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Welcome DPS Creative Arts Teachers

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Title: Welcome DPS Creative Arts Teachers


1
Welcome DPS Creative Arts Teachers
  • Please sign in
  • Enjoy a snack, courtesy of the
  • DPS Art Department
  • Take a Gallery Walk of
  • Process and Tools
  • For todays presentation, creative arts
    refers to teachers of visual, musical, and
    dramatic arts.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
2
Oh, The More We Get Together
  • The more we get together, Together, together,
    The more we get together, The better
    instruction will be. For your kids are my
    kids, And my kids are your kids. The more we get
    together, Quality instruction well see! 
  • tune The More We Get Together

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
3
Philosophy, Pedagogy, and Teaching Strategies
for Teaching the Creative Arts to Young
Children
  • Presenters
  • Celine Richwine-Marquez
  • Lucy Mullen Davis
  • DPS Early Education Specialists

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
4
Why You Are Here
  • Pre-Kindergarten
  • City of Denvers Denver Preschool Program (DPP)
  • Early Reading First
  • Head Start
  • 20072008
  • 33 full-day sessions 177 half-day sessions
  • 20082009
  • 129 full-day sessions 89 half-day sessions

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
5
  • Kindergarten
  • Mill Levy
  • State Funding added June 2008
  • Tuition-Based
  • 20072008
  • 180 full-day kindergartens 77 half-day sessions
  • 20082009
  • 229 full-day kindergartens 25 half-day sessions

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
6
HOWEVER, the children NEED YOU!
Developed by the Early Ed. Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
7
  • An arts education is essential to academic
    achievement... In a global economy, graduates
    with skills in imagination, creativity, and
    innovation will be heavily sought after by
    employers.
  • page 1, The Arts, Creative Learning Student
    Achievement, 2008 Study of ARTS Education in
    Colorado Public Schools

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
8
Children who have a music program once a week
  • ? Four times more likely to win academic
    award or be named to honor roll
  • ? Three times more likely to win school
    attendance award.
  • ? Eight times more likely to receive community
    service award
  • ? Four times more likely to participate in
    science or mathematics fair
  • Stanford University, 10-year national study,
    based on the records of 30,000 children in 30
    locations from Hawaii to Massachusetts

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
9
  • The relationship between drama and the
    development of literacy skills among young
    children is well documented.
  • Dramatic enactment can make a measurable
    difference in helping students reach important
    curricular goals, such as story understanding,
    reading, comprehension, and topical writing
    skills.

10
Early Childhood and the Creative Arts
 
  • Traditionally an integral part of early
    childhood curriculum

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
11
Creative Arts and Early Education Issues
 
  • Limited to no training
  • Curricular focus 3 Rs
  • Minimal time designated to arts
  • Lack of space and/or materials
  • Noisy (musical instruments) and/or messy (art)

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
12
The children NEED YOU!
Developed by the Early Ed. Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
13
When Working With Younger Children, Dont Sweat
it…
 
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
14
Allow Inner Child to Emerge!
 
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
15
Outcomes
  • Philosophy
  • Developmentally Appropriate Practices
  • Pedagogy
  • Understanding how young children learn
  • Appropriate curriculum for young children
  • Teaching Strategies
  • Environment
  • Rituals and Routines
  • Process vs. Product

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
16
HOUSEKEEPING
 
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
17
Parking Lot
  • of Burning Questions
  • District
  • School
  • Art Department
  • Early Education

18
Management
 
  • Table representation music, theater, and visual
    art
  • Numbered heads 14

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
19
Job Assignment
 
  • Number 1 Materials Manager
  • Procure and distribute enough materials for
    your table, return extra materials to their
    original location, ensure the group cleans up
    after itself, and properly puts away all
    materials at the end of todays session.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
20
Job Assignment
  • Number 2 Participation Pal
  • Ensure all participants at the table have an
    opportunity to express their ideas and
    participate in activities, monitor the group to
    assure it stays on task and permits only off-task
    activity if majority rules You have exclusive
    use of the Bird Walker.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
21
Job Assignment
  • Number 3 Scribe
  • Record responses when requested.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
22
Job Assignment
  • Number 4 Reporter
  • Presents groups responses and ideas to the
    whole group or other small groups upon request.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
23
First Assignment
  • Materials Managers
  • Go to materials table.
  • Pick up one Ziploc bag.
  • And one plastic box.
  • Bring them to the table.
  • Open the bag. Hand out job table tents.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
24
In My Own Time, In My Own Way by Sharon
MacDonald
  • Why cant I lose my tooth?
  • I've had it much too long.
  • Why cant I learn to skip?
  • My legs are nice and strong.
  • Why cant I write my name?
  • Each letter I can say.
  • Why cant I make a dinosaur?
  • From my fat ball of clay?

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
25
Why cant I hop on one foot? Shoes must be the
key. Why cant I draw a picture that is the
face of me? Why cant I grow up fast? I'm
learning day by day. My Mama says it all will
happen. In my own time. In my own way.
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
26
Philosophy How Young Children Grow and Develop
  • Two Pervasive Theories
  • Government time
  • Scientifically based child growth and
    development

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
27
Governments View of Child Development
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
28
Child Development 101 Readers Digest Condensed
  • Children come to us with own strengths and
    unique perceptions based on their experiences
    with the world.
  • They march to the beat of their own drum and
    respond to the ticking of their own clock.
  • They grow and develop and change in many ways,
    according to their own blueprint...

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
29
Children in the Same Classroom
  • Cole (1 hour old)
  • Born October 1, 2004
  • Kassidy (11 months, 29 days old)
  • Born September 30, 2003

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
30
In my own time...In my own way
  • Imagine each child has those words emblazoned
    across his/her forehead…
  • Then educators would be better prepared to meet
    each childs needs and help them develop the
    potential for creative expression.
  • Not to mention traditional academic pursuits
  • Korynne, 5 years old
  • MY time
  • MY way

MY time MY way

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
31
Child Development
  • Four major growth and development areas
  • Physical
  • Mental
  • Emotional
  • Social

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
32
Physical Development
  • Large muscles develop first.
  • Development progresses from the head down as the
    child matures.
  • Body movements develop from the shoulders out.
  • Development then moves toward control of the fine
    muscles in hands and fingers.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
33
4 Year Old
  • Can clumsily write, draw, make things, play
    musical instruments but usually at a low skill
    level.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
34
5 Year Old
  • Fine motor skills become more developed can
    fasten buttons faster cut, paste, draw, and
    write with more control
  • Musical fingering ability opens up about age 5.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
35
6 Year Old
  • Use of fingers and eye-hand coordination
    continues to develop

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
36
Vision and Hearing Development
  • Binocular vision develops between ages 1 and 3.
  • Between 4 and 5 years old is prime time" for
    visual and auditory development.
  • Visual acuity develops from birth to about age 6
    or 7.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
37
Share Round Robin
  • 1) Starting with Head 1 and going to his/her
    right
  • Each person shares an answer to this question
  • What are the instructional implications in art,
    music, and drama in regard to considering young
    childrens physical development?
  • 2) Continue to circle the table until time is
    called.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
38
Mental Development
  • Attention Span
  • A general rule of thumb is a normal attention
    span is 2 to 5 minutes per year of a childs
    age.
  • Two-year-olds should be able to concentrate on a
    particular task for an average of 46 minutes.
  • A child in ECE should be able to concentrate for
    815 minutes.
  • A kindergartener should be able to concentrate
    for at least 15 minutes.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
39
Share Round Robin
  • 1) Starting with Head 1 and going to his/her left
  • Each person shares an answer to this question
  • What are the instructional implications in art,
    music, and drama in regard to considering young
    childrens attention span?
  • 2) Continue to circle the table until time is
    called.

40
Three-Dimensional Links of Developmentally
Appropriate Practice (DAP)
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
41
Key Components of a Developmentally Appropriate
Practice Curriculum
  • Learning is an interactive process.
  • Teacher provides stimulating environment and
    interesting materials to encourage exploration.
  • Activities and experiences are concrete, real,
    and relevant to childrens lives.
  • Activities are planned for a wide developmental
    range. (NAEYC recommends 2-year age span)

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
42
  • Art, music, and drama are part of daily
    activities.
  • They are necessary components of a young childs
    day and should not occur only when time permits.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
43
  • Every childs background and culture should be
    valued and acknowledged.
  • Activities and lessons should meet every childs
    developmental needs.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
44
Ways Children Learn The Whole Child Philosophy
  • ASCD proposes a broader definition of achievement
    and accountability that promotes the development
    of children who are healthy, safe, engaged,
    supported, and challenged.
  • Emotional, Mental/Intellectual, Physical, and
    Social Development

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
45
Optimal Ways Children Learn
  • Active learning or engagement
  • Exploration
  • Sensory learning tactile, visual, oral,
    auditory, olfaction
  • Inquiry


Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
46
Pedagogy What Young Children Are Expected To
Learn
  • CDE Music Standards K4
  • STANDARD 1 Students sing or play on instruments
    a varied repertoire of music, alone or with
    others.
  • STANDARD 2 Students will read and notate music.
  • STANDARD 3 Students will create music.
  • STANDARD 4 Students will listen to, analyze,
    evaluate, and describe music.
  • STANDARD 5 Students will relate music to various
    historical and cultural traditions.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
47
CDE Visual Arts Standards K4
  • STANDARD 1 Students recognize and use visual
    arts as a form of communication.
  • STANDARD 2 Students know and apply elements of
    art, principles of design, and sensory and
    expressive features of visual arts.
  • STANDARD 3 Students know and apply visual arts
    materials, tools, techniques, and processes.
  • identify and describe different materials,
    tools, techniques, and processes
  • use materials, tools, techniques, and
    processes to make works of art.
  • STANDARD 4 Students relate the visual arts to
    various historical and cultural traditions.
  • STANDARD 5 Students analyze and evaluate
    characteristics, merits, and meanings of works of
    art.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
48
CDE Theater Standards K4
  • STANDARD 1 Students develop interpersonal skills
    and problem-solving capabilities through group
    interaction and artistic collaboration.
  • STANDARD 2 Students understand and apply the
    creative process to skills of story telling,
    playwriting, acting, and directing.
  • STANDARD 3 Students understand and apply the
    creative process to skills of design and
    technical production.
  • STANDARD 4 Students understand and relate the
    role of theater arts to culture and history.
  • STANDARD 5 Students analyze and assess
    characteristics, merits, and meanings of
    traditional and modern forms of dramatic
    expression.
  • STANDARD 6 Students know and apply connections
    between theater and other disciplines.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
49
ECE Work Sampling Assessment System
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
50
Activity Skim and Scan
  • Materials Manager
  • Go to materials table.
  • Pick up one packet of stapled papers under the
    picture.?
  • Bring them to your table and separate pages.
  • If you need them, get more highlighters from
    materials table.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
51
Activity Skim and Scan
  • Partners
  • Heads 1 and 2
  • Heads 3 and 4
  • Each partnership takes two pages from the Omnibus
    Guidelines packet.
  • Skim and scan the Preschool column on each page
    and highlight blinking words from you and your
    partners content area.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
52
ECE Work Sampling Assessment System
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
53
Information Exchange
  • Each person takes one document page to share
    their ideas or observations from their page with
    a new partner
  • 2. For 3 minutes Heads 1 and 3 share. Heads 2
    and 4 share.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
54
Teaching Strategies
  • Routines and Rituals
  • Predictable structures that allow students to be
    responsible for knowing what to do and how to do
    it
  • Allow teacher to use precious instructional time
    for teaching vs. managing

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
55
Routines and Rituals
  • Short discussions on expected
  • behaviors followed by
  • Teacher model
  • Children model and practice
  • Start small
  • Build gradually

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
56
  • Management Technique 1
  • Post procedures in classroom with simple words
    or phases, and
  • Add rebus or icon.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
57
Organized Classroom
  • Label items with words and pictures
  • Label where materials are stored

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
58
Management Technique 2
  • Getting Their Attention
  • Use method that fits your style
  • Should be audible or easily visible
  • Key to the success of this tool is
  • explicitly teaching and practicing its use
  • consistently using it
  • Samples magic wand, maracas, xylophone, timer
    bell, song with response, nursery rhyme with
    response, rhythm clapping

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
59
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
60
Cooperative Learning Techniques
  • One goal is to streamline classroom management to
    promote optimum learning.
  • more time-on-task
  • teach students self-help skills
  • promote active participation
  • makes teachers life easier

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
61
  • Large group activities should be short and allow
    participation from each child.

Small group activities are more effective for
direct instruction.
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
62
Learning Stations
  • Visual Art
  • Group 1 Creation Station
  • Materials containers of found objects, glue,
    variety of paper
  • Objective children can explore texture, color,
    design
  • Group 2 Painting
  • Materials smocks, paint, paper, easels or table
  • Objective children paint using their fine motor
    skills
  • Group 3 Listening Station
  • Materials headphones, tape/CD player, paper,
    markers
  • Objective children listen to instrumental music
    and doodle or draw what they feel using the
    music for inspiration OR have a book with an art
    theme
  • Group 4 Art Teacher Table
  • Direct instruction based upon texts being given
    tomorrow or…

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
63
Activity Station
Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
64
Activity Round Table
  • Materials Managers
  • At the signal, go get three pieces of paper.
  • Bring them to your table.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
65
Activity Round Table
  • Scribe
  • Get three pencils or pens from the plastic box.
  • When the paper arrives, title
  • 1 piece Art Station,
  • 1 piece Music Station, and
  • 1 piece Drama Station.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
66
Activity Round Table
  • Head 4 start with Art Station paper.
  • Head 3 start with Music Station paper.
  • Head 2 start with Drama Station paper.
  • Head 1 sits quietly, THINKING.

Developed by the Early Education Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
67
Activity Round Table
  • At the signal, write on your designated paper an
    idea for a station that matches the art form
    labeled at the top page.
  • Another signal will indicate to pass the paper to
    the person on your right, who will then continue
    to add a station corresponding to the art form
    labeled at the top of the page.
  • There will be four rotations One person will
    have time to think each round.

68
Activity Round Table
  • Scribes will now collect all three sheets of
    paper and give them to Lucy.
  • These sheets will be typed and emailed.
  • Hopefully, you will receive some good ideas!

69
Product vs. Process
  • For young children, the finished product is
    relatively unimportant, which is contrary to
    adults view.
  • A child usually puts thoughts and experimentation
    into what he/she paints, which is not evident in
    the finished product nor can they articulate what
    they were really thinking.
  • Provide rich and interesting materials

70
  • They are not aware the music they are making does
    not have good pitch or tune or should be viewed
    as enjoyable by others.
  • They just like experimenting and making
    different noises with a variety of instruments.

71
  • Creative artsmusic, drama, and visual develop
    through doing, again and again, with many
    opportunities to explore and experiment with a
    wide variety of media and/or materials.
  • Creative abilities develop as the rest of the
    child developsphysically, cognitively, socially,
    and emotionally.

72
  • Creative arts help children become divergent
    thinkersto see more than one way to do
    something, more than one way to solve a problem.
  • Creative arts are a marvelous way for children to
    express how they feel in constructive ways.

73
  • Creative arts are processes that are… sometimes
    slow in manifesting themselves in little ones
    and frequently messy and loud.
  • Get messy!

Get loud!
74
  • The potential for artistic self-expression is
    fragile and must be handled with care.
  • Its dependent on self-confidence, a positive
    self-image, and a sense of independence within
    an accepting environment.

75
The children NEED YOU!
Developed by the Early Ed. Instructional
Specialist Team 10-20-08
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