hours

9
New Teacher Certificates Issued
  • On or after January 1, 2013 must
  • Complete requirements for any of the new
    certification programs
  • Include Special Education and ELL requirements
    and

10
Dual Certification Now Required for Special
Education
  • PK-8
  • PK-4
  • 4-8
  • Reading Specialist
  • 7-12
  • Secondary content area
  • Reading Specialist

11
New Certificates Will Require
COLLABORATION
  • Arts Sciences
  • Early Childhood
  • Elementary
  • Special Education
  • PreK-12 Teachers and Administrators

Across all departments
Possibly co-teaching
12
A Brief Look at the
NEW
  • Program Guidelines

13
Program Guidelines
  • Model curriculum presented
  • Several different models were recommended by each
    workgroup
  • Richer content focus
  • Obtained feedback via regional meetings

14
Elementary/Middle Level Professional Core
  • Developed to address the broad set of issues and
    knowledge applicable to middle level teaching and
    learning
  • Middle level cognitive development
  • Early adolescent development learning theory
  • Assessment
  • Middle level instructional methodology
  • Special Education ELL requirements

15
4-8 Current-Option 1Single Area Concentration
16
4-8 Current-Option 1Single Area Concentration
17
4-8 Current-Option 1Single Area Concentration
  • Appendix A in the 4-8 Program Specific Guidelines
    present single area concentration for
    English/Language Arts Science and Social
    Studies.
  • See Tables A1-2, A1-3 and A1-4 on pages 36-37 of
    the 4-8 Program Guidelines at http//www.teaching.
    state.pa.us/teaching/lib/teaching/Grades4-8Program
    Guidelines.pdf

18
4-8 Current-Option 2Two Areas of Concentration
19
4-8 Current-Option 2Two Areas of Concentration
20
4-8 Current-Option 2Two Areas of Concentration
  • Appendix A in the 4-8 Program Specific Guidelines
    present two areas of concentration for Math
    English/Language Arts Reading Math Social
    Studies Science English/Language Arts
    Reading Science and Social Studies.
  • See Tables A2-2, A2-3 and A2-4 on pages 38-39 of
    the 4-8 Program Guidelines at http//www.teaching.
    state.pa.us/teaching/lib/teaching/Grades4-8Program
    Guidelines.pdf

21
To Be Included in ALL Program Guidelines
  • Definitions of the assessment types to ensure
    that all new teachers know what they are and when
    to use them
  • Authentic
  • Screening
  • Diagnostic
  • Formative
  • Benchmark
  • Summative

22
Included in ALL Program Guidelines
  • Field Experiences must be
  • EARLY
  • OFTEN
  • STRUCTURED
  • Observe
  • Assist
  • Teach
  • Student Teach

Observe Assist Teach Student teach
23
Included in ALL Program Guidelines
  • Cognitive student development applicable to each
    grade level

24
PAs Highly Qualified Teacher Requirements
25
PAs Highly Qualified Teacher Requirements
  • Derived from provisions in No Child Left Behind
  • All public school teachers with primary
    responsibility for direct instruction in one or
    more of the following core academic subjects
  • English Geography
  • Reading/ Civics Government
  • Language Arts Economics
  • Mathematics History
  • Science Arts
  • Foreign
  • Language

26
In Pennsylvania, who is HQT?
  • ALL Elementary Certified Teachers who received
    Instructional certification and who currently
    teach ELEMENTARY students (see Note for State
    HOUSSE plan that enables EL ED teachers certified
    PRIOR to 1988 to be HQT)

27
In Pennsylvania, who is HQT?
  • ALL Middle Secondary Core Content Teachers who
    currently teach IN THEIR CORE ACADEMIC SUBJECT
    and instruct students in GRADES 7-12

28
In Pennsylvania, who is HQT?
  • ALL ESL teachers who hold an Instructional I in
    the CORE ACADEMIC SUBJECT they are instructing
    and who teach ESL populations
  • ALL ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION teachers who hold an
    Instructional I in the CORE ACADEMIC SUBJECT they
    are instructing and who teach ALT ED populations

29
In Pennsylvania, who is HQT?
  • ALL Special Education Certified Teachers who are
    teaching ELEMENTARY LEVEL Special Education
    Students or students taking an Alternative
    Assessment and who took and passed the Praxis
    Fundamental Subjects or its predecessor (thus
    proving subject matter competency)

30
How Do PA Teachers Become HQT?
  • To satisfy the definition of a highly qualified
    teacher, public school teachers must
  • Hold at least a bachelors degree
  • Hold a valid Pennsylvania teaching certificate
    (i.e., Instructional I, Instructional II or
    Intern certificate but not an emergency permit)
    and
  • Demonstrate subject matter competency for the
    core academic subjects they teach.

31
What If a Teacher is Not HQT?
  • There are three basic ways for teachers to
    demonstrate subject matter competency
  • Pass the Praxis! (ALL teachers)
  • Complete a graduate degree or subject area major
    (Middle and Secondary teachers)
  • National Board for Professional Teaching
    Standards Certification (NOT New to the
    Profession, 3 years experience)

32
The Tricky Part Demonstration of Subject Matter
Competency
  • Demonstrate subject matter competency for the
    core academic subjects they teach.
  • In PA, subject area competency is traditionally
    demonstrated through the successful completion of
    the appropriate Praxis exams.
  • Thus, the FASTEST way to achieve HQT status is
    to TAKE THE TEST!

33
What is HOUSSE?
  • Highly Objective Uniform State Standard of
    Evaluation
  • It enabled experienced teachers who taught
    multiple core content and
  • Who did NOT have the appropriate Instructional
    Certificate in the CORE ACADEMIC SUBJECT to
    accumulate 100 points on the HOUSSE Rubric to
    earn an HQT Designation
  • HOUSSE IS NOT A PROGRAM TO EARN CERTIFICATION,
    RATHER IT IS AN HQT DESIGNATION.

Teachers teaching multiple core content
Special Education ESL Alternative Education
34
HOUSSE - Flexibility Under IDEA
  • New (first-year) special education teachers
  • who teach multiple core academic subjects in
    middle or secondary settings and who have a
    content certificate
  • have passed a content test, or hold a degree in
    math, science, or language arts
  • have up to two years from their date of hire to
    demonstrate content expertise in the remaining
    core academic subject(s) they teach.
  • These teachers may use PAs HQT HOUSSE to accrue
    100 points in each remaining core academic
    subject or may pass relevant core academic
    subject exam(s).

35
What if teachers were not highly qualified by
June 30, 2007?
  • Any teacher who did not accumulate 100 points on
    the HOUSSE rubric must develop, in consultation
    with his/her school district, an Individualized
    Professional Development Plan (IPDP) to attain
    highly qualified teacher status by December 31,
    2008.

36
HQT Individualized Professional Development Plan
The teacher and the district must create the HQT
Individualized Professional Development Plan
(IPDP) before June 30, 2007. The teacher must
complete the HQT Individualized Professional
Development Plan (IPDP) on or before December 31,
2008.
37
District responsibilities for HOUSSE or IPDPs
  • Validate accuracy of teachers HOUSSE Rubric,
    certificate status, transcripts of academic
    courses for content, professional development
    experiences
  • Meet regularly with teachers to monitor and
    discuss their progress on completing their IPDP
    and thus earning 100 points on the HOUSSE rubric
  • Maintain a copy of each teachers signed HOUSSE
    Rubric and IPDP

38
District responsibilities for HOUSSE or IPDPs
  • Maintain notes relating to meetings held to
    discuss progress on IPDP
  • Sign HOUSSE Rubric after IPDP is completed
  • Submit individual teacher records via the PA
    Department of Educations of website
    www.teaching.state.pa.us
  • for educators to attain HQT designation.

39
HQT and IPDP
  • Teachers who are neither highly qualified nor
    engaged in an Individual Professional Development
    Plan should not be assigned as the teacher of
    record for a core content subject area.

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BRIDGE Phase I and II
  • PAs Bridge certificate is a HOUSSE process
    developed to assist teachers to become highly
    qualified.
  • PAs Bridge closed July, 2006.
  • Unless teachers are ALREADY on the Bridge, they
    may not use the PA Bridge to become highly
    qualified.
  • Once on the bridge, a teacher must make progress
    by earning 30 points from the date of entering
    the Bridge program.
  • Teachers have 3 years from the date they entered
    the Bridge program to complete it and achieve an
    Instructional I certification.

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Equitable Teacher Distribution
  • Requirements and Expectations

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What is an equitable distribution plan
  • 2 provisions of ESEA help us understand the
    purpose of and responsibilities associated with
    an equitable distribution plan
  • Section 1111(b)(8)(C) of the ESEA (pertains to
    State Education Agencies)
  • Section 1112(c)(1)(L) of the ESEA (pertains to
    LEAs)

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Section 1111(b)(8)(C) of ESEA states that
  • each SEA plan must include steps that the State
    educational agency will take to ensure that poor
    and minority children are not taught at higher
    rates than other children by inexperienced,
    unqualified, or out-of-field teachers, and the
    measures that the State educational agency will
    use to evaluate and publicly report the progress
    of the State educational agency with respect to
    such steps.

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Section 1112(c)(1)(L) of the ESEA states that
each LEA plan must include an assurance that the
LEA will ensure, through incentives for
voluntary transfers, the provision of
professional development, recruitment programs,
or other effective strategies, that low-income
students and minority students are not taught at
higher rates than other students by unqualified,
out-of-field, or inexperienced teachers.
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Who Must Develop an Equitable Teacher
Distribution Plan
  • All LEAs must develop an equitable teacher
    distribution plan
  • Even if they have
  • Achieved 100 HQT and
  • Met AYP

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This means that
  • LEAs and SEAs must analyze data
  • to identify why teachers are not highly
    qualified
  • to determine if novice (less experienced)
    teachers are concentrated in specific schools

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This means that
  • to measure progress
  • to determine if strategies in the plan are
    working or should be changed
  • to revisit the plan regularly and update as
    needed.

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PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • Schools in urban areas are more likely to have
    higher numbers of non-HQT
  • High-poverty schools have the greatest proportion
    of assignments taught by non-HQTs

Math (22) Science (22) Foreign language
(20) Social studies (17) English (16)
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PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • As poverty-level, racial/ethnic minority
    enrollment and the proportion of assignments
    taught by non-HQTs increase, the mean of
    students reading and math performance gradually
    decline

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PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • As the percentage of minority students increases,
    non-HQT assignments also increase
  • PA schools with higher poverty-levels are more
    likely to have higher numbers of non-HQT than
    those with lower poverty-levels

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PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • Schools not making AYP have the greatest
    percentage of assignments taught by non-HQTs
  • v Social Studies (15) v Math (9)
  • v Science (13) v English (6)
  • v Foreign Languages (10)

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PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • Elementary schools not making AYP have the
    greatest proportion of assignments taught by
    non-HQTs in
  • Art (2)
  • ECE/Elementary (2)
  • Foreign Language (14)
  • Middle level schools not making AYP have greatest
    proportion of non-HQT assignments in
  • Math (9)
  • English (7)
  • Science (7)
  • Social Studies (5)

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PAs Non-HQT Data Tell Us
  • Secondary schools not making AYP have greatest
    proportion of non-HQT assignments in
  • Math (9)
  • Science (7)
  • Foreign
  • Languages (7)
  • Social Studies
  • (5)
  • English (5)
  • Art (3)

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PAs Strategies Include
  • Deploying a team of Distinguished Educators
    working with schools
  • Deploying a team of Distinguished SLs to work
    with schools
  • Establishing partnerships
  • Offering professional development opportunities
    at no cost to schools or teachers Governors
    Academy for Urban Education and other Governors
    Institutes

55
PAs Strategies Include
  • Requiring all teacher and education specialist
    certification programs to include components that
    will enable them to accommodate and adapt
    instruction for diverse students in an inclusive
    setting and meet the instructional needs of
    English Language Learners

56
PAs Strategies Include
  • Working with novice school administrators to
    enhance their knowledge and skills
  • PA Inspired Leadership GROW Component
  • Principals Leadership Induction Program
  • Revising PAs certification program guidelines
    for principals and superintendents

57
PAs Strategies Include
  • Implementing the Call Me Mister Program to
    increase the number of African-American males
    teaching in the elementary grades

58
PAs Strategies Include
  • Urban Educators Recruitment Program
  • Provides scholarships to postsecondary students
    committing to teaching in urban schools 5 years
  • Identifies critical shortages of certified
    teachers for PA urban areas
  • Provides informational sessions and experiential
    programs for middle level and high school
    students to encourage them to pursue teaching
    careers

59
PAs Strategies Include
  • Meeting with representatives from various
    educational organizations and teacher unions to
    garner
  • Understanding of equitable teacher distribution
  • Support for schools as they implement strategies
    to evenly distribute their teacher resources
    across the district
  • Ideas for recruitment and retention, incentives,
    etc.

60
PAs Strategies Include
  • Incorporating teacher equitable distribution into
    its School Improvement planning document Getting
    Results
  • Incorporating differentiated teacher induction
    support for novice teachers (e.g., those with lt 3
    years of teaching experience)
  • Incorporating teacher equitable distribution in
    its strategic plan requirements

61
What Can LEAs do
  • Identify where inequities in teacher assignments
    exist
  • Review school-level data on teacher turnover to
    identify characteristics of teachers who have
    left and whether or not they move to another
    school or leave the profession
  • Tap into pools of teachers and individuals who
    would be willing to be teachers and then
    distribute them equitably - paraprofessionals
  • Use resources wisely to retain teachers

62
What Can LEAs do
  • Improve conditions in hard-to-staff schools
    working as well as classroom environment
  • Streamline district recruitment and hiring
    practices
  • Develop strong collaborations with colleges and
    universities to develop grow your own teacher
    recruitment strategies to encourage high school
    students to pursue the teaching profession
  • Build the capacity of school leaders to support
    teachers in hard-to-staff schools

63
What Can LEAs do
  • Assign teachers to areas where they will be HQT
  • Encourage non-HQT teachers to participate in
    on-line PRAXIS preparation program offered by
    PaTTAN
  • Work with local union representatives
  • Establish professional development schools with
    nearby college or university

64
What Can LEAs do
  • Involve experienced teachers in decision-making
  • Promise to pay for advanced educational pursuits
    if experienced teachers agree to work in hard to
    staff schools
  • Use experienced teachers as mentors and classroom
    coaches for novice teachers

65
What Can LEAs do
  • Collaborate with schools that have similar
    student populations to learn what steps they are
    taking to recruit and retain highly qualified and
    experienced teachers

66
What Else Can LEAs do
  • What other strategies might be beneficial to
    high-poverty, high-minority LEAs as they wrestle
    with how to equitably distribute teacher quality
    resources among and between their schools?

67
Resources to Assist LEAs
  • National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality
    (www.ncctq.org)
  • Americas Challenge Effective Teachers for
    At-Risk Schools and Students available at
    http//www.ncctq.org/publications/NCCTQBiennialRep
    ort.php

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Why does equitable teacher distribution matter
  • You know

FOR THE KIDS!
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Office of Postsecondary and Higher EducationDr.
Kathleen M. Shaw, Deputy Secretary Bureau of
School Leadership and Teacher Quality Theresa
Barnaby, Director Division of Teacher
Quality Linda J. Benedetto, Chief
74
  The Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE)
does not discriminate in its educational
programs, activities or employment practices
based on race, color, national origin, sex,
sexual orientation, disability, age, religion,
ancestry, union membership, or any other legally
protected category. This policy is in accordance
with state law, including Pennsylvanias Human
Relations Act, and with federal law, including
Title IV and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of
1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of
1972, Section 504 of the rehabilitation Act of
1973, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of
1967 and the American Disabilities Act of 1990.
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