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LIR 10: Week 2

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Use handout or MLA Handbook for exceptions. Author Examples. Nope: Filkins, Jean, M.S.L.I.S. ... Use the general MLA format for non-electronic sources: ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: LIR 10: Week 2


1
LIR 10 Week 2
  • Thesis Questions,
  • Citing, Evaluating and Annotating Sources

2
Class Announcements
  • Reader check next week!
  • No class 2/19
  • Classroom food/drink rules

3
This Weeks Class
  • From Topics to Thesis Statements/Research
    Questions
  • Citing Sources
  • Evaluating information
  • Creating annotations for the final project

4
From Topic to Thesis Statement
5
Research Topics
  • Topic selection
  • Specific topic ease of research
  • Focused
  • Eliminate off-topic sources
  • Even topics selected by instructors can be
    tweaked for easier research

6
Good Research Topics
  • Two (or more) elements
  • Thesis Topic Specific Assertion

7
Good Research Topics
  • Thesis Topic Specific Assertion
  • Reading students effect of reading dog
    program
  • Clash influence on music
  • Google privacy China policy
  • Steroids Congressional hearings

8
Is a thesis statement or research question
required?
  • Ask your instructor!
  • (Can be helpful even if not required.)

9
Creating Thesis and Topic Statements or Research
Questions
  • Thesis statement
  • One or two sentence statement articulating
    purpose
  • Defines, topic and may indicate point of view
  • Research Question
  • All of the above, plus
  • Articulates research topic in question form

10
Strong thesis/topic questions
  • Justifies discussion
  • One idea, direction for research
  • Specific
  • Roadmap for research and writing

11
Strong thesis statements?
  • Needs Improvement
  • Hansel and Gretel by the Brothers Grimm is one
    of the greatest classic fairy tales.
  • New and Improved!
  • The Brothers Grimm sought to improve health
    education for their public through fairy tales.
    Hansel and Gretel reflects their growing
    concern over the high-carbohydrate diets common
    in late 19th century Germany.

12
Strong research questions?
  • Needs Improvement
  • Does Hansel and Gretel reflect the health
    concerns of the Brothers Grimm?
  • New and Improved!
  • Given the Brothers Grimm commitment to health
    education through fairy tales, how does Hansel
    and Gretel demonstrate their concern with the
    high carbohydrate diet of Germans in the late
    19th century?

13
If your Thesis Question Can be answered by a
simple yes or no
  • Keep working!

14
An effective thesis statement or research
question
  • creates keywords for searching

15
Material in Reader(Excellent site for more
information)
  • http//owl.english.purdue.edu/workshops/hypertext/
    ResearchW/thesis.html

16
Thesis Statement/Research Question Homework for
Next Week
17
Citations Path to Sources
18
Citation styles what the heck?
  • MLA vs. APA
  • APA
  • http//www.santarosa.edu/library/guides/apa.pdf
  • http//www.santarosa.edu/library/guides/apa-databa
    ses.pdf

19
Avoiding plagiarism by citing
  • correctly

20
Avoid Plagiarism!
  • Using someone else's ideas without giving credit
  • Representing someone elses ideas as your own
  • either on purpose or through carelessness

21
What Content Should Be Credited?
  • Information, ideas
  • Paragraphs or sentences
  • Distinct phrases
  • Statistics, research, artwork, etc.

22
Who Should Be Credited?
  • Published writers of books, articles
  • Internet sources
  • Another student at SRJC or elsewhere

23
Keeping track of sources notecards
  • Author(s)
  • Title of article (periodicals)
  • Title of book, periodical or website
  • Date of publication
  • Place of publication (books)
  • URL (websites)

24
MLA Format Handouts online versions
  • General sources
  • http//www.santarosa.edu/library/guides/mla.pdf
  • Electronic sources
  • http//www.santarosa.edu/library/guides/mla-databa
    ses.pdf

25
Citation Elements Basic Bibliographic
Information (refer to this chart while we
continue)
26
Authors Name
  • Person/persons responsible for source
  • Last name first (except for additional authors)
  • Dont include credentials (not on notes)
  • Electronic sources may not be available
  • Use handout or MLA Handbook for exceptions

27
Author Examples
  • Nope
  • Filkins, Jean, M.S.L.I.S.
  • Filkins, Jean and Kitty, Hello.
  • Yep
  • Filkins, Jean.
  • Filkins, Jean and Hello Kitty.

28
Article Title (in quotes)
  • Name of
  • Encyclopedia article
  • Essay
  • Book chapter, section
  • Newspaper, magazine article
  • Web page, part of a web site
  • If using the whole book or website or
    alphabetical entry, article title is unnecessary

29
Article Title Examples
  • Nope
  • "This Is Where I Belong"-Identity, Social Class,
    and the Nostalgic Englishness of Ray Davies and
    the Kinks
  • Yep
  • "This Is Where I Belong Identity, Social Class,
    and the Nostalgic Englishness of Ray Davies and
    the Kinks.

30
Title of Resource (underlined)
  • Title of
  • Book, Anthology, Encyclopedia
  • Journal
  • Newspaper
  • Website
  • Edition (if needed)
  • Number of volumes (if needed)

31
Title of Resource Examples
  • Nope
  • The Journal of Popular Culture
  • Yep
  • Journal of Popular Culture

32
Publication Information
  • Place of Publication (books)
  • City, sometimes state
  • Major cities dont need state added
  • If adding state, use postal code
  • Publishers name (simply!)

33
Publisher Examples
  • Nope
  • Hello Kitty Publishers, Inc. Santa Rosa.
  • Yep
  • Santa Rosa, CA Hello Kitty.

34
Date of Publication
  • Book
  • Year
  • If many, use most recent
  • Magazine
  • Date day month year
  • Journal
  • Volume.Issue (year)
  • Newspaper
  • Include edition
  • Website
  • Last date updated
  • Online source
  • Date accessed

35
Where do you find all that stuff?
36
The books cover?
Nope!
37
Where do you find this stuff?
  • Book title page
  • Author
  • Publisher
  • Place of publication
  • Title page verso (back of title page)
  • Date of publication

38
The title page!
Title of the book
Subtitle of the book
Authors of the book
Publisher of the book
Place of publication
39
The verso (back of the title page)
Date of publication
CIP data, ignore!
40
For Periodicals
Publication Information
Title
Authors
41
For Online Periodicals
Publication Information
Authors
Title
42
Works Cited Format Notes
  • Alphabetize by first item
  • Usually Authors last name
  • Double space
  • Hanging Indent
  • Indent 5 spaces after first line
  • Can be set on in Word

43
Works Cited Format Notes
  • Item not available? Leave blank
  • Sentence punctuation
  • Period after each section!
  • Dates day month, year
  • Remove hyperlinks! (See example)

44
When you understand the pattern
  • Its not such a mystery!

45
The pattern
  • Author
  • Title
  • Publication information

46
Basic Book Citation Model (see Reader)
  • Authors name (Last name, First name). Article
    Title (if needed). Book Title. Ed. Editors
    name (first name first, if needed). Place of
    publication Publisher, Date. first-last (page
    numbers, if needed).

47
Reference Resource Model (See Reader)
  • Author (last name first). Article Title.
    Encyclopedia or Resource Title, Ed. First name,
    last name if needed. Place of publication
    Publisher, date. First-last (page numbers not
    needed if alphabetical).

48
In-class Exercise
49
Crazy Mixed-Up Citations
  • Groups of 3-4
  • Use mixed-up examples
  • Create well-ordered citations
  • Present to class!

50
Example
  • Mixed-Up
  • 1991
  • Cynthia Heimel
  • Grove Press
  • New York
  • If You Cant Live Without Me, Why Arent You Dead
    Yet?
  • Correct
  • Heimel, Cynthia. If You Cant Live Without Me,
    Why Arent You Dead Yet? New York Grove, 1991.

51
Group 1 Presentation Book
  • Are We Having Fun Yet?
  • Dutton
  • New York
  • Bill Griffith
  • 1985
  • Griffith, Bill.
  • Are We Having Fun Yet?
  • New York
  • Dutton,
  • 1985

52
Group 2 Website
  • November 2, 2006
  • Hello Kitty Central
  • Sanrio, Inc.
  • Hello Kitty Central.
  • 2 Nov. 2006
  • Sanrio, Inc.
  • 31 Jan. 2007
  • .

53
Group 3 Magazine Article
  • Mama Mia Please Get This Song Out of My Head
  • James Kellaris
  • Psychology Today
  • December 12, 2003
  • Pages 18-22
  • Kellaris, James
  • Mama Mia Please Get This Song Out of My Head.
  • Psychology Today
  • 12 Dec. 2003
  • 18-23.

54
Group 4 Journal Article
  • WHEN DOES HUMOR ENHANCE OR INHIBIT AD RESPONSES?
  • James Kellaris
  • Thomas Cline
  • Moses Altsheck
  • Journal of Advertising Research
  • Fall 2003.Vol.32, Iss. 3  pg. 31, 15 pgs

55
Group 5 Encyclopedia Article
  • Alfred Hitchcock.
  • ed. Leslie Halliwell.
  • Encyclopaedia of Film
  • London
  • Oxford University Press,
  • 2003.
  • Encyclopaedia of Film
  • Oxford University Press
  • 2003
  • Alfred Hitchcock
  • Leslie Halliwell (editor)
  • London

56
Evaluating Sources
57
Why bother?
  • Knowledgeable perspective
  • Discern between reliable questionable
    information
  • Hone in on useful information
  • Internet environment

58
Evaluating Sources the Basics
  • Lets recap
  • Primary or secondary resource?
  • Popular or scholarly? (new!)
  • Objective or Subjective?

59
Primary
  • Or Secondary?

60
Primary Sources Review
  • First-hand accounts or direct sources
  • the horses mouth
  • Lecture notes note!

61
Pack on My Back
  • Example of a Primary Source

62
  • I jumped out of bed and pulled on my pants.
    Everybody in the house was trying to save as much
    as possible.
  • I tied my clothes in a sheet. With my clothes
    under my arm and my pack on my back, I left the
    house with the rest of the family. Everybody was
    running north. People were carrying all kinds of
    crazy things. A woman was carrying a pot of soup,
    which was spilling all over her dress.

63
Citing Electronic Primary Sources
  • Citation example in Reader
  • How to Cite Electronic Primary Sources from the
    Library of Congress
  • http//memory.loc.gov/learn/start/cite/index.html
  • Use the general MLA format for non-electronic
    sources
  • http//www.santarosa.edu/library/guides/mla.pdf

64
Secondary sources Review
  • Interpretations or reviews of research
  • Represents majority of sources

65
Example of a Secondary Source History of the
Great Chicago Fire
  • Upward of 500 families were fleeing from the
    seeming wrath to come. The streets were almost
    impassable

66
Example of a Secondary Source History of the
Great Chicago Fire
  • Then the fire reached over the street, and while
    that terrible southwestern wind howled onward
    Then it got into the lumber yards and into the
    railroad shops, and the round houses were soon
    wrapped ill its dead embrace.
  • Citation examples in class Reader

67
Popular
  • Or Scholarly?

68
Popular Sources
  • Intended for general audiences, not experts

69
Scholarly Resources
  • Audience with background in the field
  • In-depth treatment of specific aspect of topic

70
Popular vs. Scholarly
  • Colino, Stacey. Six Surprising Reasons You're
    Not Losing Weight.  Redbook Jan 2005 44-46
  • Abstract Colino explores six reasons of weight
    gain despite best efforts to lose it. Among
    others, researchers from Deakin University in
    Australia found that people who watched between
    one and two-and-a-half hours of TV per day were
    93 percent more likely to be overweight than
    those who watched less than an hour per day.
  • Dunstan, D., Salmon, J., Owen, N.,  Armstrong,
    T.  et al. Physical Activity and Television
    Viewing in Relation to Risk of Undiagnosed
    Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Adults.  Diabetes
    Care.  27.11  (2004) 2603-10
  • Abstract Dunstan et. all seek to assess the
    associations of physical activity time and
    television time with risk of "undiagnosed"
    abnormal glucose metabolism in Australian adults.
    Their findings suggest a protective effect of
    physical activity and a deleterious effect of
    television time on the risk of abnormal glucose
    metabolism in adults. Population strategies to
    reduce risk of abnormal glucose metabolism should
    focus on reducing sedentary behaviors and
    increasing physical activity.

71
Scholarly sources
  • appropriate for college papers!

72
Objective
  • Or Subjective?

73
Objective Information Review
  • Factual, undistorted by emotion or personal bias

74
Subjective Information Review
  • Conclusions based on personal opinions, background

75
Evaluating Sources
  • The Next Level

76
Criteria for Evaluating All Sources START (The
Fab Five)
  • Scope/Coverage
  • Treatment/Reliability
  • Authority
  • Relevancy
  • Timeliness/Currency

77
Strategies for Evaluating Scope/Coverage
  • Whats it all about whats covered?
  • Table of contents
  • Index
  • Intended audience?
  • Broad overview of topic or specific subtopic?
  • Graphics, tables, statistical information?
  • Chapters (books), sections (articles), pages
    (website)

78
Scope/Coverage Example
  • Whitby Museum James Cook Web Site
  • Excellent site for Cooks early days
  • Coverage does not include his famous voyages

79
Strategies for Evaluating Treatment/Reliability
  • A toughie!
  • Sources cited?
  • Complete bibliography?
  • Statistics, references cited?
  • Information valid and well-researched or
    questionable, unsupported by evidence?

80
(No Transcript)
81
An Expert?
  • Demand more from your sources!
  • Another example, from the same questionable
    source

82
(No Transcript)
83
Expert identified!
  • Brisbane College of Zoological Studies
  • Dr.George McDevlin
  • Unfortunately, neither one seems to exist

84
Evaluating Authority
  • Authors background
  • Expert in his/her field?
  • Specific credentials, degrees in the subject?
  • Training, education, experience in field?
  • Other works by author in field?
  • Publisher a known publishing house, university
    press, professional organization?

85
Strategies for Evaluating Authority
  • Where to find information about an author
  • Periodicals
  • At end or beginning of article text
  • Contributors page
  • Click on authors name in online database
  • Books
  • Book jacket, introduction or notes
  • Check online databases
  • Online search
  • Website
  • About Us information
  • Check linking pages Alexa

86
Evaluating Authority
  • Example, for a source about Seasonal Affective
    Disorder
  • Joe Schmo has a PhD. in Environmental Psychology
    from Really Big University. His research in the
    area of S.A.D. began in 1982. His published
    works include the books Rain, Rain Go Away and
    Stormy Weather. He is currently an instructor at
    Small But Prestigious University and provides
    commentary on the Weather Channel.

87
Authority Example
  • FactCheck.org - Annenberg Political Fact Check
  • Unusually detailed About Us section
  • Includes information about site, funding, staff

88
Strategies for Evaluating Relevancy
  • Answers your questions?
  • Fills your information need?
  • Right kind of source for project?
  • Parameters of your project
  • If not, pick another source

89
Strategies for Evaluating Timeliness/Currency
  • Age of information?
  • Up-to-date for topic?
  • New discoveries, or related events taken place?
  • Does it matter?
  • Topic changing quickly or fairly stable,
    requiring more background information?
  • Science, health, politics vs. humanities

90
Timeliness/Currency Example
  • http//www.bartleby.com/107/pages/page1292.html

Interesting source, but not appropriate for
current information!
91
In-Class Worksheet
  • Evaluating an Information Source

92
Evaluation Exercise
  • Groups of 3-4 Include your names!
  • Review source, complete worksheet

93
Homework for Next Week
  • Evaluating Sources

94
Evaluating Sources
  • Establishing Points of View

95
Points of View
  • Very difficult to eliminate from human
    communication

96
Points of View
  • Examples
  • Bias
  • Spin

97
Intent of Source
  • Commercial?
  • Persuasion?

Doesnt necessarily mean information is faulty
Not quid pro quo
Rather, a factor or indicator
98
Bias From Both Sides
  • Information source
  • Authors opinion or point of view that may
    influence the presentation or content of
    information source
  • easier to spot when you disagree!
  • Reader/Viewer/Listener
  • Preference or inclination inhibiting impartial
    judgment
  • Partiality preventing objective consideration of
    issue

99
Spin
  • From pbs.org
  • The particular interpretation or emphasis
    applied to information to enhance the public
    image of, or to minimize political damage to, a
    politician.
  • Applies to organizations, groups
  • Generally used to sway public opinion
  • Uses selective evidence/facts to support

100
How to Evaluate Information Validity
  • For fun and profit

101
Evaluating for Information Validity
  • Facts check multiple sources
  • Data check source, methodology
  • Research results
  • Read methodology carefully
  • Examine data
  • Graphics
  • Photographs?
  • Tables, charts, etc.

102
Check the Research
  • From Gender and the Internet by Hiroshi Ono and
    Madeline Zavodny
  •  Social Science Quarterly, March 2003.

103
Check the Research
  • Objective This article examines whether there
    are differences in men's and women's use of the
    Internet and whether any such gender gaps have
    changed in recent years.
  • Methods We use data from several surveys during
    the period 1997-2001 to show trends in Internet
    usage

104
What would you check next?
105
Check the Research
  • We use several data sets from different points
    in time during 1997-2001.
  • Multiple data sets give a more complete picture
    of Internet usage patterns each survey asks
    slightly different questions about Internet
    activities.
  • Identifies surveys

106
Check the Research, cont.
  • Results Women were significantly less likely
    than men to use the Internet at all in the
    mid-1990s, but this gender gap in being online
    disappeared by 2000. However, once online, women
    remain less frequent and less intense users of
    the Internet.
  • Concepts unclear? Check definition and
    measurement method

107
Though it takes timethis kind of detective work
  • provides details for your annotations

108
Annotations
  • They Make Life Worth Living

109
General Guidelines for Annotations
  • In your Reader and online
  • http//online.santarosa.edu/homepage/jfilkins/anno
    tations.html

110
What is an Annotated Bibliography?
  • List of citations to books, articles and
    documents (e.g. sources)
  • Followed by brief (200-250 words) descriptive and
    evaluative paragraph the annotation
  • Informs reader of the relevance, accuracy, and
    quality of sources cited

111
Annotations vs. Abstracts
  • Abstracts
  • Purely descriptive summaries often found at the
    beginning of scholarly journal articles or in
    periodical indexes
  • Annotations
  • Descriptive and critical
  • Expose the author's point of view, authority
  • Evaluate reliability, timeliness of information
  • Relevance to your research

112
Before Writing Your Annotation
  • Locate books, periodicals, documents
  • Sources should support all aspects of your topic
  • Examine and review, choose works that provide a
    variety of perspectives on your topic

113
Before Writing Your Annotation
  • Books
  • Not necessary to read in entirety
  • Read or use scanning technique
  • Periodical and Internet sources
  • Must be read completely
  • No newspaper articles or book reviews
  • Cite each book, article or document using MLA
    style

114
Now youre ready to write your
  • annotation!

115
Writing Annotations
  • A ten step program

116
Annotation Workshop
  • Dont write a review!
  • Using separate piece of paper, write down 5
    criteria
  • Scope/Coverage
  • Treatment/Reliability
  • Authority
  • Relevancy
  • Timeliness/Currency

117
Annotation Workshop No Reviews!
  • Leave space below each of the criteria
  • As you read source, jot down impressions under
    each heading
  • Do more research if necessary (especially
    regarding authority)
  • Read source again, develop your ideas

118
Annotation Workshop No Reviews!
  • Start writing your annotation
  • Make each criteria is covered completely
  • Proofread for errors
  • Double check citation format
  • Check the final project format for spacing,
    indents, etc.

119
Homework for Next Week
  • Library tour
  • Thesis Statement/ Research Question Worksheet
  • Evaluating Information Sources sheet
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