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21st Century Skills and the Arts

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The Role of the Arts and Arts Integration in Teaching. Revised Framework For ... All the Flowers Gone?' by ... like half of a valentine. STEP 8: HAIR ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: 21st Century Skills and the Arts


1

2
Revised Framework For 21st Century Learning
3
ACTIVITY
  • How do the arts teach the 21st century themes and
    skills?
  • Be prepared to SHARE!

4
Core Subjects
  • English, Reading or Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Foreign Languages
  • Civics
  • Government
  • Economics
  • ARTS
  • History and
  • Geography (NCLB)

5
21st CENTURY THEMES
  • Global Awareness
  • Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial
    literacy
  • Civic Literacy
  • Health Literacy

6
Global Awareness Writing Theatre Arts
  • Identify some of the characters and ideas from
    the commedia dellarte, and write an essay that
    compares it to a similar style of theatre from
    another century (for example, Molieres comedies,
    slapstick comedy of the early 1900s, etc.).

7
Global Awareness Writing Visual Arts
  • Students identify and discuss certain firsts in
    art
  • Research the contributions of an artist from
    another country and write a paper about the
    artist. Two examples are listed here
  • Graciela Rodo-Boulanger of Bolivia
  • Lim Kok Boon of Indonesia

8
Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial
Literacy Math Music
  • Share the budget with the students. It will
    address
  • Knowing how to make appropriate personal
    economic choices.

9
Sample Budget
10
Civic Literacy Social Studies Music
  • The learner will explore examples of and
    opportunities for active citizenship, past and
    present, at the local and state levels. Grade 8
    SCS
  • Research songs from the past that were composed
    for the sake of political protest. Discuss their
    meanings and their purposes. Some examples are
  • Blowin in the Wind by Bob Dylan
  • War by Edwin Starr
  • Where Have All the Flowers Gone? by Pete Seeger
  • Compose a song of your own that tackles one of
    todays issues using appropriate notation, time
    signature, and expressive devices.

11
Health Literacy Physical Education Science
Dance
  • The learner will conduct investigations, use
    models, simulations, and appropriate technologies
    and information systems to build an understanding
    of the complementary nature of the human body
    system. Grade 7 SCS
  • Conduct a mini-unit on kinesiology, addressing
    specific muscle groups affected most by dance,
    including specific treatments for sore muscles.
  • Students should know who to contact in case of
    emergencies such as broken or fractured bones,
    dizziness, etc.
  • Make sure to provide a diagram of the
    musculoskeletal system and have students identify
    muscles and tendons affected by specific dance
    movements.
  • http//www.geocities.com/vienna/strasse/5503/danc
    etips.html (Dance Tips).

12
Learning and Innovation Skills
  • Creativity and Innovation Skills
  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills
  • Communication and Collaboration Skills

13
Creativity/Innovation Skills Writing Dance
  • Give students a list of creative choices
    connected to new ideas that evolved as a result
    of necessity (e.g., creating the first
    automobile). Students then establish a structure
    of creative inventiveness.
  • Create dance movements that communicate their
    processes.
  • Write an essay that explains the steps in their
    creative approach.
  • Revise and perform their dances. As an
    extension, relate how the steps they took are
    similar to the ways inventors/discoverers/
  • technicians approach creative solutions (or
    should approach creative solutions) to their
    problems.

14
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Science
Math Visual Arts
  • Fibonacci numbers are used in art, architecture,
    and music. They also appear in nature
    everywhere.

http//fy.chalmers.se/kuzmin/HOBBY/TABLE/STORY/Im
age31.gif
15
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Science
Math Theatre Arts
  • Stage lighting students must understand
    electricity. They must also know mathematical
    formulas
  • The pie formula P IE or W VA (watts
    equals volts time amps)
  • Many other arrangements are also suitable for
    solving specific problems. For example
  • P I/E I2R E2/R
  • R E/I E2/P P/I2


www.charles.kaiser.name/lighting2.htm
16
Communication/Collaboration Writing Visual
Arts
  • Distribute drawing paper and assign a theme.
  • Each student draws for one minute then passes
    his/her paper to the next person. The next
    student adds his/her own ideas to the picture.
    This continues around the room until the paper
    ends up with the student who started the drawing.
  • As a follow-up, students use narrative writing to
    describe how they felt throughout the process,
    including their feelings about how their pictures
    evolved and whether or not the originator was
    satisfied with the end product.

17
Communication/Collaboration Skills
Writing/Speaking Music
  • Record the group singing or playing a piece of
    music.
  • In small, collaborative groups, evaluate the
    quality and effectiveness of the performance
    using specific criteria and offer constructive
    suggestions for improvement.
  • Explain in writing how each individual's part
    contributes to the overall sound quality of the
    group. Examine how the director communicates to
    the ensemble in order to facilitate the
    collaborative performance of the piece (tempo,
    dynamics, blend, balance, etc).

18
Information, Media, and Technology Skills
  • Information Literacy
  • Media Literacy
  • ICT (Information, Communications, and Technology)
    Literacy

19
Information Literacy Writing Dance
  • Assign historical dance figures for students to
    research, such as Pierre Rameau, Carlo Blasis,
    Jerome Robbins, Agnes DeMille, Alvin Ailey, Twyla
    Tharp, Mikhail Baryshnikov, and Martha Graham.
    Supply students with specific questions to help
    them determine the credibility of their
    resources. Two sample questions might be
  • How recently was the article about your topic
    published?
  • Does it cover the topic in enough depth?
  • Students need to evaluate their sources
    carefully, and select only the sources that are
    reliable, accurate, and authoritative based on
    specific criteria.

20
Media Literacy Reading Music
  • Lead a discussion about how different media
    portrays popular music (e.g., feature news
    stories on broadcast news, editorials, newspaper
    articles, etc.). Get a variety of perspectives.
    Ask leading questions such as
  • How does the writer view particular artists whose
    albums and singles have reached the top 40 in the
    charts?
  • Does the feature or article seem to be biased
    towards specific types of popular music?
  • How do you think the feature or article will
    affect the publics view of the music?

21
ICT Literacy Writing Arts
  • Discuss the role of publicist (for a dramatic
    production, dance recital, choral recital, art
    exhibition, etc.).
  • Have students act as publicists to compose a
    publicity package using various applications on
    the computer. The student will become familiar
    with
  • creating and transferring files
  • transferring digital images to email attachments
  • inserting hyperlinks

22
Life and Career Skills
  • Flexibility and Adaptability
  • Initiative and Self-Direction
  • Social and Cross-Cultural Skills
  • Productivity and Accountability
  • Leadership and Responsibility

23
Flexibility and Adaptability Writing Visual
Arts
  • During the course, a student will work with many
    different art materials, and each material will
    have its own characteristics. The student will
    constantly have to adapt the way s/he works with
    each medium. Provide instruction to ensure that
    each student becomes familiar with each mediums
    characteristics and correct application.
  • Select two media and have students compare the
    two media. Write about the consistency, texture,
    pliability, ease of use, etc. of each medium.
    Describe the advantages and disadvantages of each
    medium.

24
Initiative and Self-Direction Writing Music
  • Help all students, K-12, understand that learning
    extends beyond the classroom and that there are
    many benefits and opportunities for involvement
    in music such as
  • Careers professional musician, composer,
    teacher, producer, publisher, music therapist,
    music industry careers, etc.
  • Benefits health and mental fitness, social
    music, self-expression, therapy
  • Other appreciation of music listening to
    music physical, social, emotional, intellectual
    and aesthetic influence of music as it addresses
    various learning styles and intelligences
  • Have students select a category and do a research
    report.

25
Social and Cross-Cultural Skills Science
Theatre Arts
  • Discuss the scientific principles of color theory
    as they pertain to stage lighting. Have students
    divide into small groups.
  • Each group is to select a concept of stage
    lighting theory and prepare models, computer
    simulations, or other means of presentation, to
    test hypotheses relating to the concept.
    Examples may include
  • Gels (color filters) can dramatically transform
    colors onstage.
  • Principles of reflection, refraction, and
    absorption create varying effects onstage.

26
Productivity and Accountability Music
  • Have students listen to a recording of themselves
    singing or playing composed or original works of
    music (or, use a recording of a piece of music).
  • Collaboratively develop criteria for evaluating
    the quality and effectiveness of the performance
    or composition. This may be done by developing a
    rubric as a class. This rubric may then be used
    by students to apply the jointly developed
    criteria in their own personal listening and
    performing of music.

27
Leadership and Responsibility Language Arts
Theatre Arts
  • The role of the narrator is powerful.
  • Leadership
  • Responsibility
  • Every student should have the opportunity to
    develop the skills to become narrators before the
    end of the class.

28
21st Century Support Systems
  • Standards
  • Assessment (Formative and Summative)
  • Professional Development
  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Learning Environments

29
Making Authentic Connections
  • Incorporates each content area in a meaningful
    context (as appropriate and maintaining the
    integrity of each discipline)
  • Contains measurable student outcome(s)

30
What do math and the arts have in common?
31
COMPETENCY GOAL 2 The learner will understand
and use perimeter and area.
  • Perimeter Dance
  • Using forward, back, and lateral Latin dance
    steps, students will create "Perimeter" dances in
    which they dance in a square or rectangle and
    calculate the perimeter and area of their dances.
    As an extension, students will analyze the
    relationship of perimeter and area, creating
    multiple dances with the same area.

32
Math in Your Feet
  • Dance is considered creative. Math is considered
    to be mostly problem solving. Both rely on
    creativity to solve problems.
  • Dance patterns can be charted (choreography).
    Dance steps include many variables and patterns.
    Shapes and geometric concepts can be and are
    often used in choreography.
  • Math in Your Feet is a program that teaches
    math using dance.

33
Music and Sound Waves
  • When composing music, students will have to
    understand the musical scales including sharps
    and flats, frequency, etc. For example
  • A-440 (hertz) is the A above middle C.
  • Frequencies between half tones is
    1.0594630943593...
  • To calculate the frequency of A, multiply 440
    hertz by 1.059. The answer will be 466.16376...
  • If this is repeated 12 times, it will place you
    at an octave higher, which would be 880 hertz.
    Doubling the frequency creates a note an octave
    higher. Dividing the frequency in half creates a
    note an octave lower.
  • The movement from one note to another is a
    constant 1.059463 therefore, students are able
    to calculate the number of vibrations per second
    between two random notes.

34
Composition and Time Signatures
  • Students will create original compositions
    within specific guidelines and perform their
    compositions for the class. Compositions will be
    notated using traditional methods.
  • http//64.78.42.182/sweethaven/Arts/MusicTheory/l
    essonmain.asp?lesNum3modNum2
    ?

35
Set Design for the Stage


  • Students lay out a grid for the perspective
    sketch using precise measurements.
  • Students determine scale for models of the set
    and have to measure precisely.
  • www.oxfordreference.com/pages/samplep-17

www.oxfordreference.com/pages/samplep-17
http//www.stuorg.iastate.edu/ethosmagazine/april0
7/images/set04sm.jpg
36
Linear Perspective
  • Linear perspective combines geometry and art.
  • Linear perspective is used in theatre arts and in
    visual arts.


http//rourkevisualart.com/wordpress/wp-content/up
loads/2007/03/linear_perspective.jpg
37
Fractals
  • A fractal is generally a rough or fragmented
    geometric shape that can be split into parts.

http//math.rice.edu/lanius/frac/
http//www.ccs.neu.edu/home/fell/COM1201/PROGRAMS/
RecursiveFractals1.gif
38
Human Proportions
  • The distance from the top of the head to the chin
    is about 1/7 of his total height (from head to
    toe).
  • The width of the shoulders is ¼ the height of a
    person.
  • The length from top to bottom of the buttocks is
    1 head.
  • The length of the foot is equal to the length of
    the forearm.
  • The distance from the hip to the toes is 4 heads.

http//www.animatedbuzz.com/tutorials/images/propo
rtion04.jpg
39
Facial Proportions
  • The eyes are halfway between the top of the head
    and the chin.
  • The bottom of the nose is halfway between the
    eyes and the chin.
  • The mouth is 1/3 to ½ way between the nose and
    the chin.
  • The corners of the mouth line up with the centers
    of the eyes.
  • The top of the ears line up above the eyes, on
    the eyebrows.
  • The bottom of the ears line up with the bottom of
    the nose.
  • The top center of the teeth and the eyes form a
    triangle.
  • The distance from one side of the head to the
    other side is equal to 5 eyes.

40
Try it Yourself!
  • You do not have to be an artist to draw a
    portrait proportionally correct.
  • You can draw a face using basic elements of math.

41
STEP 1
  • Drawing LIGHTLY, draw an oval.
  • If you want to really live life on the edge, draw
    an egg shape with the larger part at the top.
  • (You can also draw an egg shape mathematically.)

42
STEP 2
  • Draw a vertical line splitting the oval in half.
  • Draw a horizontal line splitting the oval into
    upper and lower halves.

43
STEP 3
  • Draw another horizontal line ¼ of the way from
    the top.
  • Draw a third horizontal line ¼ of the way from
    the bottom.

44
STEP 4
  • Draw the final horizontal line 1/3 of the way
    from the last horizontal line to the bottom of
    the oval.
  • Draw 2 vertical lines ½ way between the center
    line and the outer edges of the oval.

45
  • SO FAR

46
STEP 5 EYES
  • Draw the eyebrows on the center horizontal line
    (centered above the blue lines).
  • Draw the upper eyelid just below the eyebrows.
  • Draw the pupils on the blue lines.

47
STEP 6 NOSE AND MOUTH
  • Draw the tip of the nose and the nostrils on the
    line that is ¼ from the bottom.
  • Draw the upper lip on the line 1/3 of the way
    from the tip of the nose to the chin.

48
STEP 7 EARS
  • Start the ears at the eyebrow line (½ way between
    the top of the head and the chin).
  • End the ear at the nose line (¾ of the way down
    from the top of the oval).
  • NOTE The shape is almost like half of a
    valentine.

49
STEP 8 HAIR
  • The hairline begins ¼ of the way down from the
    top.
  • and you can add other details to make the
    person unique (wrinkles, freckles, etc.)

50
Another Way
  • There are other ways to draw the face
    mathematically as well by drawing two circlesone
    for the head and one for the jaw. HOWEVER, the
    proportions remain the same.

51
Any Questions?
52
ARTS EDUCATION AND 21ST CENTURY SKILLS IN NORTH
CAROLINA
  • This document examines how the Arts Education
    Standard Course of Study aligns with and teaches
    21st century themes and skills and much more.
  • To order, please call (800) 663-1250 or visit
    Publication Sales on the Web at
    http//www.ncpublicschools.org/publications/.
  • IS173, 2009, 12
  • View the online version (free) at
    http//www.ncpublicschools.org/curriculum/artsed/r
    esources/

53
Arts Education Resources at the Department of
Public Instruction
  • Myron Carter, Theatre Arts Visual Arts
    Education Consultant
  • mcarter_at_dpi.state.nc.us
  • 919-807-3758
  • Christie Lynch Ebert, Dance Music Education
    Consultant
  • clynch_at_dpi.state.nc.us
  • 919-807-3856
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