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Good Morning

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Title: Good Morning


1
  • Good Morning!

2
Welcome to the
  • NSTA Regional Conference
  • Portland, Oregon
  • November 22, 2008

3
Using Science Notebooks to Uncover Student
Understanding
  • Mark Emmet
  • NCOSP
  • Western Washington University

4
Contact Info
  • Mark.Emmet_at_gmail.com
  • 1-360-961-7726

5
Overview
  • What is NCOSP?
  • Sciencenotebooks.org
  • Intro to Science Notebooks
  • Assessing Student Notebooks
  • Standards-Based Resources
  • Questions and Answers

6
Question
  • What do you hope your students will gain as a
    result of using science notebooks in your
    classroom?
  • Discuss this question with a few of your
    neighbors.

7
  • How do you know when these gains have been
    realized?
  • Discuss this question with a few of your
    neighbors.

8
What is NCOSP?
  • Answer
  • The North Cascades and Olympic Science Partnership

9
What is NCOSP?
  • Five Year (2004-2008) National Science Foundation
    funded grant at Western Washington University in
    Bellingham, WA
  • Five Institutes of Higher Education
  • 28 School Districts
  • 160 Public Schools

10
NCOSP Goals
  • All students succeed in challenging science
    curriculum aligned with standards.
  • Administrators understand and support science
    education reform goals and programs.
  • Knowledgeable and confident teachers use
    curriculum with integrity and fidelity.

11
NCOSP Goals (Cont.)
  • The quantity, quality and diversity of teachers
    entering the workforce increases through
    effective recruitment, preparation, and
    retention.
  • Science education research provides
    evidence-based contributions to the learning and
    teaching knowledge base.

12
NCOSP Leadership
  • Pinky Nelson (Principal Investigator)
  • George.Nelson_at_wwu.edu
  • Carolyn Landel (Project Director)
  • Carolyn.Landel_at_wwu.edu
  • Shannon Warren (Professional Development
    Coordinator)
  • Shannon.Warren_at_wwu.edu

13
www.sciencenotebooks.org
  • A Web-Based Resource designed to support
    teachers in their quest to effectively use
    science notebooks in their classrooms.

14
www.sciencenotebooks.org
15
Sciencenotebooks.org
  • Search for samples of student work from science
    classroom notebooks by any of the following
    filters
  • Grade Band
  • Discipline
  • Publisher (e.g. FOSS, STC, BSCS)
  • Entry Type
  • Student Context (e.g. advanced placement, special
    education, English language learners, etc.)

16
Intro to Science Notebooks
  • A PPt Presentation available on the NCOSP
    Website designed to help teachers get started
    using Science Notebooks in their own classrooms.

17
Intro to Science Notebooks Key Aspects
  • Understanding first hand experiences compared to
    2nd or 3rd hand experiences
  • Common Attributes of Student Science Notebooks
  • How scientists use notebooks in the real word
  • Common Entry Types (Formats/Purpose)
  • Student samples

18
Common Entry Types Samples
  • ENTRY TYPE Graphic Organizers

19
THE BOX T-CHART
Similarities Differences
Pencil Marker
Betsy Rupp Fulwiler
20
Box T-Chart
21
ENTRY TYPE Writing Frames
22
Rupp Fulwiler, Betsy. 2007. Writing in Science.
Portsmouth, NH Heinemann.
23
ENTRY TYPE Investigation
Formats
24
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25
Intro to Science Notebooks
  • An additional important aspect is to introduce
    participants to the key findings in How People
    Learn, and help them make connections between
    these findings and their students work.

26
Intro to Science Notebooks
  • The presentation concludes with a discussion of
    assessment (including self- assessment) and
    provides participants with a set of rubrics for
    use in the classroom.

27
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28
Using Science Notebooks to Examine Student
Thinking Mark EmmetPeggy Harris Willcuts
29
Goals
  • Deepen understanding of the nature and purpose of
    science notebook entry types.
  • Examine entry types for their connection to
    research on How People Learn
  • Evidence of prior knowledge
  • Evidence of factual/conceptual knowledge
  • Evidence of understanding their own learning
    process
  • Begin to discuss instructional implications based
    on analysis of student work.
  • Link to larger work of the science notebooks
    website.

30
  • Flow Chart

Characteristics of Entry Types
Student Proficiency with Entry Types
Student Conceptual Proficiency
Instructional Implications
31
Who is Here?
  • Teachers
  • Primary
  • Intermediate
  • Middle School
  • High School
  • Others
  • Administrators
  • Higher Ed
  • Informal Science
  • Pre-Service
  • Other

32
Experience with Looking at Student Notebooks
  • Who has
  • tried a few entry types with students?
  • been using science notebooks for months?
  • examined student entries on your own?
  • examined student notebooks with colleagues?

33
Initial Ideas
  • What might we learn by looking at student work
    in science notebooks?
  • Stop and jot
  • Turn and talk (table level)

34
Responses from Others
  • We might learn
  • whether students are proficient in using a
    number of entry types
  • how different entry types allow students to
    express their understanding
  • whether students are expressing misconceptions
    or gaps in their understanding
  • to consider what interventions may be necessary
    to address these issues.

35
  • Flow Chart

Characteristics of Entry Types
Student Proficiency with Entry Types
Student Conceptual Proficiency
Instructional Implications
36
Science Notebook Entry Types and Their
Characteristics
  • Grab a handout and a highlighter. Working with an
    elbow partner
  • In the left column, highlight key characteristics
    of each Entry Type.
  • In the right column, enter those key words in the
    blank spaces.
  • Discuss any discrepancies you encountered

37
Whole Group Share
38
Reviewing Entry Types
  • What characteristics help you to distinguish
    among these three entry types?
  • Drawings
  • Tables, Charts, and Graphs
  • Graphic Organizers

Share
Group
Think
39
Entry Type Sample
  • Tables, Charts, and Graphs
  • Definition Formats for recording and organizing
    data, results, and observations.
  • Purpose Students use table and charts to
    organize information in a form that is easily
    read and understood. Recording data in these
    forms facilitates record keeping. Students use
    graphs to compare and analyze data, display
    patterns and trends, and synthesize information
    to communicate results.

40
Reviewing Entry Types (cont).
  • What characteristics help you to distinguish
    between these two entry types?
  • Reflective and Analytical Entries
  • Writing Frames

Share
Group
Think
41
Reviewing the Mini Science Notebook
  • Use post-it notes to identify the types of
    entries present in the Mini Science Notebook.
  • Check with your table group to see if you agree
    on the
  • Entry Types
  • Key Characteristics present in each entry

42
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45
Key Points
  • Helping students to use the SNB conventions
    allows them the opportunity to communicate their
    message and/or understanding
  • The edges between the entry types can be fuzzy
    at times. Thats OK!

46
  • Flow Chart

Characteristics of Entry Types
Student Proficiency with Entry Types
Student Conceptual Proficiency
Instructional Implications
47
Analyzing Student Samples - Part I
  • Using the cover of the packet of student samples
  • Record Entry Type on Data Sheet
  • Mark Grade Level
  • Discuss and list characteristics

48
  • Student Work Samples
  • Packet A
  • Scientific Illustrations
  • Grade 8

49
Assignment Specifications
  • SCIENTIFIC ILLUSTRATION
  • All parts of the investigation drawn in detail
  • Show the entire system and all of its parts
  • Parts labeled
  • Label all parts used and call them by their
    scientific name
  • Accurate indication of the complete circuit
  • Bulb, wires, electrodes, electrolyte
  • REFLECTIONS
  • Energy flow (transfer/transformation)
  • Types of energy found in the system
  • Indicators of a chemical reaction

50
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56
Analyzing Student Samples - Part II
  • Examine the packet of student samples.
  • Which characteristics of the entry type does each
    student sample demonstrate?
  • Which characteristics of the entry type are
    missing from each student sample?
  • Record your findings using the Analyzing Student
    Entries Students Use of Science Notebooks
    Conventions data sheet.

57
Analyzing Your Student Samples
  • Select about six random student notebooks.
  • Choose one common entry.
  • Which characteristics of the entry type does each
    student sample demonstrate?
  • Which characteristics of the entry type are
    missing from each student sample?
  • Record your findings using the Analyzing Student
    Entries Students Use of Science Notebooks
    Conventions data sheet.

58
What patterns are evident to you?
59
Examining the Range of Entry Types
  • Choose one student notebook randomly.
  • Use post-it notes to create an inventory of the
    number and frequency of all entry types
    represented in a single month
  • Tally your findings on the Entry Type Document

60
Examining the Range of Entry Types
  • What does your inventory reveal or suggest to
    you? Why?
  • Are you seeing a wide variety of entry types
    represented in your tally?
  • If not, what instructional implications might
    this have for your practice?

61
  • Flow Chart

Characteristics of Entry Types
Student Proficiency with Entry Types
Student Conceptual Proficiency
? yes
? no
Instructions for Conventions
Instructional Implications
62
  • Flow Chart

Characteristics of Entry Types
Student Proficiency with Entry Types
Student Conceptual Proficiency
Instructional Implications
63
How People Learn, 1999
If education is to help students make sense of
their surroundings and ready them for the
challenges of the technology-driven,
internationally competitive world, then it must
be based on what we know about learning from
science.
64

How People Learn - Key Finding I Students come
to classrooms with preconceptions about how the
world works. If their initial understanding is
not engaged, they may fail to grasp the new
concepts and information that are taught, or they
may learn them for purposes of a test but revert
to their preconceptions outside the classroom.
65
  • How People Learn Key Finding II
  • To develop competence in an area of inquiry,
    students must
  • have a deep foundation of factual knowledge
  • understand facts and ideas in the context of a
    conceptual framework
  • organize knowledge in ways that facilitate
    retrieval and application.

66
How People Learn - Key Finding III A
metacognitive approach to instruction can help
students learn to take control of their own
learning goals and monitor their progress in
achieving them.
67
A Question to Chew On
  • Are all entry types equally effective in
    supporting all three principles of How People
    Learn?

68
How People Learn Analysis
  • Select 3 different Entry Types from 3 different
    notebooks where all (or nearly all) the
    characteristics of those entry types are
    demonstrated
  • Using Analyzing Entry Types vis-à-vis HPL PHASE
    II Science Notebooks, complete pp. 1 and 2.

69
How People Learn Analysis
  • As you work through the Analyzing Entry Types
    document, discuss with your elbow partner what
    you are seeing and recording.

70
How People Learn Analysis
  • When youve completed recording your findings,
    discuss with your elbow partner what you gained
    from looking at the three entries in terms of
  • Questions/concerns
  • Surprises
  • Insights

71
  • Flow Chart

Characteristics of Entry Types
Student Proficiency with Entry Types
Student Conceptual Proficiency
Instructional Implications
72
Considering Instructional Implications
  • Lets consider the implications the following
    scenarios may have for your instruction

73
Instructional Implications Scenarios
  • What would the instructional implications be if
    you found
  • that a few individual students did not have an
    accepted scientific understanding of the concept
    you were targeting?
  • that a large number of students show particular
    misconceptions of a gate keeper lesson?
  • Medium to high frequency of student responses
    without fully developed conceptual understanding,
    but you knew that several subsequent lessons in
    your unit addressed these issues?

74
From Novice to Expert
Expert Novice
C o m p e t e n c y
Designing Professional Development for Teachers
of Science and Mathematics, Susan Loucks-Horsley,
et.al., Corwin Press, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA
1998, 0-8039-6661-X (cloth), 0-8039-6662-8 (paper)
75
Reflection
  • What did we learn by looking at student work
    from science notebooks today?
  • How might you consider involving your colleagues
    in this science notebook analysis?

76
Responses to Reflection
  • Usefulness of common student work
  • OK to look at different entries, too
  • Patterns (frequencies) in student understanding
  • Variety of entries was surprising (cool!)
  • Criteria (conventions) for each entryuseful
  • Looking back helps us to look forward (planning
    for effective use of SNB)
  • Intention!
  • Need for conventions vs. conceptual
    understanding
  • Use of conventions leads to communication
  • Tools for helping students develop communication
    abilities

77
Team Time SNB Level II
  • Consider your local context
  • What specific issues or obstacles will you want
    to address?
  • What aspects of the presentation do you want to
    make sure you highlight?
  • What modifications to the presentation might be
    appropriate in your locale?
  • How will you include the science notebooks
    website in your presentation?

78
Team Time SNB Level II
  • The SNB Level II presentation has a high
    cognitive load for participants.
  • What indicators would you look for in your region
    which would let you know your potential audience
    is ready for this work?
  • What support might you lend classroom teachers
    after SNB Level I to prepare them for SNB Level
    II?

79
Consider Your Context
  • Mechanical Conceptual
  • How will you be explicit in helping participants
    move toward a more conceptual use of science
    notebooks in their classrooms?

80
Reflect
  • Are there any specific additions, deletions, or
    modifications youve made to the Science Notebook
    Level II presentation that you think might be
    useful for others in the room to hear about?

81
Next Steps
  • The next step could be to examine your
    curriculum through the lens of the National
    Science Standards. Using the following resources
    may help you
  • Identify specific learning targets
  • Consider commonly held misconceptions
  • Decide on evidence of understanding

82
M
M
Available Online
Pertinent to Mathematics
M
M
M
83
Collaboration
  • How might your assessment of student work in
    science notebooks be enhanced by working
    collaboratively with your colleagues?

84
Questions?
85
  • Thank you!
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