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Severe Weather Preparedness 20062007

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Title: Severe Weather Preparedness 20062007


1
Severe Weather Preparedness 2006-2007
Jim Uhlir Steve Mammino UCF Environmental Healt
h Safety
2
The UCF Emergency Plan on Hurricanes
www.ehs.ucf.edu
  • Only the UCF President or the Governor can close
    the university.
  • UCF strives to keep our closing decisions in sync
    with area schools and community colleges.
  • When emergency conditions arise, Bill Merck, VP
    for Administration Finance, is the coordinating
    official for the UCF response.
  • UCF EHS sends out weather information and
    preparedness advisories once a day if a tropical
    storm has the potential to threaten Central
    Florida.

3
The UCF Emergency Plan on Hurricanes
www.ehs.ucf.edu
  • Essential Departments (Environmental Health
    Safety, Police, Physical Plant, Housing, Computer
    Telecomm Services, Business Services, Health
    Services, and UCF News) prepare for storm duty.
  • If shelters are needed, EHS coordinates their
    opening with Housing and Police. Other essential
    departments support this effort. RAs staff the
    shelters.
  • UCF News will report on the situation via
    www.ucf.edu and local media.

4
UCF Also Has a COOP (Continuity of Operations)
Plan and Team
  • Members
  • All of the Emergency Team (essential departments)
    mentioned previously, PLUS
  • Academic Affairs, Information Technologies
  • Admissions, Registrar, Financial Aid
  • Finance Accounting, Purchasing, Human
    Resources
  • Office of Research
  • And more!

5
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
6
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
The Storm is Tracked
7
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
Administrators Meet with the Emergency Team to
Decide on Classes, Shelters, and Special Events
8
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
Operations Centers are Staffed to Keep Vital
Infrastructure Up and Running
9
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
EOC Is Used to Coordinate the Operation Centers,
Shelters and Official Communications
10
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
Shelter Staff Performs Check-Ins
11
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
During the Hurricane Ride Out Period Everyone
Is Safe, but Stress Continues to Build
12
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
The Post-Storm Damage Assessment Often Brings
Relief Sometimes Not
13
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
Clean-Up Begins
14
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
Emergency Team Briefs Administration on
Re-Opening Possibilities
15
How the Emergency Management System Works for
Hurricanes
Classes Open / Reopen
16
What Do Hurricanes Look Like?
17
Saffir Simpson Hurricane Scale
What Do Hurricanes Look Like?
  • CAT 1  74-95 mph (Irene 1999)
  • CAT 2  96-110 mph (Frances 2004)
  • CAT 3  111-130 mph (Jeanne 2004)
  • CAT 4  131-155 mph (Charley 2004)
  • CAT 5  155 mph (Andrew 1992, Katrina 2005)
  • Maximum Sustained Winds
  • Sustained winds are defined as a 1-minute average
    wind measured at about 33 ft (10 meters) above
    the surface. Maximum means they occur SOMEWHERE
    (not EVERYWHERE) within the storm.

18
What Do Hurricanes Look Like?
Storm Surge Downtown Miami, 1926
NOAA photo
19
What Do Hurricanes Look Like?
Hurricane Katrina Approaching the Louisiana
Coastline
August 29, 2005
NASA photo
20
What Do Hurricanes Look Like?
NOAA Hurricane Mitch Forecast
21
What Do Hurricanes Look Like?
Rain Bands
Water Spouts Taken at Okeechobee (Near Lake Shore
Curve at Conner House) During Eye Lull in a 1928
Hurricane
Thomas Markham Collection
22
What Do Hurricanes Look Like?
Rain Bands
Charleys First Bands Orlando, Florida
August 13, 2004
Orlando Sentinel photos
23
What Do Hurricanes Look Like?
Storm Surge
Miami Area, 1945
NOAA photo
24
Where Orlandos Hurricanes Come From
25
Where Orlandos Hurricanes Come From
  • Brevard to Orlando Hurricanes our worst case
    scenario
  • Erin Aug., 1995- Cat. 1
  • August, 1928- Cat. 2
  • July, 1926- Cat. 2
  • August, 1880- Cat. 2
  • August, 1871- Cat.1 or 2

26
Where Orlandos Hurricanes Come From
  • Treasure Coast to Orlando Hurricanes
  • Jeanne September 2004- Cat. 3
  • Frances September 2004- Cat. 2
  • David September 1979- Cat. 2
  • Cleo August 1964- Cat. 2
  • August 1949- Cat. 4
  • August 1939- Cat. 1
  • September 1933- Cat. 4
  • September 1928- Cat. 4

27
Where Orlandos Hurricanes Come From
  • Southwest FL to Orlando Hurricanes
  • Charley, August 2004- Cat. 4
  • Abby, June, 1968- Cat. 1
  • Donna, September 1960- Cat. 4
  • October 1944- Cat. 3
  • September 1894- Cat. 3
  • October 1873- Cat. 3

28
Where Orlandos Hurricanes Come From
  • Tampa Bay to Orlando Hurricanes
  • Easy September 1950- Cat. 3
  • June, 1945- Cat. 1
  • December 1925- Cat. 1
  • October 1921- Cat. 2
  • October 1880- Cat. 1

29
Where Orlandos Hurricanes Come From
  • The East Coast Brush
  • Floyd September 1999- Cat. 4
  • Dennis August 1999- Cat. 2
  • Fran September 1996- Cat. 3
  • Bertha July, 1996- Cat. 2
  • David September 1979- Cat. 2
  • Cleo August 1964- Cat. 1
  • August 1899- Cat. 3
  • October, 1893- Cat. 3
  • August 1893- Cat. 3
  • August 1887- Cat. 3

30
Where Orlandos Hurricanes Come From
UCF Main Campuss worst case scenario Category
5 East Coast direct hit with a leading edge band
perpendicular to and in the middle of Canaveral
National Seashore 135 -155 mph from the East
/ Northeast
31
How Bad Could It Get Here?
32
How Bad Could It Get Here?
In 1992, if Hurricane Andrew had hit Cocoa
Beach, much of Orlando would have experienced 135
mph sustained winds.
Max Mayfield photo
NOAA photo
33
How to Read NHC Forecasts
34
How to Read NHC Forecasts
  • Check the daily tropical weather outlook.
  • Storm advisories are issued at 5 AM, 11 AM, 5 PM
    and 11 PM EDT daily for named storms.
  • Z time is like military time and is four hours
    ahead of Eastern Daylight Time.
  • 2100 Z 1700 5 PM EDT.

35
How to Read NHC Forecasts
  • Multiply nautical miles (NM) by 1.15 to get
    distances in miles.
  • Multiply knots (KTS) by 1.15 to get wind speed
    in miles per hour.
  • Degrees
  • 0 North
  • 45 NE
  • 90 East
  • 135 SE
  • 180 South
  • 225 SW
  • 270 West
  • 315 NW

36
How to Read NHC Forecasts
Locations Which May Be Mentioned in Hurricane
Warnings
37
How to Read NHC Forecasts
Hurricane Rainfall Flooding
To estimate the total rainfall in inches from a
hurricane, divide 100 by the forward speed of the
storm in miles per hour (100 / forward speed
estimated inches of rain). 30 mph
approx. 3.3 inches rain 20 mph
approx. 5 inches rain 10 mph appr
ox. 10 inches rain 5 mph approx
. 20 inches rain
38
How to Read NHC Forecasts
Max Mayfield, Director, National Hurricane
Center
Dont focus on the skinny black line.
39
How to Read NHC Forecasts
Focus on the Ice Cream Cone of Probability, Not
on the Skinny Black Line of Plotted Points
40
The Impact Storms Can Have on Campus
41
The Impact Storms Can Have on Campus
Charleys Wind Tunnels Through the Main Campus
42
The Impact Storms Can Have on Campus
43
The Impact Storms Can Have on Campus
44
The Impact Storms Can Have on Campus
45
The Impact Storms Can Have on Campus
46
How to Protect Your Home
47
How to Protect Your Home
Windows and Doors
  • Impact-resistant glass
  • Impact-resistant windscreens
  • Shutters (roll-down or accordion)
  • Shutters (storm panels)
  • Plywood
  • Window Film

48
How to Protect Your Home
Impact-Resistant Hurricane Screens
Good for patios, screen rooms and garage doors
Armorscreen.com
49
How to Protect Your Home
Roll-Down Shutters
50
How to Protect Your Home
Plywood Information Photos from NOAA HRD)
  • Use 1/2 inch or thicker
  • Pre-cut boards in order to test-fit them
  • Inset method (shown) with barrel bolts is best.
    Next best is masonry screws w/ anchors and 3
    inches overlap

51
How to Protect Your Home
Plywood (Continued)
  • Store panels in cool, dry place
  • Stack them so as to prevent warping

52
How to Protect Your Home
Plywood (Continued)
  • Plylox clips are good for ½ inch CDX plywood
    when used in the recessed windows of masonry walls

Plylox, Inc. photo
53
How to Protect Your Home
Plywood (Continued)
  • Toothed edge of clip holds plywood tight in the
    opening.

Plylox, Inc. photo
54
How to Protect Your Home
Tape Is a Waste of Time (and Tape)
Jacque Brund photo - 1999
55
How to Protect Your Home
Window Film Information Photos from NOAA HRD)
  • A remarkable product that is being improved
    every year…
  • … it is not a substitute for shutters.
  • … but is great for windows that can't be
    shuttered due to access or architecture.
  • Remember that the film only protects the
    glass... the window frame is still under
    pressure and the window can still fail if frames
    are weak.
  • Windows with these treatments will still suffer
    damage from impacting debris.

56
How to Protect Your Home
Dont forget your biggest opening the garage
Storm Smart Building Systems photo
57
Should I Evacuate?
58
Should I Evacuate?
  • If you live in a vulnerable area (coast, flood-
    prone area, mobile / manufactured home)…
  • YES
  • If you were told to evacuate by local
    officials…
  • YES
  • Plan your route, make arrangements for your
    pets, pack your shelter supplies, fill your gas
    tank, withdraw extra cash and notify relatives of
    your plan… then leave early.
  • Go to relatives, hotel, or designated shelter

59
Should I Evacuate?
If you choose to stay...
  • Secure outdoor equipment. Bring in loose
    items.
  • Board or cover windows (if you can).
  • Check your disaster supplies non-perishable
    food, water, diapers, diaper wipes, batteries,
    flashlights, medicines, extra cash, battery
    powered radio.
  • Fill your car with gas.
  • Stay in a safe room (an interior room with no
    windows) when the winds come. Remember the lull
    if the hurricane eye passes over you.
  • Elevate valuable items off the floor and locate
    them in interior rooms without windows, if
    possible.

60
Should I Evacuate?
Bagging Up
  • Heavy plastic bags or sealable tupperware
    tubs/totes can protect computers, electronics,
    pictures and important papers. Get them ready
    now.
  • Remember to back up diskettes and hard drives
    before securing computers for a storm. Keep your
    sealed back-up diskettes in a high dry place.
  • Expect to bag/ board up your property 3 to 4
    times in vain for every one storm that actually
    hits you. This is normal… even with modern storm
    forecasting. Also prepare for a hurricane one
    category stronger than forecast.
  • Allow enough time for both home and workplace
    preparations if you must work the storm.

61
Other Hurricane Tips
62
Other Hurricane Tips
  • Store important papers and special family
    photographs in plastic boxes with seal-top lids.
    Lift them up off the floor, if possible.
  • Make sure your freezer is full of frozen items
    (food and/or water). Make large blocks of ice
    instead of small ones. This will enable it to
    stay
  • cold longer after the power goes
  • out.

Jim Leonard photo
63
Other Hurricane Tips
  • Wash dishes and laundry the day
  • before the storm it may be your
  • last washing of the week.
  • When listening to battery-operated
  • radio or TV, play with the volume
  • low…. higher volume causes
  • batteries to be used up faster.
  • DONT trim your tree branches the day before a
    storm, the debris will likely not be picked up
    and may become airborne missiles. DO trim
    branches now.

Jim Leonard photo Big Pine Key
64
Other Hurricane Tips
Generators
  • Operate generators outdoors only in a
    well-ventilated, dry area, away from air intakes
    to the home, and protected from direct exposure
    to rain
  • Never use a generator indoors or in attached
    garages
  • Plug individual appliances into the generator
    using heavy duty, outdoor rated cords with a wire
    gauge adequate for the appliance load
  • Observe the generator manufacturer's
    instructions for safe operation
  • Do not plug the generator into a wall outlet
  • If connecting the generator into the house
    wiring is necessary, have a qualified electrician
    hook up the standby electrical system

65
Other Hurricane Tips
Portable Generator Sizing
900 Watts 3550 Watts 5500 Watts
500 750 - 1,000 1,000 - 1,200
Lighting Previous Items Previous Items
Radio Fridge Small Stove
TV Window A/C Deep Freeze
More Lights
From BriggsandStratton.com
66
Other Hurricane Tips
Post- Storm How to Patch Roofs
  • To patch, you must have
  • Confidence
  • Knowledge that no power lines
  • or hanging tree branches are
  • in the way or too close
  • A good extension-type ladder (metal or
    fiberglass)
  • Good no skid shoes (fresh tennis shoes or rubber
    soled hiking / work boots)
  • Tarp roofing nails and / or roof patch tar

67
Other Hurricane Tips
Post- Storm How to Patch Roofs
Tarp any areas where you can see holes, bare wood
or exposed tar paper cover the ridge with the
tarp so water doesnt get underneath
Nail the tarp around its edges and cover the
nail heads with a dab of tar roof patch
68
Other Hurricane Tips
Hurricane Anxiety
Give kids small tasks to do so they can feel
somewhat in control.
69
Other Hurricane Tips
Hurricane Anxiety
Establishing routines helps both adults and
children to deal with the stress of the situation
Hurricane Jeanne Staff Shelter
70
Floods
71
Floods
Marietta Ohio, 2005
72
Floods
Do you have flood insurance?
73
Floods
Kissimmee Date Unknown
SFWMD
74
Floods
Flood Safety
  • Eighty percent of flood deaths occur in vehicles,
    and most happen when drivers make a single, fatal
    mistake trying to navigate through flood waters.
  • Just six inches of rapidly moving flood water can
    knock a person down.
  • A mere one foot of water can move a car off the
    road two feet can move a bus.
  • One-third of flooded roads and bridges are so
    damaged by water that any vehicle trying to cross
    stands only a fifty percent chance of making it
    to the other side.

75
Floods
Tropical Storm Jerry, August, 1995
SFWMD
76
Floods
Ohio Floods 2005
77
Floods
Flooded roads often have hidden damage
78
Tornadoes
79
Tornadoes
Oldest known photo of a tornado August 28,
1884, near Howard, South Dakota
NOAA photo
80
Tornadoes
Fujita Tornado Intensity Scale
Category F0 40-72 mph Category F1 73-112 mp
h Category F2 113-157 mph Category F3 15
8-206 mph Category F4 207-260 mph Categor
y F5 261-318 mph
81
Tornadoes
Fujita Tornado Intensity Scale
82
Tornadoes
Downtown Miami - May, 1997
83
Tornadoes
Indy Star
84
Tornadoes
Kissimmee February, 1998
Red Cross photo
85
Tornadoes
New Smyrna Beach, 1997
86
Tornadoes
Am I safe in my vehicle?
So. Maryland Online
87
Tornadoes
No!
Adam Goodman photo
88
Tornadoes
Damage at Embry Riddle Christmas Day Storms 2006
John M. King photos
89
Tornadoes
Damage at Embry Riddle Christmas Day Storms 2006
90
Tornadoes
Tornado Safety
  • Listen to the radio!
  • A tornado watch means conditions are favorable
    for tornadoes to form.
  • A tornado warning means a tornado is in the area
    and has been sighted by people or by radar.
  • In permanent buildings go to an interior room
    on lowest floor.
  • In trailers / modulars go quickly to the
    nearest permanent (brick or block) building until
    warning is canceled. Listen to radio for warning
    cancellation. Plan your route now!

91
Tornadoes
  • KIH63 - Orlando 162.475 Mhz 1000 watts
  • FIPS Codes Orange 012095 Seminole 012117
    Osceola 012097

92
Tornadoes
Sirens for Tornado Alerts
93
Lightning
94
Lightning
Statistics
  • Florida averages about 10 deaths and 50 injuries
    annually due to lightning.
  • Most people survive being struck by lightning,
    but their injuries are often severe. Brain
    injuries are common among lightning survivors.
  • Lightning kills more Floridians than all other
    weather phenomena, including floods, hurricanes,
    and tornadoes.
  • Lightning causes over 1 billion in insured
    property damages per year in the U.S.
  • Nationwide, males have been hit by lightning
    about 5 times as often as females have.

95
Lightning
Places where Floridians are killed by lightning
(in order) 1. on the beach 2. under tree 3.
in boat 4. on roof or construction site 5. o
n tractor, riding mower, cycle or horse 6.
on golf course 7. in the water 8. on the pie
r, dock or bridge 9. in agricultural fields 10.
on football or baseball field
96
Lightning
UCF June , 2004
Jerry Klein photo
97
Lightning
Lightning Safety
  • When thunderstorms threaten, seek shelter in a
    fully enclosed building or car. Avoid water,
    metal objects, and open spaces. Note that golf
    carts, trees, tents and boats are unsafe places!
  • If caught outdoors away from enclosed shelter you
    should avoid contact with other people, remove
    all metal objects from your person, and crouch
    down with feet together and hands on knees.

98
Lightning
Lightning Safety
When indoors during thunderstorms avoid water,
open windows and electrical appliances. This
includes staying off the telephone!
99
Lightning
Lightning Safety Flash to Bang Theory
  • When You See the Flash
  • Start counting or timing
  • When you hear the bang, stop counting
  • Every five seconds one mile away
  • You are generally safe if you count 30 seconds or
    more. This equals six miles.

100
Lightning
Lightning Safety Plans Portable Detection
For outdoor use. Warning Computers, electronics
and motors interfere with signals if located
within 5 to 15 feet.
Strike Alert
101
Lightning
Lightning Safety Plans
LightningStorm.com Provides lightning notific
ation via pager or e mail to subscribers. Uses
the national grid of lightning detectors and is
based on locality information provided by the
subscriber. We recommend this for special events.
Subscription can be for weeks, or months in
duration. EHS recommends lightning safety plan
s for all of UCFs outdoor events in summer and
fall
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