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Computer Technology

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How to Tell if You Are Looking at a Great WebSite ... Use caution - but PBS.kids.org is still better than an XBox. http://www.sesameworkshop.org ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Computer Technology


1
Computer Technology Early Literacy Web
Enhanced Early Literacy Instruction
  • Region VII Head Start Conference
  • Jeri Levesque, Ed.D. JALsails_at_aol.com
  • LIFT-Missouri http//www.lift-missouri.org

2
How Do You Use Computers?
  • Communication
  • Entertainment
  • Transportation
  • Utility
  • Safety
  • Information
  • Work

3
What are the connections between early literacy
and educational technologies?
  • When do computers help?
  • When do they hinder?

4
How to Tell if You Are Looking at a Great
WebSite http//www.ala.org/parentspage/greatsites/
criteria.html
  • Sites from commercial businesses usually include
    .com federal government sites end in .gov,
    K-12 school sites often include k12 in the
    address, and college and university sites often
    include .edu.
  • Sites from non-profit organizations often include
    .org.
  • A site with a tilde () in the address usually
    indicates that this page is maintained or created
    by an individual, rather than representing an
    organization, a business, or a school.
  • Established by the first ALSC Children and
    Technology Committee, 1997

5
4 Keys to Good Reading
  • Understanding how ABCs work as words
  • Listening to the sounds of language
  • Choosing using prior knowledge to make meaning
    from print
  • Reading fluently.

6
Teach Brains to Read
7
Brain Development and Reading
  • Children develop much of their capacity for
    learning in the first three years of life, when
    their brains grow to 90 percent of their
    eventual adult weight (Karoly et al., 1998).

8
Brains Read
  • A childs intelligence, so long as it falls
    within a normal range, does not determine the
    ease with which the child will learn to read.
  • Rather, as children grow and experience the
    world, new neural connections are made. This
    orderly and individualized process, varying from
    child to child, makes reading possible.
    http//faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html

9
http//www.brainconnection.com
  • Given the course of brain development, it is not
    surprising that young children who are exposed to
    certain experiences usually prove to be good
    readers later.

10
Parents Grow Readers
  • As parents talk, sing, and read to children, the
    childrens brain cells are literally turned on
    (Shore, 1997).
  • The opportunity for creating the foundation for
    reading begins in the earliest years.
    http//dana.org

11
  • Moreover, many pediatricians now believe that a
    child who has never held a book or listened to a
    story is not a fully healthy child (Klass, 1998).

12
Developmental Milestones of Early Literacy
  • http//www.reachoutandread.org/downloads/RORmilest
    ones_English.pdf

13
  • Just as children develop language skills long
    before being able to speak, http//www.asha.org/pu
    blic/speech/development/lang_lit.htm
  • children also develops literacy skills long
    before being able to read (National Research
    Council, 1998).

14
  Born to Read How to Raise a
Reader http//www.ala.org/alsc/raise_a_reader.html
  • American Library Association
  • Here is a list of some of the best with
    easy-to-do tips developed by members of the
    Association for Library Service to Children, a
    division of the American Library Association.
    This information is also available in Spanish.

15
(No Transcript)
16
Family Resources on the Web
http//www.getreadytoread.org/images/stories/downl
oads/home_checlist_rev.pdf
http//www.famlit.org/faqs/faqreading.html
17
  • http//sesameworkshop.org/parents/
  • http//www.nickjr.com/home/index.jhtml
  • http//www.thewiggles.com.au/ca/home/


18
National Reading Panel Reports
  • Combination of
  • Teaching Phonics, Word Sounds,plus
  • Giving Feedback on Oral Reading
  • is the Most Effective Way to Teach Reading

19
Reading Starts with Phonemes
  • Phonemic Awareness is the ability to notice,
    think about and manipulate the individual sounds
    in words and phonemes.
  • Phonemes are the smallest units of sound in the
    language.
  • Just 44 phonemes (speech sounds) make up all of
    the words in the English language.

20
Phonological Awareness
  • PA is an auditory skill. A child can have
    adequate hearing but not be able to recognize
    phonemes in context.
  • Phonemes are harder to recognize in noisy
    classrooms, when they blend with other words, and
    when they occur in rapid speech.

21
Why is Phonological Awareness So Important for
Reading?
  • It help readers to understand that the alphabet
    relates to individual words sounds.
  • It helps them notice the most common rules for
    letters representing sounds.
  • It helps them make educated guesses when reading
    new words, by sounding them out.

22
  • The words we speak are made up of individual
    pieces of sound that are strung together so
    rapidly it's often impossible to separate them.

23
Why Children Succeed or Fail in Reading
  • Learning to read involves gaining the
    understanding that the letters on a page stand
    for the individual pieces of sound in speech.
  • Some children will develop reading difficulties
    unless they are explicitly taught this
    relationship.
  • http//www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/readbro
    .htm

24
Alphabetic Principles
http//www.starfall.com/
25
Seussville University http//www.seussville.com/un
iversity
26
http//www.readwritethink.org/
27
Literacy Engagements
  • Learning Language
  • Using language and other sign systems as ways of
    making meaning
  • Interactive reading
  • Fluency
  • Process writing
  • Word recognition
  • Writing to learn

28
Learning About Language
  • Understanding how language works,
  • word play,
  • letter-sound relationships and spelling or
    grammar patterns,
  • Comprehension
  • Genre study
  • Language conventions
  • Vocabulary
  • Word study

29
Pre-K Literacy Activities
  • http//www.hubbardscupboard.org/pre-kindergarten.h
    tml
  • http//pbskids.org/lions/readingvideo/index.html

30
Read Every Day Something New and Something True
  • 100 Best Books for Children
  • http//www.teachersfirst.com/100books.htm
  • Parent Soup
  • http//www.parentsoup.com

31
http//www.bookadventure.com/
  • Book Adventure is a FREE reading motivation
    program for children in grades K-8.
  • However, the parent who accesses this site is
    blitzed with opportunities to sign on

32
TV Technology Literacy
  • Some web pages are very slow to load they contain
    images and sounds.
  • Children are used to rapid images and high tech
    sounds.
  • Use caution - but PBS.kids.org is still better
    than an XBox.
  • http//www.sesameworkshop.org

33
http//PBSKIDS.org
  • Arthur
  • Barney
  • Between the Lions
  • Clifford
  • Dragon Tales
  • George Shrinks
  • Mr. Rogers
  • Reading Rainbow…

34
Childrens Television Workshop
  • http//www.sesameworkshop.org/

35
Between the Lions http//pbskids.org/lions
36
Teacher Resources
37
Academic Redshirting and Young Children http//www
.kidsource.com/education/red.shirting.html
  • The term redshirting originally referred to
    postponing a college athlete's participation in
    regular season games for one year to give him an
    extra year of further growth and practice with
    the team in the hope of improving the player's
    skills for future seasons.
  • Academic redshirting for young children refers to
    the practice of postponing entrance into
    kindergarten of age-eligible children in order to
    allow extra time for socioemotional,
    intellectual, or physical growth.
  • This kind of redshirting is most often practiced
    in the case of children whose birthdays are so
    close to the cut-off dates that they are very
    likely to be among the youngest in their
    kindergarten class.

38
Reading Rockets http//readingrockets.org
  • Excellent Q A forum.
  • First Year Teacher Tips

39
Celebrating Cultural Diversity Through
Childrens Literature
  • http//www.multiculturalchildrenslit.com/
  • This web site contains links to annotated
    bibliographies of children's multicultural books
    appropriate for the elementary grades
    (kindergarten through grade six). Cultural groups
    currently listed include African Americans,
    Chinese Americans, Latino/Hispanic Americans,
    Japanese Americans, Jewish Americans,  Native
    Americans, and Korean Americans.

40
Head Start Reading Resources
  • Let Us Help you teach young children to read.
  • http//www.highscope.org/

41
Transition to Kindergarten Resources for
Educators
  • http//www.getreadytoread.org
  • For parents
  • http//www.getreadytoread.org/images/stories/downl
    oads/transition/parent_resources/4_language_englis
    h.pdf

42
  • http//jc-schools.net/tutorials/interactive.htm

43
http//lift-missouri.org
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