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Presenting, Pondering, and Planning with Minnesota Student Survey Data

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Put these responses on the large white paper on your tables. Questions to Ponder ... Use the first four pages of your worksheet packet to select four key indicators ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Presenting, Pondering, and Planning with Minnesota Student Survey Data


1
Presenting, Pondering, and Planning with
Minnesota Student Survey Data
  • Spring 2005 Regional Workshops

2
Morning Meeting
  • At your tables, spend time answering the
    following questions (next slide).
  • Use the talking piece to guide who is speaking in
    turn.
  • Select three responses to each question you want
    to share with the larger group.
  • Identify someone to record these responses.
  • Put these responses on the large white paper on
    your tables.

3
Questions to Ponder
  • What do you need in order to be inspired today?
  • What do you hope to take home from todays
    workshop?
  • Whats the most critical question you have about
    the Minnesota Student Survey?

4
Overview of Today
  • Minnesota Student Survey Overview
  • 30 Key Indicators
  • Examining and Giving Meaning
  • Comparing Data
  • Presenting and Collaborating with Data
  • Using Data for Planning, Assessment
  • Sharing Resources
  • SDFS E-Application

5
Resource Materials
  • Teal packet
  • Agenda, presentation slides, worksheet materials,
    copies of MSS, MSS use examples, statewide data
    tables, trends report, evaluation, funding flyer,
    training flyer, information gathering
  • Additional materials
  • Attendance certificate, county tables, prevention
    region tables, MPRC materials

6
Minnesota Student Survey Basics
  • Population-based youth survey for grades 6, 9
    12
  • 2 versions of the survey
  • Paper-pencil bubble survey
  • Brief one class period
  • Uniform instructions, site administration
  • Administered every three years since 1989, spring
    administration

7
Content
  • Demographics
  • School academics, plans, relationships, safety
  • Family relationships, risk factors
  • Health/risk behaviors physical activity,
    nutrition, ATOD, sexual behavior, injury and
    violence
  • Stress, coping and mental health

8
Involvement
  • Traditional public schools
  • Including charter schools, tribal schools
  • Alternative schools/area learning centers
  • Juvenile correctional facilities/detention
    centers
  • Residential behavioral treatment facilities

9
Participation
  • Student participation rates
  • Statewide, the 2004 MSS data represent these
    percentages of regular public school students
  • 6th grade 76 48,131
  • 9th grade 72 49,210
  • 12th grade 55 34,521
  • Districts 88
  • Special populations
  • Alternative schools/area learning centers 3,508
  • Juvenile correctional facilities 798
  • Residential behavioral treatment facilities 228

10
Sharing Results
  • www.mnschoolhealth.com
  • Click on the BLUE Data button
  • Statewide tables, trend report, county reports
  • District reports e-mailed to each district
    directly
  • www.health.state.mn.us/alcohol
  • ATOD trends, 1992-2004
  • Planning materials
  • Regional meetings, special presentations
  • Future work
  • Content specific briefs, associations analysis
  • Release of dataset

11
30 Key Indicators
  • Student-centered framework

Student (Individual)
School
Family
Community
12
Setting the Stage
  • Who took the survey?
  • Which young people are the focus of our data
    sharing?
  • What are important characteristics to share?
  • Total number of youth participating
  • Gender
  • Age
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Which adults youth live with
  • Mental or physical health problems of youth

13
Demographics
  • Table 1, page 1 of data tables
  • Questions
  • 1 What is your sex?
  • 2 What is your grade in school right now?
  • 3 How old are you?
  • 4 How do you describe yourself? (Mark all that
    apply)

14
Total Numbers
15
Gender
16
Age
17
Race/Ethnicity
18
Living Situation
  • Question 5 Which adults do you live with? (Mark
    all that apply)
  • Table 9, page 11 of data tables

19
Living Situation
20
Mental/Physical Health
  • Question 28 Do you have a mental or physical
    condition or other health problem that has lasted
    at least 12 months?
  • Table 15, page 17 of data tables

21
Mental/Physical Health Problem
22
Reflecting on Your Data
  • As we review key indicators,
  • Use the first four pages of your worksheet packet
    to select four key indicators you want to explore
    further using your own data
  • Student, school, family, community
  • In a manner similar to the presentation, graph
    your own key indicator data
  • Select an indicator, identify the appropriate
    legend/key
  • Graph the values (remember to add up across
    categories!) for your data

23
Individual (Student)Indicators
Student (Individual)
24
Group Brainstorming
  • What are the key pieces of information you would
    like to know and share about students?
  • Behaviors? Attitudes?
  • In what areas?

25
Indicator 1 Feelings About School(Like school
very much or quite a bit)
  • Question 8 How do you feel about going to
    school?
  • Table 2, page 2

26
Indicator 1 Feelings About School(Like school
very much or quite a bit)
27
Indicator 2 Skipping School(Skipped 1 times
in past 30 days)
  • Question 10 During the last 30 days, how often
    have you skipped or cut full days of school?
  • Table 2, page 2

28
Indicator 2 Skipping School(Skipped 1 times
in last 30 days)
29
Indicator 3 1 Hours in Activities
  • Question 22 During the school year, how many
    hours in a typical week do you spend doing the
    following?
  • Band, choir, orchestra, music lessons, or
    practicing voice or an instrument
  • Clubs or organizations outside of school
  • Playing sports on a school team
  • Table 7a, page 7

30
Indicator 3 1 Hours in Activities
31
Indicator 4 1 Hours in Work
  • Question 22 During the school year, how many
    hours in a typical week do you spend doing the
    following?
  • Volunteer work or community service
  • Chores at home/babysitting for family
  • Work for pay (including babysitting for others)
  • Table 7c, page 9

32
Indicator 4 1 Hours in Work
33
Indicator 5 Use of Internet at Home
  • Question 24 Do you use the Internet at home? If
    yes, what do you use the Internet for at home?
    (Mark all that apply)
  • E-mail
  • Chat rooms
  • Homework or other research
  • Table 8, page 10

34
Indicator 5 Use of Internet at Home
35
Indicator 6 Physical Activity(5 of last 7
days, 30 minutes)
  • Question 31 On how many of the last 7 days were
    you physically active for a combined total of at
    least 30 minutes?
  • Table 17, page 19

36
Indicator 6 Physical Activity(5 of last 7
days, 30 minutes)
37
Indicator 7 Use of Seat Belts Always Wear When
Riding
  • Question 25 How often do you wear a seat belt
    when you.ride in a car?
  • Table 19, page 21

38
Indicator 7 Use of Seat BeltsAlways Wear When
Riding
39
Indicator 8 Suicidal Thoughts in Past Year
  • Question 53 Have you ever thought about killing
    yourself?
  • Table 23, page 25

40
Indicator 8 Suicidal Thoughts in Past Year
41
Indicator 9 Physical Fights at Least Once in
Past Year
  • Question 68 During the last 12 months, how
    often have you hit or beat up another person?
  • Table 26, page 28

42
Indicator 9 Physical Fights at Least Once in
Past Year
43
Indicator 10 Smoked Cigarette on at Least One
Day in Past Month
  • Question 74 During the last 30 days, on how
    many days did you smoke a cigarette?
  • Table 28, page 30

44
Indicator 10 Smoked Cigarette on at Least One
Day in Past Month
45
Indicator 11 Drank Alcohol at Least Once in
Past Month
  • Question 79 On how many occasions (if any) have
    you had alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, wine
    coolers, or liquor) to drink during the last 30
    days?
  • Table 31, page 33

46
Indicator 11 Drank Alcohol at Least Once in
Past Month
47
Indicator 12 Used Marijuana at Least Once in
Past Month
  • Question 85 On how many occasions (if any) have
    you used marijuana (grass, pot) or hashish (hash,
    hash oil) during the last 30 days?
  • Table 34, page 36

48
Indicator 12 Used Marijuana at Least Once in
Past Month
49
Indicator 13 Sources of Information for
Alcohol/Other Drugs
  • Question 37 Where have you received most of
    your information about alcohol and other drugs?
    (Mark all that apply)
  • Table 20, page 22

50
Indicator 13 Sources of Information for
Alcohol/Other Drugs
51
Indicator 14 Ever Had Sex
  • Question 111 Have you ever had sexual
    intercourse (gone all the way)?
  • Table 42a, page 45

52
Indicator 14 Ever Had Sex
53
Indicator 15 Talked about Preventing Pregnancy
(At Least Once with Each Partner)
  • Question 113 Have you talked with your
    partner(s) about preventing pregnancy?
  • Table 42b, page 46

54
Indicator 15 Talked about Preventing Pregnancy
(At Least Once with Each Partner)
55
School Indicators
School
56
Group Brainstorming
  • What are the key pieces of information you would
    like to know and share about schools?
  • School environment? School staff?
  • About what issues?

57
Indicator 16 All/Most Students in School
Friendly
  • Question 13 How many students in your school
    are friendly?
  • Table 4, page 4

58
Indicator 16 All/Most Students in School
Friendly
59
Indicator 17 All/Most Teachers Interested
  • Question 14 How many of your teachers are
    interested in you as a person?
  • Table 4, page 4

60
Indicator 17 All/Most Teachers Interested
61
Indicator 18 All/Most Teachers Show Respect
  • Question 14 How many of your teachers show
    respect for the students?
  • Table 4, page 4

62
Indicator 18 All/Most Teachers Show Respect
63
Indicator 19 Feel Safe at School (Strongly
Agree/Agree)
  • Question 15 How much do you agree or disagree
    with the following statements? I feel safe at
    school.
  • Table 5, page 5

64
Indicator 19 Feel Safe at School (Strongly
Agree/Agree)
65
Indicator 20 Insulted, Threatened, Assaulted at
School(At Least Once in Past Year)
  • Question 16 During the last 12 months, which of
    the following has happened to you on school
    property? Has a student insulted you? Threatened
    you? Pushed, shoved or grabbed you?
  • Table 6, page 6

66
Indicator 20 Insulted, Threatened, Assaulted at
School(At Least Once in Past Year)
67
Family Indicators
Family
68
Group Brainstorming
  • What are the key pieces of information you would
    like to know and share about families?
  • Behaviors? Attitudes? Connections with youth?
  • In what areas?

69
Indicator 21 Talk with Father(Most/Some of
Time)
  • Question 6 Can you talk to your father about
    problems you are having?
  • Table 9, page 11

70
Indicator 21 Talk with Father(Most/Some of
Time)
71
Indicator 22 Talk with Mother(Most/Some of
Time)
  • Question 7 Can you talk to your mother about
    problems you are having?
  • Table 9, page 11

72
Indicator 22 Talk with Mother(Most/Some of
Time)
73
Indicator 23 Parents Caring(Very Much/Quite a
Bit)
  • Question 39 How much do you feel your parents
    care about you?
  • Table 10, page 12

74
Indicator 23 Parents Caring(Very Much/Quite a
Bit)
75
Indicator 24 Family Alcohol Use Problems
  • Question 57 Has alcohol use by any family
    member repeatedly caused family, health, job or
    legal problems?
  • Table 12, page 14

76
Indicator 24 Family Alcohol Use Problems
77
Indicator 25 Family Drug Use Problems
  • Question 58 Has drug use by any family member
    repeatedly caused family, health, job or legal
    problems?
  • Table 12, page 14

78
Indicator 25 Family Drug Use Problems
79
Community Indicators
Community
80
Group Brainstorming
  • What are the key pieces of information you would
    like to know and share about communities?
  • Community environment? Connection to community?
    Caring by members?
  • About what issues?

81
Indicator 26 Feel Safe Going To and From
School (Strongly Agree/Agree)
  • Question 15 How much do you agree or disagree
    with the following statements? I feel safe going
    to and from school.
  • Table 5, page 5

82
Indicator 26 Feel Safe Going To and From
School (Strongly Agree/Agree)
83
Indicator 27 Friends Caring(Very Much/Quite a
Bit)
  • Question 39 How much do you feel your friends
    care about you?
  • Table 11, page 13

84
Indicator 27 Friends Caring(Very Much/Quite a
Bit)
85
Indicator 28 Church/Spiritual Leaders
Caring(Very Much/Quite a Bit)
  • Question 39 How much do you feel church or
    spiritual leaders care about you?
  • Table 11, page 13

86
Indicator 28 Church/Spiritual Leaders
Caring(Very Much/Quite a Bit)
87
Indicator 29 Police Officers Caring(Very
Much/Quite a Bit)
  • Question 39 How much do you feel police
    officers care about you?
  • Table 11, page 13

88
Indicator 29 Police Officers Caring(Very
Much/Quite a Bit)
89
Indicator 30 Other Adults Caring(Very
Much/Quite a Bit)
  • Question 39 How much do you feel other adults
    in your community care about you?
  • Table 11, page 13

90
Indicator 30 Other Adults Caring(Very
Much/Quite a Bit)
91
Time for Your Indicators
  • Select one of the key student, school, family and
    community indicators that you find especially
    relevant for your community
  • Graph the values from your data (district data,
    county data, regional data) on the worksheets

92
30 Key Indicators
Student (Individual)
School
Family
Community
93
Break Time!
94
How to Examine the Data
  • Whats the best way to think about all of these
    data?
  • Using various frameworks, based upon the audience
    and consumers of the data
  • You may need to consider using multiple
    frameworks, one for each of your audiences, or
    one for each of your consumers

95
Theoretical Frameworks
  • Student-centered perspective
  • Similar to our 30 key indicators, focusing on
    student, and the student interaction with the
    school environment, the home/family environment,
    and the larger community
  • Mirrors the concepts of individual student
    factors and interacting support factors (learning
    environment, family/parent support, community
    support)

96
Theoretical Frameworks
  • Assets and risks
  • Examining each indicator or question from the
    perspective of whether its a protective factor
    or a risk factor
  • Withholding value judgments on indicatorsand
    examining them from both perspectives
  • 37 of 12th grade boys binge drink!
  • 63 of 12th grade boys dont binge drink!

97
Stages of Development
  • Boys and Girls
  • Examining indicators by gender is critical,
    especially for certain behaviors
  • Sex, ATOD initiation, mental health issues,
    physical aggression

98
Stages of Development
  • Grades
  • Examining indicators by grade is also important,
    especially as it gives an opportunity to notice
    changes over time, dips and peaks
  • Theres a clear dip in the ability of 9th grade
    females to talk with either parent, compared to
    their 6th and 12th grade peers

99
Content Areas
  • Traditional perspective, often based on our own
    professional silos
  • MSS Trends report uses this approach
  • Our categories
  • Academics school connectedness
  • School safety
  • Violent and anti-social behavior
  • Mental health, gambling
  • ATOD
  • Other health behaviors
  • Sexual behavior
  • Families

100
Giving the Data Context
  • What do these data reflect about your school,
    your district, your community, your county?
  • Do they reflect significant changes in
    programming over the past school year? Several
    years? New community coalitions addressing
    adolescent prevention issues? A significant
    historical event?

101
Consideration of Participation
  • What sort of participation do these data reflect?
  • Total students responding by grade/total
    enrollment by grade gives a by-grade
    participation figure

102
Think, Pair, Share
  • What was going on in your school, school
    district, community or county at the time of the
    survey?
  • The year or two before the survey?
  • The month or two before the survey?
  • How has your school, district, community or
    county experienced changes since the survey was
    administered? In what way(s)?

103
Giving the Data Meaning
  • What does the number mean?
  • Is it more than or less than half of the
    students?
  • How many of 10 students does it represent? 5
    students? 60 is 3 out of every 5 students

104
More Meaning
  • How do we apply the percentage to the population?
  • Although a prevalence may be low (3, 5),
    applying it to the full student body (1,000), may
    mean youd expect 30 or 50 students with this
    experience.
  • How can we tell stories with the numbers?
  • Draw upon your experiences to share real-life
    stories of young people

105
Data, Data Everywhere!
  • If you have district data, you have at least 3
    comparison options
  • County, prevention region, statewide
  • Which comparison is most appropriate, given your
    community and interests?
  • Would it be appropriate to compare your data to
    other school districts?

106
What to Do with All These Data?
  • If you have county data, you have at least 2
    comparison options
  • Prevention region, statewide
  • Again, which comparison is most appropriate,
    given your community and interests?
  • Would it be appropriate to compare your data to
    other counties, not a set of counties?

107
Continued Reflection on Data
  • Use the next four pages of your worksheet packet
    to compare your four local key indicators to
    another set of data
  • Graph your own key indicator data next to the
    other data selected
  • Local school district and county
  • County and prevention region

108
Limitations on Data
  • Consider LIMITING the amount of data you present
  • Male and female separately
  • Separate grades presented
  • Only a portion of the data

109
Comparisons for Indicator 7 Male Seat Belt Use
When Riding
110
Comparisons for Indicator 7 Female Seat Belt
Use When Riding
111
Innovative Ways to Present
  • WHY present the data?
  • Denial breaker and myth buster
  • Planning and prioritization
  • Persuading communities, grantmakers,
    policymakers, media
  • Using the data to spark collaboration and
    communication

112
Innovative Presentation
  • HOW to present the data?
  • Traditional presentations to the school board,
    school teachers, administrators
  • Teaching with the data (part of prevention
    curricula)
  • Other examples

113
Presentation Considerations
  • Who is the audience? Law enforcement? School
    administrators? PTA members? Liquor store owners?
    Clinic health care staff?
  • Whats important to the audience? Which issues?
    Which age groups? Which perspectives?
  • How can you involve young people?
  • How can we take care in our judgments?

114
When Presenting, Remember
  • Your audience can only take in 5 new pieces of
    information before they need a break and time to
    process.
  • Use simple blocks to build complexity.
  • Allow for reflection, processing, or action after
    each building block.
  • Weve tried to expose you to opportunities for
    reflection, processing and action today.
  • Cooperative learning, reflection and sharing,
    active presentations..

115
Practice in Presenting
  • In your small groups (based on your morning
    meeting), select ONE indicator comparison you
    would like to share with the greater group.
  • Prepare a short (3 minute) presentation about
    that indicator for..
  • Your regional safe drug free schools
    coordinators
  • Members of your schools parent advisory board
  • Your county commissioners
  • A 10th grade health education class at the HS
  • Nurses and doctors from the local hospital
  • Community liaison officers from the local
    police/sheriffs office

116
Discussing Collaboration
  • How have you used student survey data to spark
    collaboration in your community?
  • What can you imagine about how you might use
    student survey data for collaboration? What
    unique groups might you ask to the table that you
    have not previously considered?

117
Lunch Time!
118
Using the Data.
  • Apart from using the data to spark collaboration,
    entice interest in prevention, and challenge
    perceptions, the data can be used specifically
  • For needs assessment
  • For prevention planning
  • For program evaluation

119
Needs Assessment
  • Minnesota Student Survey data can serve as a set
    of social indicator data as you conduct a needs
    assessment

120
Benchmarks
  • Consider the benchmarks against which you want to
    compare the data
  • Healthy People 2010, Healthy Minnesotans
  • CHS plans and other planning documents
  • Community conversations about what is
    acceptable and desirable
  • Other national surveys
  • Monitoring the Future www.monitoringthefuture.org
  • Youth Risk Behavior Survey www.cdc.gov/healthyyou
    th

121
Program Planning
  • OSDFS Principles of Effectiveness
  • www.ed.gov
  • Minnesotas Four Principles of Prevention
  • www.health.state.mn.us
  • www.health.state.mn.us/alcohol (Alcohol Plan)
  • School Improvement Planning Tool Stages
  • www.k12.wa.us
  • Western CAPT Program Planning
  • http//casat.unr.edu/westcapt/
  • CDC Framework for Program Evaluation in Public
    Health
  • http//www.cdc.gov/eval/framework.htm
  • CDC Planned Approach to Community Health PATCH
  • http//www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/patch/index.htm
  • NACCHOs Mobilizing for Action through Planning
    and Partnerships
  • http//mapp.naccho.org/MAPP_Home.asp

122
Program Planning
  • Where these models and tools call for assessment
    of need and evaluation to assess strategies,
    student survey data can fit the bill

123
Use Minnesota Student Survey data here
124
Program Evaluation
Process
Impact
Outcome
125
Program Evaluation Yes
  • Minnesota Student Survey data can be considered
    outcome data, especially if your program or
    intervention was comprehensive and broad-based
  • All or almost all students were included as part
    of the program

126
Program Evaluation No
  • These data cannot be considered process data or
    impact data for program evaluation
  • You should be complementing student survey data
    with other data (e.g., administrative records,
    participant information, pre-post surveys) to
    tell the full story about your program or
    intervention

127
Small Group Brainstorming
  • What other local, regional or statewide data are
    you using to complement student survey data?
  • How are you using these data to inform needs
    assessment, program planning and/or program
    evaluation?

128
Time for a Transition. and Some Resources
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