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Introduction to Biological Mathematics: Meeting 1

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Title: Introduction to Biological Mathematics: Meeting 1


1
Introduction to Biological Mathematics Meeting 1
  • March 31, 2004

2
Introduction
  • Alex ShulmanE-mail shulmana_at_post.tau.ac.il
  • Website
  • http//www.cs.tau.ac.il/shulmana/

3
Overview
  • What is BioMath?
  • Main Fields of Research
  • Biological Goals and Motivation
  • Computational Aspects
  • Biological Background
  • Molecular and Cellular Biology

4
Mathematical biology
  • Mathematical biology or biomathematics is an
    interdisciplinary field of academic study which
    aims at modelling natural, biological processes
    using mathematical techniques and tools. It has
    both practical and theoretical applications in
    biological research.

http//www.answers.com/topic/mathematical-biology
5
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6
Main Fields of Research
  • Molecular and Cellular Biology
  • Genomics and Proteomics
  • Simulations and Drug Design
  • Bio-Inspired Materials.
  • Neurosciences.
  • Biotechnology, Medical Imaging, Signal
    Processing and Equipment.
  • Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Epidemiology.

7
Genomics
  • The Human Genome Project (HGP) was the
    international research program whose goal was the
    complete mapping and understanding of all the
    genes of human beings. All our genes together are
    known as our "genome.
  • The HGP has revealed that there are probably
    somewhere between 30,000 and 40,000 human genes.

8
The Genome
  • Human genes occupy a tiny fraction of the genome.
    Less then 2 percent codes for proteins.
  • They are divided into coding regions (exons) and
    noncoding regions (introns).
  • Apparently humans do more with their genes than
    do other animals. It is thought that most human
    genes can produce about three different proteins
    as compared to about one protein per gene for
    most other species.
  • One way this occurs is through alternative
    splicing in which a single RNA transcript (called
    a premRNA) gives rise to more than one mRNA.

9
Computational Aspects
  • Significant work is required to develop data
    management systems to make these data not just
    retrievable, but usable as input to computations
    and amenable to complex, ad hoc queries across
    multiple data types.
  • Significant work is also required on techniques
    for integrating data obtained for multiple
    observables, at different scales, with different
    uncertainties (data fusion) and for formulating
    meaningful queries against such heterogeneous
    data (data mining).

10
Proteomics
  • The proteome is the complete set of biologically
    active proteins in a cell.
  • Individual proteins are characterized by specific
    structural domains.
  • A given protein domain can play different roles
    in different proteins.
  • In humans old protein domains can be
    rearrangedin new ways to produce larger
    proteomes.

11
Structural Genomics
  • Structural genomics is a worldwide initiative
    aimed at determining a large number of protein
    structures in a high throughput mode.
  • Functional annotation of the newly determined
    proteins is another interesting field of
    research.

12
Simulations
  • The Goal
  • To reproduce and predict structure, dynamics and
    thermodynamics.
  • Computational representations that range from
    simple lattice models to full quantum mechanical
    wave functions of nuclei and electrons.
  • Computational Aspects
  • Developments of both hardware and software for
    parallel computing.
  • Developing simplified but realistic computational
    models that will reduce the running time.

13
Drug Design
An infection (bacterium, virus)? A mutant protein?
Classifications, comparisons and statistical
analysis.
Understanding the biological nature of the
disease.
Given a candidate can you test it?
Lab equipment
Developing an essay (wet lab).
Predict and analyze its structure.
Identify the target, usually a protein.
Known substrate?
Alignment, docking and DB searches. Statistical
analysis.
What molecules bind to the target?
Lead Identification and optimization.
Statistical evaluation.Structural analysis.
Preclinical testing (in vitro and animals)
Clinical Trials (Phases I-IV)
14
Drug Design
The binding sites of receptor protein tyrosine
kinase c-Kit (1pkg, purple) and c-ABL
tyrosine kinase (1iep, green) aligned by the
SiteEngine method.
15
Immunology and Virology
  • Mathematical modeling has had a major impact on
    research in immunology and virology.
  • Mathematical modeling combined with analysis of
    data obtained during drug clinical trials
    established for the first time that HIV is
    rapidly cleared from the body and that
    approximately 10 billion virus particles are
    produced daily.
  • Challenges remain in studying such issues as how
    rapidly viruses mutate and become drug resistant
    under different therapeutic regimes needs to be
    considered, which is also relevant to the
    development of antibiotic resistance.

16
Targeted Medicine
A better understanding of the genetic root cause
of disease is the key to improved diagnosis and
treatment of many complex chronic diseases.
17
Bio-Inspired Materials
Developing new high-performance engineering
materials based on ideas inferred from Nature.
Proteins derived from spider silk serve as the
inspiration for high-strength fibers.
18
Nanotubes
19
Neurosciences
Understanding how behavior emerges from
properties of neurons and networks of neurons.
Mathematical analysis is needed to interpret the
results of massive computations, and to
incorporate the insights into network models.
20
Medical Signal Processing
21
Medical Imaging and Image Processing
22
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Epidemiology
To what extent is the organization of the
biological world are predictable and unique?
What are the rules governing its evolution?
23
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24
The Cell
25
BackgroundThe Central Dogma
RNA is an information carrier from DNA to Protein
26
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27
From Genes to Proteins
28
DNA
29
Building Blocks of DNA
30
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31
The Watson-Crick model
32
Gene - encodes for protein
body cells
nucleus
DNA - The fundamental chemical unit of life ACTG
33
Splicing
  • DNA encoding a gene's precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA)
    is organised into regions called exons (EXpressed
    sequences) which may be spread across thousands
    of nucleotide base pairs (bp).
  • The areas between exons ina gene are called
    introns (INtervening sequences).

34
Splicing and Spliceosome
  • Most introns start (5') with the sequence GU and
    end (3') with an AG which are referred to as the
    splice donor and splice acceptor sites.
  • Another important sequence is the branch site
    located 20-50 base pairs upstream (5') of the
    splice acceptor site and containing a conserved
    A.
  • Five small nuclear RNA molecules (snRNA) and
    their proteins form a complex called the
    spliceosome. Through an enzymatic process the
    intron is then removed and the exons joined
    together.

35
Alternative Splicing
  • Another form of intron removal involving a
    spliceosome is called alternative splicing and is
    shown below.
  • This process can produce more than one protein
    due to different ways of splicing the same mRNA.

36
RNA
37
The RNA World Model
  • Messenger RNA (mRNA) carries the information
    recorded in DNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm
    of the cell.
  • Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) form complexes with protein
    to form ribosomes, the site of protein synthesis
    wihtin the cytoplasm of the cell.
  • Small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is involved in pre-mRNA
    splicing.
  • Heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) is the primary
    transcript from the eukaryotic enzyme, RNA
    polymerase II. hnRNA is the precursor of all mRNA
    often called "pre-mRNA", prior to the removal of
    introns.
  • Transfer RNA (tRNA) carries amino acids to
    nascent polypeptide chains synthesised on the
    ribosomes.
  • Small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) is found in the
    cell's nucleolus where it processes and
    methylates rRNA.

38
Different Types of RNA
  • Involved in translation mRNA, rRNA, tRNA
  • Other non-coding RNAs

39
Nucleotide Bases
  • Also called Nitrogen bases
  • Aromatic bases
  • Planar molecules

Pyrimidines
Purines
40
RNA Structure
Secondary Structure
Primary Structure
Tertiary Structure
A
A
C
C
41
Secondary Structure
Primary Structure
Secondary Structure
Base Pairing- Mainly Watson-Crick A-U (2
H-bonds) G-C (3 H-bonds)
A
A
C
C
42
Secondary Structure Elements
43
Tertiary Structure
tRNA-Phe from yeast
44
  • Binding divalent metals in coaxial stacking

The role of Mg in the P4-P6 structure
45
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46
Protein Degradation
  • The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2004, Avram Hershko,
    Aaron Ciechanover and Irvin Rose - for the
    discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein
    degradation (animation).

47
Computational Aspects
  • Sequence
  • Alignment between DNA sequences
  • Recognition of genes and classification
  • Prediction of binding and function
  • Sequence assembly
  • Prediction of the location of genes, exons,
    introns and splicing sites.
  • Gene Expression Data Analysis
  • Structure
  • Prediction of structure
  • Similarity of structures and prediction of
    function
  • Prediction of binding and drug design

48
Thank You!
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